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Karatemom
10-17-2004, 04:15 PM
Maybe the subject of this post should be Not being able to deal with pressure, LOL. By pressure, I mean in a tournament playing for the winner of the winner's bracket, or the match you need to win to get into the dough. I do realize that every match should be played like it is the one and only match you get, but try to go with the flow here.

My game has finally broken out of it's slump, and even I can see major improvements in it. Now I've come across another barrier. At the Midwest Expo/Open, I lost to Bev Ashton fair and square, hill-hill. I got on a ball bad, hit just a touch too soft, and she got out. Okay, I'm in the loser's bracket, damnit, and who do I draw but her sister, Joann. The match against Joann was the match I needed to win to get into the money. My hands got very cold, couldn't make two balls in a row, my heart was beating out of my chest. I figured it was because it was such a big event for me, and Joann was very well known. Oh well, blew it off and didn't think too much about it until yesterday.

Leisure Time had a benefit tournament to raise the reward money for a woman who was murdered over a year ago. There were 8 women in the tournament, none to be taken lightly. TV cameras and everything were there, but they didn't seem to phase me. Until I got to the winner of the winner's bracket match. I had to play a local woman. My game was fine, made a few mistakes, but nothing I couldn't overcome. Except that the whole match, especially the hill-hill game, it started again. Cold hands, heart pounding so hard I thought I was going to faint. I missed the damn 8 ball so bad it was pathetic. Needless to say, I took 3rd, not what I intended.

My problem is, how on earth do I calm myself down during these times? Anyone got any tips I can try. BTW, beer does help a little, but not enough, LOL.

TIA,

Heide

Barbara
10-17-2004, 04:21 PM
Heide,

I would suggest not thinking about the what the outcome of the match means and just concentrate on the shot at hand. You're thinking too much ahead when you have to concentrate on the task at hand.

Baby steps, Girl, baby steps.

Barbara

DennyS
10-17-2004, 06:20 PM
Hi Karatemom, here is a couple things to help.

Stress:
When you are under some undo stress, you have a tendency to tense up during your shot. Your grip and wrist tend to tighten up. The result has a bad effect on your accuracy, power and it will affect your English, topspin or backspin. Try to relax and breathe in from your nose and slowly exhale out through your mouth.

Finishing your Win:
When you reach this point in your match, don't put any additional pressure on yourself by trying to run an impossible layout if a safety is a better option. The key to winning your match is to be patient, remain calm, don't panic, and continue to rely on the skills that have gotten you to this far. Remember what win stands for Whatever Is Necessary!

Leviathan
10-17-2004, 07:12 PM
'Lo, Heide. Hey--you've made great progress!

The big-match nerves are absolutely normal. First a player struggles to develop skills, then she struggles to develop confidence in those skills. I think that's where you are now. Confidence doesn't come painlessly, but it does come more-or-less automatically. When you've played in enough pressure situations they become a little more routine and you won't react to them quite so strongly. When you settle down to the point where you can stick to your pre-shot routine you'll start winning your share of the big matches and your confidence will grow.

I really like what Barbara says about not thinking about what the outcome of the match means. You might try not looking at the draw. It never helps me to know that I've got to win my next match to get into the money.

AS

stickman
10-17-2004, 07:54 PM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote Barbara:</font><hr> Heide,

I would suggest not thinking about the what the outcome of the match means and just concentrate on the shot at hand.

Barbara <hr /></blockquote>

Very sound advice! I would also add that experience in as many pressure situations as possible will help do the trick also. I used to get so nervous that I would become sick and have to quit. I started playing 3 to 4, and sometimes more tournaments a week. Eventually, I became somewhat immune to the tournament nerves. /ccboard/images/graemlins/grin.gif

JimS
10-17-2004, 08:16 PM
Have you talked to Spike about this? He may have some good suggestions for you.

Chris Cass
10-17-2004, 08:36 PM
Are you crazy? Your asking for trouble there bud. OOO are you in for it.

Spike has had the luck of having played with players such as First Jonny Kucharo, Jesse Bowman, Jamie Bowman, Jamie Baraks, Larry Nevel, Charlie Williams, Earl Strickland and Mike Segal. After playing with these guys. Who would sweat anyone else?

