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JimS
10-24-2004, 06:28 PM
I've got a cue with a leather grip that I'd like to make slicker.

Any suggestions?

The cue is old and pretty beat up and I don't care too much about the cosmetics...just the feel. I want it to slide through my hand better on the follow thru. The way it is now it kinda grabs.

Car wax? Karseal? Lighter fluid?

Bob_Jewett
10-24-2004, 07:47 PM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote JimS:</font><hr> I've got a cue with a leather grip that I'd like to make slicker. ... Car wax? Karseal? Lighter fluid? <hr /></blockquote>
Don't use regular leather wax -- the resulting finish is quite sticky (which is actually what I want). I think the problem is that a dry and slippery finish will also cause the leather to degrade.

Do you use a slip stroke?

JimS
10-24-2004, 07:51 PM
Bob, I've always been a little confused about what exactly a "slip-stroke" is.

I let the cue go during the follow through...that is I sort of throw the cue at the shot letting it slide through my grip hand. If that's a slip stroke then I uses one /ccboard/images/graemlins/smile.gif

I had tried regular leather cleaner and conditioner prior to asking for help and it was those attempts to produce a slicker grip that caused me to ask for advice.

Since I started this thread I tried some Cue Glide and it worked pretty well.

Bob_Jewett
10-24-2004, 10:05 PM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote JimS:</font><hr>...
I let the cue go during the follow through...that is I sort of throw the cue at the shot letting it slide through my grip hand. If that's a slip stroke then I uses one /ccboard/images/graemlins/smile.gif <hr /></blockquote>
Many people feel that this is a really, really bad habit to develop, although others think it's a good idea. Do you have a particular reason for doing this?

JimS
10-25-2004, 04:59 AM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote Bob_Jewett:</font><hr> <blockquote><font class="small">Quote JimS:</font><hr>...
I let the cue go during the follow through...that is I sort of throw the cue at the shot letting it slide through my grip hand. If that's a slip stroke then I uses one /ccboard/images/graemlins/smile.gif <hr /></blockquote>
Many people feel that this is a really, really bad habit to develop, although others think it's a good idea. Do you have a particular reason for doing this? <hr /></blockquote>

Hmmm. Trying to remember how it got started. I think I started doing that in response to a thread here a couple/three years back. I think that the reason I started doing it had to do with achieving a straighter stroke...insuring no wrist twist at the end...but I'm not really sure why I started doing it. Very light grip seemed to be involved in this idea. Vague memories here.

Do to personal and business bothers I've been on a pool hiatus for about a year unitl about a week ago and have forgotten some of the things I was working on last winter. NOW, since you've awakened that part portion of my brain cells, /ccboard/images/graemlins/tongue.gif I remember that last winter I was experimenting on getting more wrist action into my stroke so that I could achieve more power with fewer large muscles being involved and was working on not "letting the cue go." I wonder now which way I should go.

I gather that you are in the camp that does not think that "throwing the cue" is not among the best techniques.

I would appreciate anything you feel like you can contribute here as I respect your knowledgeable opinions.

Deeman2
10-25-2004, 06:07 AM
When I played Mr. Jimmy Moore many years ago in Las Vegas, he had this type of stroke and it was a thing of beauty. However, I tried it for a while after that and never could control it enough to make it worthwhile. I guess some guys just make it a natural part of their stroke. I couldn't.

The bad thing is I went to a "death grip" after trying this so I think maybe the "thought" of a slip stroke, to keep a looser grip, is better for me than the actual thing.

If it works for you, great. It worked for Mr. Moore.


Deeman

tateuts
10-25-2004, 09:57 AM
Jim,

Making the grip slicker is not hard but you need to spin the cue. A cue maker can buff out the leather for you - I don't know what they use but they can polish it up super smooth or make it dull. Probably buffing compound.

For a new wrap, Proficient Billiards will put on a slick new leather wrap for $95 and it's a fine job. The guy I like the most is Huebler for slick leather - they'll do it too.

For slip stroking, when I used to do it (I don't anymore) I prefer linen.

Chris

#### leonard
10-25-2004, 10:36 AM
If my memory serves me Irving Crane threw his cue while Willie Mosconi slipped stroke only two or three inches not like Jimmy Moore and Ralph Greenleaf side armed the cue.####

bsmutz
10-25-2004, 11:46 AM
A good quality leather cleaner and conditioner from the auto parts store should work perfect.

JimS
10-25-2004, 12:16 PM
Thanks Chris. I tried spraying with WD 40. I swear it works great. Buffed it with towel and it worked great /ccboard/images/graemlins/cool.gif

#### Leonard...deeman...others?

Thanks for your help...
As for the slip grip. Sounds like I'm in good company but First: Am I right that letting the cue slide in my hand is a slip grip?

Second: does it work, which is best, according to whom???? Is it mostly preference and opinion? What method is most likely to produce the seamless stroke that produces better accuracy and cue ball control? Seems like that should be another thread. I'll do a search first and depending on the results it may be time to re-visit that topic.

Deeman2
10-25-2004, 12:35 PM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote JimS:</font><hr> Thanks Chris. I tried spraying with WD 40. I swear it works great. Buffed it with towel and it worked great /ccboard/images/graemlins/cool.gif

#### Leonard...deeman...others?

Thanks for your help...
As for the slip grip. Sounds like I'm in good company but First: Am I right that letting the cue slide in my hand is a slip grip?

