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View Full Version : The RedSox - A Lesson only a PoolPlayer can teach!



Jude_Rosenstock
10-28-2004, 11:33 AM
Even as a New Yorker, I have to say it is truly remarkable seeing a team come back from an 0-3 hole to win the American League Championship Series and to go on and win the World Series makes it even more special. However, I do have to point out, even though the feat had never been accomplished in Professional Baseball and rarely accomplished in Professional TEAM Sports, such holes are routinely filled in pool.

It is in the make-up of every champion pool player. That inability to accept defeat and to constantly seek the one chance you might need to get back into the set. Only a pool player can scoff at the idea of giving up just because they were down 0-3.

We can't look at any of the time-clock sports. In spite of what Yogi says, when the Lakers lead by 20 with 2 minutes remaining, IT'S OVER. Besides, it's the same damn court with the same damn ball being passed around by the same damn players. You can pretty much say the same thing for hockey and football while you're at it. Only in pool and baseball do the parameters change from game to game. Whether it be the pitcher on the mound or the way the balls spread after the break, things change and the strengths & weaknesses of a player/team are either magnified or hidden. This is why the comeback is possible. Evenso, down 0-3 was a first for the game of baseball in it's 100 years history!

How many times have we seen players in our own room, even ourselves, come back from improbable situations? How many times have we stepped it up? We all sit here and applaud the Red Sox for what they've done but personally, I think baseball players are behind in their lessons. Perhaps they should take a page out of our book and learn how it feels to comeback from 0-4, 0-8 or 0-148! I tip my cap to those self-proclaimed idiots of baseball but they should be thankful that the bigger idiots, the ones that have made comebacks routine, decided to pick up a cue instead!


Jude M. Rosenstock

Chris Cass
10-28-2004, 09:38 PM
Mark Wilson a non touring pro at this time and BCA Qualified instructor had been giving pool lessons to the ST. Louis Cardinals before the series a few mths ago. He was hired by the team to help their players concentrate. Looks like they needed him sooner. /ccboard/images/graemlins/smirk.gif

Regards,

C.C.

Rich R.
10-29-2004, 03:04 AM
Tap, Tap, Tap.

And, as a great New Yorker once said, "It ain't over, until it's over." /ccboard/images/graemlins/grin.gif

JDB
10-29-2004, 06:21 AM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote Jude_Rosenstock:</font><hr> Perhaps they should take a page out of our book and learn how it feels to comeback from 0-4, 0-8 or 0-148! I tip my cap to those self-proclaimed idiots of baseball...
Jude M. Rosenstock <hr /></blockquote>

I think your examples are more equivalent to being down 3 - 0 in the first inning versus being down 3 - 0 in a race to 7 games of baseball. That is a huge difference.

I think everyone in professional sports understands what it is like to come back from a seemingly insurmountable lead in the same game. To get down early and struggle back to win.

JDB
10-29-2004, 07:45 PM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote Jude_Rosenstock:</font><hr>Perhaps they should take a page out of our book and learn how it feels to comeback from 0-4, 0-8 or 0-148! I tip my cap to those self-proclaimed idiots...
Jude M. Rosenstock <hr /></blockquote>

I couldn't think of a good example to contrast against pool this morning when I wrote my reply earlier; however, I think I have come up with something close...

When was the last time someone lost their first match in the US Open and then went on to win the tournament? I think this would be very close to what the Red Sox accomplished.

I don't think this has ever happened before, but I would love to hear about it if it has...

Barbara
10-30-2004, 06:13 AM
jDB,

Jimmy Caras lost his first match of the 1967 US 14.1 Championships to Luther Lassiter only to run through the left side of the chart AND beat Wimpy twice in the finals to win! AND! This was after coming out of "retirement"!!

Talk about a comeback!!

Barbara~~~has a souvenir from that match... /ccboard/images/graemlins/grin.gif

Chris Cass
10-30-2004, 06:45 AM
Jimmy' memory will live on forever. Such a great loss to our sport.

Regards,

C.C.~~Barbara' so luck to have known such a super player.

JDB
10-30-2004, 11:42 AM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote Barbara:</font><hr> jDB,
Jimmy Caras lost his first match of the 1967 US 14.1 Championships to Luther Lassiter only to run through the left side of the chart AND beat Wimpy twice in the finals to win! AND! This was after coming out of "retirement"!!

Talk about a comeback!!

Barbara~~~has a souvenir from that match... /ccboard/images/graemlins/grin.gif <hr /></blockquote>

Now that is an awesome accomplishment!

Keith Talent
10-30-2004, 12:57 PM
Good examples. Anybody could draw some inspiration from the Sox' comeback. Especially in pool, considering the great ebb and flow of most people's games.

Another game where anything's possible, because there's no clock, is tennis. I can think of at least two examples of pro players who were buried in impossible holes in major tournaments -- down 3 match points at 0-40, 0-5 -- and climbed back to win. They were Chandra Rubin, coming back at the French Open a few years ago against notorious choker Jana Novotna; and Manuel Orantes, coming back against Guillermo Vilas at the 1975 U.S. Open (then he beat Jimmy Connors in the final the next day after getting 3 or 4 hours sleep!).

But, amazingly, both of the victims recovered to win Grand Slam titles within a couple of years of those disasters, which proves blowing that kind of match isn't the worst thing that could happen to you. Even for poor Novotna, who broke down in tears after blowing a big lead to Steffi Graf in a Wimbledon final, too.

What I think happens in these situations is a combination of factors ... first, you have one player who refuses to lose, who won't give an inch till after the last shot is played. Which is a great thing to see ... and then, the guy with the lead probably has his victory party before his victory, as tennis guru Brad Gilbert has said, and loses focus. Then, usually, he loses confidence and freezes up altogether as his opponent gets stronger and stronger.

Maybe, in fact, you have to lose the big lead, or miss the crucial shot a couple of times to really learn how to close out matches. On that theme, props to Ga-Young for bouncing back from last year's disaster to make that last ball this year.

PQQLK9
10-30-2004, 02:22 PM
http://www.charlotte.com/images/charlotte/charlotte/5736/32902911032.jpg
When he died that February day at Daytona in 2001, it just didn't seem right.

In many ways, he is still around.

You can't go to Daytona without thinking about Earnhardt finally winning the 500 in 1998. You can't go to Talladega without remembering his last win in 2000, where he came from 18th to first in five unbelievable laps. You can't go to Lowe's Motor Speedway without remembering the "pass in the grass" from The Winston in 1987.

http://www.charlotte.com/mld/charlotte/sports/motorsports/7568459.htm