I've set Heide in action with Pam Bell for 6 ahead 9 Ball on a 9 ft for 50 bucks. That was out of her element, of the bar table. She went back and forth for quite a longtime. imho She played well. When she got done she was mad at me for making her play for money.

I was only trying to induce pressure. That I thought was a good thing but she wasn't really at a place that I needed to put her in. In actuallity I probably should have atleast let her play on a bar table. Really, I should have and alway put her in action that she has nothing but the winning edge but I'm not about money with her. It's about getting your bones. imho

She's playing good and doesn't appear as nervous as she feels. I'm thinking she's looking way to much into this.

C.C.~~knows better. Spike plays for fun.

Rod
10-17-2004, 08:41 PM
Your doing fine Heide, it's normal to be jittery when you haven't been in that position but a few times. It's called experience and learning your emotions. Learn how it affects your game. Everyone gave you great advice but I'll add a bit to what Denny wrote.

Tension is a killer as mentioned and no doubt it entered your game. You'll never get rid of it completely so you have to work with it. Not only mentally as Barbara mentioned but physically as well.

Playerís tendency under stress is getting to fast; sometimes I think they just want to get the shot over as a relief. It will affect your rhythm/timing especially when you pull the trigger.

In an effort to help prevent this I have three little words.
"Finish Your Backswing". It's important to understand what this really means and how you go about doing such. Another three words, "Start Back Slow". By doing this you give yourself a chance to finish your backswing and start your forward progression. Another Three, "Start Forward Slow".

Although if you start back slow, then finish your back swing the forward motion is less of a problem. It just works that way, your setting yourself up for a good forward stroke.

What I see all to often is a very rushed backswing, you might finish but you may well stop short. In any event the cue is janked forward, is my description. When that happens it's easy to move your body/head then loose focus on the shot. You might not think so because you see what happens but it's just for a tiny fraction of a second.

It happens to the best so your not alone. One area I use it is on the break. When I'm down stroking I use that conscious thought. I just use finish your backswing and it becomes automatic. It helps the effect carry over to my regular game. I have used it on critical shots as well.

You might try that or go back slow, either standing or when your down. It's just a split second thought but it can help a lot especially when itís critical. At the very least you'll have a better understanding of your tendency when you shoot. Hope that helps you.

Rod

Rich R.
10-18-2004, 03:22 AM
Heide, this may be over simplistic, but my advise would be to stop looking at the charts and just play pool. /ccboard/images/graemlins/grin.gif

You may be getting nervous, when you realize that it is an important match. If you don't look at the charts, you don't know when you are playing for the hot seat or some other prime spot.
Just find out what table you are playing on next and go and play. It is also important that you don't pay attention to who you are playing.

In this case, I think "ignorance is bliss". Just play pool and have fun. /ccboard/images/graemlins/grin.gif

Chris Cass
10-18-2004, 04:04 AM
Hi Rod,

That advice is very good. The thing most might not recognize is the muscle end of it. When going into your back swing the muscle tends to lock up if it's drawn back too quickly then when you propell the cue forward the sudden jerk between the two directions will, be hard to control. A slow back swing will let the muscle relax and not tense up therefore you'll be able to deliver a straight follow-through. Good job brother.

Another point you mentioned that was very good was, when in the hill situation and things do get tense. It's often times your mind will want you to get this over with quickly. This can cause problems. The mindset is that you should actually be relieved in knowing you do have the chance to relax and take all the time needed to enjoy the victory. Not end it quickly to get out of the heat. The two are totally different and the first is much better.

Regards,

C.C.

rah
10-18-2004, 08:53 AM
Rod's 'slowing down' advice is good. You may want to try pausing in your backswing. This will definitely slow down your swing and I swear it is like shifting gears. It makes you focus on following through straight, plus your eyes have longer to focus on the object ball. During your pause, your mind brings up the complete image of how hard etc. you are going to hit the shot. Remember, everyone pauses, even the slightest, I just find that it helps settle me down.

The longer I play in a tournament, the slower I play, or at least it seems that way. I find also that near the end of the day I am holding the cue with no pressure and my arm just glides. I am going to guess that when you go tense, your grip unconsciously gets tight in some way, or your arm muscles get tense. You can mentally beat this by talking to your arm and telling it to be loose as a we noodle. IF YOU ARE LOOSE, YOU WILL NOT CHOKE. This is something you can control. You need to work on key things to say to yourself to go into a relaxed state - a semi zone if you will.

