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View Full Version : Absoloutely Amazing.....



nhp
10-23-2004, 07:25 AM
So I finally decided to take a required Astronomy class this semester. I figured it was gonna be boring crap. Turns out this stuff is amazing. Of course I already had a general idea that the earth is just a speck of dust in the universe, but to actually learn about this stuff, it's quite breathtaking. One thing that I learned many years ago is about how the light from the stars that we see today is light from millions of years ago. That was elaborated in my class. It's incredible- When you look up at the sky at night time, you are looking at something that doesn't even exist anymore. A very large percent of the stars that we see are now gone, but the light from millions of years ago is barely reaching us. For those of you who don't know this, here is how it breaks down: A light year is the distance light travels in 1 year. Say a star is 100 million light years away- That means that the light we are seeing from it now is 100 million years old. In actuality, when you look at a star, you are looking back in time- millions and millions of years ago. You can look at a star, but it doesn't even exist anymore, because it died already, but you are only seeing the light it generated now.

I find it absoloutely astounding that there are people who don't believe there is life on other planets, somewhere out there in the entire universe. Please tell me, if we can find bacteria on Mars, which is just a planet in our solar system, why wouldn't you believe that with the trillions upon quadrillions upon sextillions of other galaxies containing trillions upon trillions of stars and planets, that there is no other life out there? I think that is just being close-minded and ignorant, and probably too scared to contemplate that.

With all the problems going on in our world today, it's funny to just think in retrospect that we are nothing but a speck of dust in the universe, and that nothing we do has any effect on the rest of the universe.

wow

Wally_in_Cincy
10-23-2004, 07:28 AM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote nhp:</font><hr>

...I find it absoloutely astounding that there are people who don't believe there is life on other planets,...

<hr /></blockquote>

I also find it astounding that there are people who do not believe there is a God. /ccboard/images/graemlins/smile.gif

Popcorn
10-23-2004, 10:47 AM
I don't, Never did.

Wally_in_Cincy
10-23-2004, 10:55 AM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote Popcorn:</font><hr> I don't, Never did. <hr /></blockquote>

To each his own /ccboard/images/graemlins/smile.gif

Popcorn
10-23-2004, 12:03 PM
Exactly, it is not necessary for others to believe as we do to validate our own beliefs. I was very glad to read your response. "To each his own" would sure solve a lot of problems in this world.

Popcorn
10-23-2004, 12:07 PM
Kind of shoots holes in astrology. They are plotting stars that are either somewhere else or not really there at all.

dg-in-centralpa
10-23-2004, 12:22 PM
Astronomy was always one of my favorite subjects. I had two different teachers and they made it a whole lot of fun. This can be a dry subject if not done right. I love to sit out at night and just watch the stars.

DG

Popcorn
10-23-2004, 01:02 PM
The first time you really see them away from city lights is amazing. I remember the first night I spent in the desert looking up and I could just not stop looking. You could actually see the Milky way

dg-in-centralpa
10-23-2004, 01:58 PM
Where I live now, there is very little light pollution. One exceptionally clear night, I was sitting out with wifey and was reminded of the line from 2001," My God, It's full of stars."

DG - made me feel real insignificant

nhp
10-23-2004, 05:20 PM
Seeing stars out in the desert is nothing compared to being out in the middle of the ocean on a clear night. You will see twice as many stars out in the middle of the ocean than you will in the desert.

landshark77
10-23-2004, 06:04 PM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote nhp:</font><hr>
Please tell me, if we can find bacteria on Mars, which is just a planet in our solar system, why wouldn't you believe that with the trillions upon quadrillions upon sextillions of other galaxies containing trillions upon trillions of stars and planets, that there is no other life out there? I think that is just being close-minded and ignorant, and probably too scared to contemplate that.

<hr /></blockquote>

A few years ago didn't we discover a new planet that was not in our solar system?

And for the record...I believe there is life out there, but I also feel that we should be ethical with our discovery of said life and what ever knowledge we learn. (Oh, nooo! /ccboard/images/graemlins/shocked.gif She said ethical...is this gonna cause another debate?)

eg8r
10-24-2004, 05:40 AM
[ QUOTE ]
You will see twice as many stars out in the middle of the ocean than you will in the desert. <hr /></blockquote> Why?

eg8r

Chopstick
10-24-2004, 06:42 AM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote landshark77:</font><hr>

A few years ago didn't we discover a new planet that was not in our solar system?

<hr /></blockquote>

Yea, a bunch of them. Just gas giants so far. They are big and reflect light better than rock planets. I haven't heard of any solid ones yet.

Chopstick
10-24-2004, 06:59 AM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote nhp:</font><hr>

It's incredible- When you look up at the sky at night time, you are looking at something that doesn't even exist anymore.

<hr /></blockquote>

Well, this ought to really twist your melon. Look across the room. It's the same effect. You are seeing what was there a fraction of a second ago.

Check out this months Special Edition of Scientific American. "The Secret Lives of Stars." It's a must have for the coffee table.

If you have the chance, look up the new membrane theory. You might want to bone up on what's going on now in quantum mechanics to get a handle on it.

Fair_Play
10-24-2004, 08:19 PM
A fine hello nhp! /ccboard/images/graemlins/grin.gif

As army aviation guys, we spent quite a bit of time flying in the desert (Ft. Irwin) at night.. of course, we wore NVG's (Night Vision Goggles)... what a trip that is, you see stars like unreal because of the light amplification, more stars than you can dream about, absolutely incredible.. that is one thing I miss about not flying - but then, tanks are a different sort of fun!