Second: does it work, which is best, according to whom???? Is it mostly preference and opinion? What method is most likely to produce the seamless stroke that produces better accuracy and cue ball control? Seems like that should be another thread. I'll do a search first and depending on the results it may be time to re-visit that topic. <hr /></blockquote>

Jims. As I said, I think it is a good stroke but I just did not have the natural tallent to use it properly. The stroke as I understand it, let's the cue slid through the hand, a sort of re-gripping during the stroke. I know that #### Leonard has probably seen more examples of it than any of us as it was more popular in past times. I think anything that brings the cue directly forward in a smooth level fashion is sufficient and the slip stroke just seemed like too much for me to add into my routine.

As far as WD 40, use care as it has silicon in it I believe several have posted on the danger of silicon on the shaft. I do not know as I'm afraid of silicon being from the automotive industry where it is banned like the plague. You can't pain surfaces after silicon has touched them but it may actually do no harm to the cue, I just don't know. I have always thought silicon would be horrible on the tip, if it migrated there as friction is the name of the game. However, I see/hear of guys who can't get a ball to masse using it on a cue ball to get great actions so who really knows? I think even F/L was big proponent of using silicon, but don't hold me to that memory... /ccboard/images/graemlins/cool.gif

Deeman

Rod
10-25-2004, 01:13 PM
Jim to best answer your question you should view a tape of Jimmy Moore, Dallas West or even Roger Griffis. There are others for sure.

Your describing letting the cue slide forwards whether it be before or after impact. A slip stroke is holding the instrument with the bridge hand and sliding the back hand on the cue. The cue never moves until the back hand reaches a point then finish your backswing.

Most slip strokers, which I am, have the back hand forward at address then slide it back to where you normally hold the cue but not always. LOL

By letting the cue slip forward as you do may not involve the arm weight. Arm weight and cue weight at impact I think is essential especially for speed control. If not it serves to deaden the shot and there can be reasons for doing such but it's rarely needed.

I've gotten away from my slip stroke to some degree but I can't say as it helped anything. Rarely my cue will slide forwards (after) impact but it can happen because of a very loose relaxed swing. Personally I'd get away from what your doing and just stay relaxed, nothing more. Habbit's die hard. LOL

BTW this stroke was common with many old timers. It has been passed along through generations but is not very common today. I won't even try to teach such as I think it's better just to keep your hand in one place. The game is diffult enough without variables.

Rod

#### leonard
10-26-2004, 06:41 AM
Jim I will answer your post and what I write could answer all three posts.

Here is what the basic slip stroke does. It changes your HIT IMPULSE. Have you ever watched players veer off at the cueball, well that is the hit impulse. When you set up to the cueball, cuetip near the cueball, that sets in your mind where your stroke hand will be at impact and when your hand arrives there, your mind sends the veer off signal, by slipping back two or three inches when your mind gets the hit impulse you have already hit the ball. This fooling your mind trick helps you to develop a straight stroke and soon you lose your hit impulse but are left with a straight slip stroke.

The other two methods gives the shooter a lighter feel of the cue.When you throw the cue you must learn to catch the ball####

Deeman2
10-26-2004, 09:35 AM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote #### leonard:</font><hr> Jim I will answer your post and what I write could answer all three posts.

Here is what the basic slip stroke does. It changes your HIT IMPULSE. Have you ever watched players veer off at the cueball, well that is the hit impulse. When you set up to the cueball, cuetip near the cueball, that sets in your mind where your stroke hand will be at impact and when your hand arrives there, your mind sends the veer off signal, by slipping back two or three inches when your mind gets the hit impulse you have already hit the ball. This fooling your mind trick helps you to develop a straight stroke and soon you lose your hit impulse but are left with a straight slip stroke.

The other two methods gives the shooter a lighter feel of the cue.When you throw the cue you must learn to catch the ball#### <hr /></blockquote>



####,

Best explaination I ever heard.

Deeman

JimS
10-27-2004, 04:40 AM
Thanks ####. Your explanation created understanding in my thoughts. I appreciate the help....also thanks Rod. Now I see /ccboard/images/graemlins/laugh.gif

I think I"ll go back to holding onto the cue...not throwing it. I like the straightness that I thing throwing it helps insure but I don't feel like I have as much control over it when I throw it.

Chris Cass
10-27-2004, 04:46 AM
I've seen them sanded to a smooth finish and it was slick also. Your leather might be the smooth type already? If it is grained leather or pigskin or some type it could be sanded slightly with some 1000 grit and come out slick and it'll slide like a pressed linen wrap too.

I heard the most interesting thing lately. I heard that some are stamping the pigskin or whatever it is and having stamps that resemble other type of animals like, lizard, snake, and aligater. Is that a pip or what?

Regards,

C.C.

catscradle
10-27-2004, 05:21 AM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote JimS:</font><hr> I've got a cue with a leather grip that I'd like to make slicker.

Any suggestions?

The cue is old and pretty beat up and I don't care too much about the cosmetics...just the feel. I want it to slide through my hand better on the follow thru. The way it is now it kinda grabs.

Car wax? Karseal? Lighter fluid? <hr /></blockquote>

It wouldn't cost an awful lot to just replace the leather with pressed linen which in my experience is slicker than leather.