Good luck, and cheers!

Billy_Bob
10-18-2004, 09:05 AM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote Karatemom:</font><hr>...I missed the damn 8 ball so bad it was pathetic... <hr /></blockquote>

I almost had a perfect 50 score for 5 BCA games... Except I missed on the eight ball because I was so nervous with that last shot. Ok so I say to myself that I am not good enough to get a perfect 50 yet, but it will come and I will have other opportunities, so no big deal...

Anyway I got some good advice about these situations. That is to have a pre-shot routine, then breathe out before pulling the trigger, then stay down for 4 seconds after each shot.

So I can be thinking... Ok this is it! If I make this shot, I will have a perfect 50! Everybody is watching me! Boy I better not miss! Man am I nervous! Is my heart OK, it sure is going fast! (Then I miss my shot)

Or I can be thinking... Is that aim correct, let's double check. Is my arm bent? Is my grip relaxed. Then think about breathing out before pulling the trigger. Then think about staying down for 4 seconds after shooting. (Then hey! I wasn't thinking about the pressure, I was thinking about my shot routine instead, and being as I can only think about one thing at a time, I *couldn't* think about the pressure! I make my shot...)

Ross
10-18-2004, 09:29 AM
Heidi, do you have a "calm down ritual?" As I'm sure you know, many players including the top pros will go to their table and powder their hands and cue shaft or take a rag and slowly and deliberately wipe down their cue when facing a pressure situation. They do this just to give their body time to calm down and relax. I think the ritual nature of the routine helps - it relaxes the mind. By focusing on the cleaning the shaft or whatever you are able to give your brain a little bit of a break from all of the hard work it is doing at the table. I know Neils Feijen (sorry to mention his name Chris - /ccboard/images/graemlins/smirk.gif ) takes his cue over to the table and rolls the shaft in powder when he is facing a pressure shot. And he stills gets nervous even though he's played in hundreds of major tournaments over many years. So it's not easy to just make the nerves go away. You may have to "allow for them" rather than just tell them to go away, if that makes any sense.

woody_968
10-18-2004, 10:19 AM
Playing the table and not thinking about what is at stake is always good advise, but is often very hard to do. Really the only way to truely get over it is to get in that type of environment as often as possible.

You will always feel this way, it just lessens as you get used to it. So IMO you must learn to LOVE feeling this way!!! Lets face it, the reason we all practice and play so often is to hopefully put ourselves in the situations you are talking about. So when it happens I think to myself this is the feeling I have been working so hard to get, then it becomes an "I got myself here" instead of a "what am I doing here" type feeling.

That may sound a little strange, but it just may work /ccboard/images/graemlins/grin.gif

Sid_Vicious
10-18-2004, 10:48 AM
"Playing the table and not thinking about what is at stake is always good advise, but is often very hard to do."

Bravo! Nothing against the promotion of "not thinking about the outcome" theory, but it is something that even the professionals still wrestle with, cuz when that cincher is looming and the payoff is there for the taking, I've seen about everyone of them get into some level of paralysis, and depending on their past dealings with this pressure, they either do something fundamentally wrong and dog-it or else they succeed, and some the successes needlessly bang two tits on the way down,,,,nerves. What you have to do to beat the pressure is to find as many opportunities to play under the pressure. I truly believe that anyone(at least me anyways) who tries to tell themselves to "not think about the outcome" has just reinforced the thought of what the situation means, it ain't likely to work, you're many times self-screwed already.

As far as missing that 8-ball miserably when it really counted, try setting your chalk down and slowly circling the entire table and calm down your mind chatter. You'll see a whole different outcome in most cases(IMO) sid

Fred Agnir
10-18-2004, 11:23 AM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote Karatemom:</font><hr> Except that the whole match, especially the hill-hill game, it started again. Cold hands, heart pounding so hard I thought I was going to faint. I missed the damn 8 ball so bad it was pathetic. Needless to say, I took 3rd, not what I intended.

My problem is, how on earth do I calm myself down during these times? Anyone got any tips I can try. BTW, beer does help a little, but not enough, LOL.
<hr /></blockquote> I'm guessing that the first time you played in a tournament or competition, you had the same nervousness. And that now, by and large, you don't have that nervousness. Difference is that you've "been there and done that" enough that you know what to expect.