Pardon, but it kinda makes politics seem like a fart in a windstorm... /ccboard/images/graemlins/crazy.gif

Good luck with your course, you already have the priceless gift of enthusiasm!!!! /ccboard/images/graemlins/cool.gif

Fair Pay agrees: 'to each his own' /ccboard/images/graemlins/grin.gif /ccboard/images/graemlins/smile.gif /ccboard/images/graemlins/smile.gif /ccboard/images/graemlins/grin.gif

hondo
10-25-2004, 05:40 AM
[I agree with both of you.

quote=Wally_in_Cincy] <blockquote><font class="small">Quote nhp:</font><hr>

...I find it absoloutely astounding that there are people who don't believe there is life on other planets,...

<hr /></blockquote>

I also find it astounding that there are people who do not believe there is a God. /ccboard/images/graemlins/smile.gif <hr /></blockquote>

cheesemouse
10-25-2004, 06:29 AM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote eg8r:</font><hr> &lt;/font&gt;&lt;blockquote&gt;&lt;font class="small"&gt;Quote:&lt;/font&gt;&lt;hr /&gt;
You will see twice as many stars out in the middle of the ocean than you will in the desert. <hr /></blockquote> Why?

eg8r <hr /></blockquote>

Come on Ed, it's because there are more stars over the ocean than there are over the dessert...geezzzzzz /ccboard/images/graemlins/grin.gif

Wally_in_Cincy
10-25-2004, 07:14 AM
The best place I ever saw stars was on a houseboat on the immense Lake Cumberland in the boonies of Central Kentucky in September. You could see satellites going overhead and a shooting star every few minutes.

cheesemouse
10-25-2004, 11:08 AM
Wally,

Mine was on top of Mt Hebo on the coast of Oregon back in 68, we were on top of the dome that covered a hugh radar sail...I can't remember what we were smoking....LOL /ccboard/images/graemlins/tongue.gif

Deeman2
10-25-2004, 11:24 AM
Midnight on Mt. Evans in about 1970. I believe in God but respect those who don't as I had to learn myself.

There are more stars in each galaxy than grains of sand on the earth and more galaxies than grains of sand on the earth and it cost $49.95 to get a single star named after you! Who gave them the right to name stars anyway! *(National Star Registry).

I could start a rant here but I won't. However, it's kinda funny that science's explaination of the beginning has more holes than any phylosophycal expaination and but they just won't consider divine a intellegence as a possibility. Strange....

Deeman

has a star with his name on it....

cheesemouse
10-25-2004, 11:48 AM
[ QUOTE ]
There are more stars in each galaxy than grains of sand on the earth and more galaxies than grains of sand on the earth and it cost $49.95 to get a single star named after you! Who gave them the right to name stars anyway! *(National Star Registry).
<hr /></blockquote>

Deeman, can I get a galaxy for less than a $100....CHEESEMOUSE GALAZY...I like the sound of that... /ccboard/images/graemlins/grin.gif /ccboard/images/graemlins/grin.gif

cheesy believes in intellegence not dogma...

Deeman2
10-25-2004, 12:50 PM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote cheesemouse:</font><hr> &lt;/font&gt;&lt;blockquote&gt;&lt;font class="small"&gt;Quote:&lt;/font&gt;&lt;hr /&gt;
There are more stars in each galaxy than grains of sand on the earth and more galaxies than grains of sand on the earth and it cost $49.95 to get a single star named after you! Who gave them the right to name stars anyway! *(National Star Registry).
<hr /></blockquote>

Deeman, can I get a galaxy for less than a $100....CHEESEMOUSE GALAZY...I like the sound of that... /ccboard/images/graemlins/grin.gif /ccboard/images/graemlins/grin.gif

cheesy believes in intellegence not dogma... <hr /></blockquote>

Cheese:

Maybe we can sell them. I mean, who's going to go check on the property? Could advertise plenty of parking, no close neighbors, etc. However, I would load up on dogma before making the trip. /ccboard/images/graemlins/smirk.gif

Deeman

cheesemouse
10-25-2004, 02:04 PM
[ QUOTE ]

Cheese:

Maybe we can sell them. I mean, who's going to go check on the property? Could advertise plenty of parking, no close neighbors, etc. However, I would load up on dogma before making the trip. /ccboard/images/graemlins/smirk.gif <hr /></blockquote>


Deeman2,

Maybe we could promote it by holding the first annual GALATIC DOGMA OPEN 9-BALL:
&lt;Flip for the break
&lt;Race to infinity (no slow play)
&lt;Ask for special rates (no refunds) /ccboard/images/graemlins/grin.gif

Wally_in_Cincy
10-26-2004, 05:25 AM
My dogma got run over by my karma

TomBrooklyn
10-26-2004, 09:31 AM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote cheesemouse:</font><hr>Deeman, can I get a galaxy for less than a $100...<hr /></blockquote>You want a whole galaxy with billions of stars for $100, when a single star is going for $49.95 now? What do you plan on doing? Reselling individual stars at cut rate prices and flooding the market? You'll ruin the whole business. Maybe for a $1000 you can get a whole galaxy that you can barely see with the Hubble telescope.

TomBrooklyn
10-26-2004, 09:37 AM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote Chopstick:</font><hr> Well, this ought to really twist your melon. ...look up the new membrane theory. You might want to bone up... <hr /></blockquote>He's got a melon? Maybe this ought to be posted in the Pumpkin thread. (http://www.billiardsdigest.com/ccboard/showthreaded.php?Cat=&amp;Board=npr&amp;Number=161236&amp;page =0&amp;view=collapsed&amp;sb=5&amp;o=93&amp;vc=1)