Now that your improved game has elevated such that you're getting into situations that you many not have been in before, the nervousness arises. Not everyone gets as nervous as the next. We are all individuals after all. What is constant is that the more you put yourself in that situation, the more comfortable you will be, and the less nervous you'll get. So, keep putting yourself in that situation.

There is no one magic thought or breathing that helps everyone in every situation. If you're concentrating on breathing, then you're taking away parts of your mental game that are supposed to be 100% on playing game at hand.

Work through it. Work with it. Embrace the feeling. If you're not feeling nervous, then you're not feeling the game.

Fred

P.S. Unless it's truly an anxiety or panic disorder that should be discussed with your physician.

DSAPOLIS
10-18-2004, 03:59 PM
I Have several articles that deal with this issue at my web site
www.geocities.com/blkjackds12 (http://www.geocities.com/blkjackds12)

The more you deal with pressure the better you will react to it, or learn from it.

Hope all are doing well. I will be relocating to Florida soon. I can still be contacted via my web site.

Good Luck and God Bless
Blackjack

Barbara
10-18-2004, 04:21 PM
Hey Dave!!

Glad to have you around again!! Hope all is well with you and don't be a stranger!!

Barbara

Chris Cass
10-19-2004, 01:14 PM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote Ross:</font><hr> I know Neils Feijen (sorry to mention his name Chris - /ccboard/images/graemlins/smirk.gif ) <hr /></blockquote>

Hi Ross,

Why would you think that mentioning Niels name would bother me? Don't feel bad about my loss to him in the least. I actually feel pretty good when I see his named mentioned. SPetty thought the same with Bobby Pickle. I love the guy. You couldn't find a better opponent that Bobby out there and him and I have made a very good friendship from that day on.

He's never forgotten me either. Matter of fact, that's quite an accomplishment that he does remember me. We were at the gambling tables most of the time before our match even took place. I just think he's one of the best opponents out there, win or lose.

Niels, won't remember me right off the bat. I will tell you at the Open before we started our match he was hitten balls on the table we were about to play on. We both had to wait to play and we're suppose to share rack for rack as it's generally accepted as a form of respect to one another.

Niels, didn't show me that till I stepped up. He sat and watched me sitting there and knew I was his opponent. He was being basically rude by hording the table and forcing me to jump up and tell him I wanted to hit balls. Noone can say, he didn't think of it because it's the first thing you think about when you do see your opponent come in the playing area and set-up.

So, I jumped up after waiting a few racks and then he gave me the table. I assummed that he was going to let me shoot a few racks in a row because, I had let him do so. Time was close to calling the start of the match and I would have only a few minutes to get used to the table.

Well, After I threw out balls and started shooting. I then threw out another few and kept shooting. He jumped up and got all huffy like, it was his turn. I sat and watched him do 3 racks alone. Well, I finished the rack out and let him shoot once more.

Scott, starts annoucing stuff and play was suppose to hold up, Niels stopped. We waited togather and then again we were free to hit some till he reached out table. Scott announced the match and we started.

Niels, was still bothered by the incident prior and it showed the first 3 racks. He started taking 1 full minute per shot. Probably to get to me but it bothered him more than I. After the score was 3-3 and I saw he was shook I thought I had him.

He made a shot and let whitey go. Not to a certain place but in a general area. Mistake. Anyway, it was rolling into the side pocket which would have been perfect for me but it caught a slight kiss off another ball. He got that roll.

He the next rack was still shook even more, after making that mental error in judgement. He then broke, made a ball and was forced to shoot a one/ two combo. He hits it so hard that the 2 ball goes in and the one goes straight back and again, he gets a roll and the 1 ball jars in the corner. Leaving him a shot. If the 1 ball falls? He's got a jump shot on the 3 ball and so close he would have to kick. From there, it was all him. There wasn't anything he could do wrong and he got comfortable and was able to relax.

Still, I don't regret losing. He's a very good shot. A straight shooter with excellent young eyes. His pre-shot routine is extremely mechanical. He played well and I was happy forfilling my obligations to my sponsor in winning 3 games aginst a pro.

I had fun despite what others may have thought. I was in heaven playing. I felt for the first time in my life that I belonged there playing. I suppose DCC is my area of real heaven but I don't know that. I do know that I don't like losing but losing to a respectable opponent means much more than losing to just anyone.

I'll never accept a loss as a final judgement call and I feel I could never be satified till I beat everyone on the planet. In reality, we all know that's what pool players do.

Regards,

C.C.~~ /ccboard/images/graemlins/grin.gif

Chris Cass
10-19-2004, 01:18 PM
Oh David,

I'm so glad to see you respond here once again. I've been thinking about you. Hope your doing well lately.

Regards,

C.C.

Chris Cass
10-19-2004, 01:45 PM
Tell you what Fred,

At another tourney she had to play this one girl. This girl lives to dress dead like Jeanette Lee. Down to the T. The girls on Heide' team all was telling her before the match how this girl is so intimidating.

Heide gets up to play her and this girl has nothing on Heide. Heide is knocked into the loser bracket by this girl after her teammates told her that making her nervous before the match.

Heide, comes through the loser bracket and wins every match and meets the girl in the finals. Race to 3 Heide, wins all 3 games straight. Running out everytime she got up. The next set Heide gets her 2-0 and took one shot she shouldn't have but, it would have given her the win had she made it.

I clearly seen a safe would have given Heide an easier out and guarentee the win. The girl wins the game and Heide lost it all. She went into a comma.

Now, with the Ashton twins. All the hype about them over the board and the AZ site and playing them in the tourney put her right back there again. She had the one sister and had her good. Once she let the inner mind talk to herself. It was all over.

It amazes me that Heide shoots so well. She's come a long way and plays so consistant. Just to let these little mental errors pop up and destroy her. She's not getting beat, she's letting herself get beat. imho

I can't say much because I too have had many issues with tournament play myself. I'm a far better gambler. It's the having to do it right now and then that hits me. I'll go into a talespin if I let myself think of too many things and just shoot. We all have our downfalls and physical is the worst. Mental, cane be just as devistating as well.

I was looking for #### to reply and David was a treat for me. You and the others are so helpful to her and she really needs your advice here. Thank you.

Regards,

C.C.

Rod
10-19-2004, 02:58 PM
[ QUOTE ]
The thing most might not recognize is the muscle end of it. When going into your back swing the muscle tends to lock up if it's drawn back too quickly then when you propell the cue forward the sudden jerk between the two directions will, be hard to control. A slow back swing will let the muscle relax and not tense up therefore you'll be able to deliver a straight follow-through. <hr /></blockquote>

Yes it sure will Chris then when, not if, it locks up the upper arm can start forward with the lower arm. Everything goes to pot then, body moves and so does your head, not to mention accuracy and most likely a weak delivered stroke.

With my thought of finish your backswing I automatically hold the cue lighter. It's like another side benefit.

Rod

Ross
10-19-2004, 04:26 PM
Chris, the only reason I mentioned "sorry" about bringing up Niels was because you had posted before that you thought he could have been a little classier when he played you at the Open.

Actually, I've followed Niels for about four years now, ever since he passed through my area on his first road trip across the US and played and beat a very strong local player - a former pro. This pro was impressed that Niels didn't try to hide his game and felt he handled himself with class. The next time I came across him was when he was still an unknown and gambling at Q-Masters in, I think, 2000. He won me some money when I bet on the side against the local hotshot.

Of course none of this excuses Niels for being rude to you, but my general impression is that he is usually a pretty nice guy, but a bit prone to nerves and overthinking things at the pool table. I know he can be infuriatingly slow as a result. I found his diary at his website ( http://www.nielsfeijen.nl/ )pretty interesting since he opens up about his frustrations when playing Earl and Bustamante at the Open.

GStrong
10-19-2004, 09:15 PM
There is a book called, "Pleasures of Small Motions", by Bob Fancher, PHD. To me, this book covers the mental side of pool better than anything I have ever read. It is actually somewhat contradictory to some of the advice given here, (not that all of it isn't great), but it is definitely worth a read. Someone on this website suggested it to me several months ago and I picked it up fairly cheap on Amazon. Take Care, Gary

Chris Cass
10-19-2004, 11:32 PM
Hi Ross,

Not to highjack my wifes thread but as far as Niels goes. Many times in life we have only our first impression of people. That's always a tough place to be sometimes. Especially when things like competition come into play.

I try my best not to judge the total person by one meeting or one time in competition with them. I know myself that sometimes things don't appear to come off the way you might intend them to do so, as far as Niels goes. I'll judge him the next time we play against one another.

Regards,

C.C.~~all over and doesn't sweat the small stuff. /ccboard/images/graemlins/smirk.gif

Stretch
10-20-2004, 01:53 PM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote Karatemom:</font><hr> Maybe the subject of this post should be Not being able to deal with pressure, LOL. By pressure, I mean in a tournament playing for the winner of the winner's bracket, or the match you need to win to get into the dough. I do realize that every match should be played like it is the one and only match you get, but try to go with the flow here.

My game has finally broken out of it's slump, and even I can see major improvements in it. Now I've come across another barrier. At the Midwest Expo/Open, I lost to Bev Ashton fair and square, hill-hill. I got on a ball bad, hit just a touch too soft, and she got out. Okay, I'm in the loser's bracket, damnit, and who do I draw but her sister, Joann. The match against Joann was the match I needed to win to get into the money. My hands got very cold, couldn't make two balls in a row, my heart was beating out of my chest. I figured it was because it was such a big event for me, and Joann was very well known. Oh well, blew it off and didn't think too much about it until yesterday.

Leisure Time had a benefit tournament to raise the reward money for a woman who was murdered over a year ago. There were 8 women in the tournament, none to be taken lightly. TV cameras and everything were there, but they didn't seem to phase me. Until I got to the winner of the winner's bracket match. I had to play a local woman. My game was fine, made a few mistakes, but nothing I couldn't overcome. Except that the whole match, especially the hill-hill game, it started again. Cold hands, heart pounding so hard I thought I was going to faint. I missed the damn 8 ball so bad it was pathetic. Needless to say, I took 3rd, not what I intended.

My problem is, how on earth do I calm myself down during these times? Anyone got any tips I can try. BTW, beer does help a little, but not enough, LOL.

TIA,

Heide <hr /></blockquote>

Heidi, how's it goin? just droped in to say hi. My dinasour dialup would explode if i tryed to read all the other posts on this, but i'll plow right ahead anyway.

You said yourself that this 'nerve attack' happened AFTER you reolized you were in the Money Match (great playing by the way), but that's what happened. You syced yourself out and the nerves hit. No problem, everyone has done that. Some people call that choking but that's a little crass. It's just a case of shooting, or a shot, below your standard. You made refferance to your stroke when your nerves hit. I wouldn't get freeked out or try to "fix" anything with your stroke, if it's good enough on the practice table, it's good enough in the game. Srokes don't break down under pressure, people do. Here's the thing about pressure. It get's us nervous, pumped up, heart pounding....I LOVE IT!! If pool didn't give me a huge charge it wouldn't be near so gratifying. That's why we compete isn't it? To get that rush. What would you rather do, go out in the evening and get into an awsome matchup, or stay at home and do the dishes.....exactly! the reason why you play pool, is because it makes you nervous! That's the coolest reason there is. The adrenalin actualy inhances your mental game and keeps you focused. When your too relaxed "that's" when you get distracted by negative thoughts like being in the money, who you'll play next round, how great your opponents playing, that sort of thing.

So instead of finding ways to still the trembling hand, or slow the heart down. Accept it, That's what can happen. Use the adrenalin to focus the mind to block out distractions, attend to your routine and strategy just as you do all the time at the practice table. Your body can and probably will stay excited, but the mind must not. You've seen Nick Varner shoot. He shakes like a friggin leaf. i don't know how he dosn't drop the cue. But we all know his game right? A shake means nothing if your mind is clear.

Now haveing said all that. If you still need to steady yourself for a shot, or to calm down. Nothing beats some deep breaths and slow exhale, take a leasurly stroll around the table, make your mind up, commit, and go into your shot routine. As the runnout progresses instead of getting all uptight the closer you get to the nine strive to become looser, more free, and confident with each passing ball. By the time you face the 9 you'll be in full flow. /ccboard/images/graemlins/smile.gif St

#### leonard
10-21-2004, 12:15 PM
Chris sorry I have been delinquent. I wanted to say that women can do this better than men. I have alwys maintained that your turn at the pooltable should resemble a dance routine. Once you Choreagraph your dance routine, keep your inner voice quiet and let the Dance Begin.

I found that by concentrating on your breathing pattern you have quieted your brain. It Can only do on thing at a time. Thank God.####

JimS
10-21-2004, 05:15 PM
Deep breaths, through the nose, exhaling very slowing to a count of 4 (like the 4 stroke). The tension will flow out of the neck, chest, shoulders, arms and cue-grip-fingers especiall! Let the tension flow out with the exhale and cradle that puppy like a butterfly.

I like to time things so I breath in during the backswing then hold my breath while the stroke pauses and while the stroke proceeds forward and until the ball goes in the hole or the cue ball stops....then breath in and do a sub-conscious count to 4 breathing in and 4 exhaling all the while I'm standing and "seeing" the next shot and shape. /ccboard/images/graemlins/cool.gif

Rod
10-21-2004, 05:28 PM
Jeeze Jim I might pass out from all of that breathing! I might even forget whether I need to inhale or exhale, LOL

rod, easily confused

Voodoo Daddy
10-22-2004, 05:50 AM
Time to toss the hat in...Heide, you paid your fee to "play" in the tournament or "perform" in the tournament? If your the latter your there for the wrong reason. During a match, money, tournament or otherwise I feel that self-gratification is the one of the three reasons I play. If your getting nervous, your not really enjoying the moment thus taking away a reason your there.

Second reason &lt;for me&gt; is not to measure my talent/skill/luck against my opponent but to test what has been worked on since my last match's mentally. The table is your true opponent and has no emotion...it just allows you to "test" yourself. The human factor &lt;opponent&gt; should not make you nervous, clamy handed or anything like that...BECAUSE they really dont have too much to say in the outcome of your inning at the table.

Lastly, the third reason is a from my playbook. I shoot the balls like my life depends on it... and failure is not an option. If this reason makes your hands sweaty or your heart race then this menatlity is not for you but it seemed to work for me...good luck KarateMom, I know you'll kick ass!!!


Voodoo~~~typed way too much

BCgirl
10-22-2004, 11:41 AM
Ooh! I share your pain. Dumped by the Ashton sister tag team. The second match is the hardest. You can't fight deja-vu!

Well, you could run to the ladies room, scream, and take it out on the bemused boyfriend. Done that ... sorry Frank!

Some people say you should always have a positive attitude to your opponent's play. In other words, watch the table, choose the shots, and analyse the rack, not how much better she's playing than you think you are. If you can watch someone running racks on you without ruining your hairdo, or your nails, you're stronger than I am.

But, you could try taking some yoga and meditation classes. It's nice to be able to consciously relax and focus yourself regardless of the state of play. I find that I'm much less tense and edgy if I can maintain the right mind-set in this way.

The other big key is your pre-shot routine. Look at the silly things some of the best players do. Johnny Archer will pick and fuss at the cloth like an old woman, move the chalk like chess pieces, and re-arrange balls in pockets. He's hilarious, a real nervous nellie, but it sure works.

I used to make up an acronym for all the little things you need to keep in mind : options, shot selection, visualisation, aim, speed, execute, observation. But, I'm a little over-analytical at times, and I ran out of letters :-) I'm sure that you can find something that works.

BCgirl

Terry
10-23-2004, 02:58 AM
Hi Heidi,

I think your giving your opponents too much respect, not that they don't deserve it, it's just the wrong time to give it to them during your match. If you don't know the name or repretation of your opponent you shoot your game so theirs what needs to be addressed. I had my daughter to the Eastern Canadians a couple of weeks ago and she just turned 15 and was playing in the womens division, she was getting ready to play the top player there, a lady who came 3rd at the Canadians only my daughter didn't know that and I didn't tell her. They were tied 5-5 in a race to 7 before the other lady won the last two games for the win, the point is my daughter played her game and got beat by a better player while playing her own game and theirs nothing wrong with that because she had no fear of her opponent. I didn't tell her who she played until we were home a couple of days so I could explain to her that that's the way to compete by playing YOUR GAME and don't be thinking of your opponent thats the mistake so many players make, I know.LOL. Best of luck, Terry