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GStrong
10-31-2004, 10:35 AM
If y'all wouldn't mind sharing to a novice... How do you burnish you tip and shaft? I've heard undyed leather, but what exactly is the process? Where do you get the leather, can you use a chamois? As for the shaft, what is the process for that? I occasionally use a little piece of 800 grit sand paper and my shaft stays clean and smooth. Any other pointers on "Burnishing" would be appreciated. Thanks. Gary

Chris Cass
10-31-2004, 10:49 AM
Hi GStrong,

Burnishing is the coolest thing since the micro-miniskirt. /ccboard/images/graemlins/grin.gif It not only seals in the fine hand oils into the shaft wood but keeps the tip leather tight and firm. Stops mushrooming of the tip and makes it look pretty too.

It's great for those of us that require something to get our minds away from a bad shot. Also, helps share the blame when you do make one. You can just look at the tip and as your oponent looks at you along with everyone else that can't see how you missed. They'll get the idea, "Hey, his tips messed up." lol

Have a great day and BTW, were all students a novice to me means that your thinking about trying to do this shooting thing more than once a yr. /ccboard/images/graemlins/grin.gif

Regards,

C.C.~~ /ccboard/images/graemlins/grin.gif

Billy_Bob
10-31-2004, 10:49 AM
If you use sandpaper frequently on your shaft, you will wind up with a toothpick! Only use sandpaper rarely.

To get leather, I went to a second hand store and found an old purse for $2. Old natural leather boots work too. Then just cut off a piece about 4" x 4" and stroke the shaft up and down and rotate the shaft. Do this until it gets warm. (I use denatured alcohol to clean the shaft every few days. Gets the oil from my hands off, then I burnish it with the leather.)

For the tip sides, just rotate the shaft around while holding the leather to the tip sides. The tip sides will get shiny. You can also wet your finger and moisten the edges of the tip after burnishing.

ras314
10-31-2004, 10:56 AM
I've been using layered tips and see no need for burnishing them. Lately I've been using a micro-fiber cloth to wipe down the shaft, if held tight and rubbed rapidly the shaft will get warm as if it were being burnished. I think it also helps keep it clean.

I would use finer than 800 grit and then only if there were already scratches on the shaft.

Troy
10-31-2004, 10:58 AM
I went to a local shoe repair shop and asked for a small piece of un-dyed leather. The guy gave me a piece about 4"x6" and I cut off a 1"x3" strip.

Before getting a lathe I would spin the shaft against my leg with one hand (no jokes please /ccboard/images/graemlins/smile.gif ) holding the leather around the tip with the other hand. Moisten the edge of the tip (I use saliva) and spin away.

Burnishing the shaft is the same process but without the moisture. I use Ronsonol® Lighter fluid to clean the shaft first.

Troy
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote GStrong:</font><hr> If y'all wouldn't mind sharing to a novice... How do you burnish you tip and shaft? I've heard undyed leather, but what exactly is the process? Where do you get the leather, can you use a chamois? As for the shaft, what is the process for that? I occasionally use a little piece of 800 grit sand paper and my shaft stays clean and smooth. Any other pointers on "Burnishing" would be appreciated. Thanks. Gary <hr /></blockquote>

Chris Cass
10-31-2004, 11:00 AM
Geez, Billy,

I thought he was talking about tips and why? My bad.

C.C.

Chris Cass
10-31-2004, 11:06 AM
I must have misunderstood the post about the leather. I burnish my tip usually on a formica bar table rail. I'll wet the sides with some spit and as I'm mving the shaft back and forth sideways on the rail. I'll rotate the shaft with my back hand. I never did like the feel of burnishing the shaft with leather but some do. I like the oils from my hand to build up in the shaft wood. It appears highly polished. Sometimes when it does get too gritty feeling from the chalk dust which builds up too. Which is very hard to avoid. I'll use a damp paper towel and burnish it with the same towel till dry.

Don't sand if you can help it. After time the shaft wears down just from play but sanding although sometime required from cleaning and ding removal if done too much will cost you not only in size but will effect your play too.

Regards,

C.C.

sixa
10-31-2004, 05:37 PM
I got one of these from ebay.

http://www.tigerproducts.com/LEDRburnisher.htm

I use that on the shaft, but on my tip it doesn't do much. To burnish my tip I use a pool ball and rub it up and down on the sides of the tip. It will get VERY shiny and hard.

Chris Cass
10-31-2004, 08:10 PM
That's interesting brother. I'll have to try that tonight. Thanks,

C.C.

stickman
10-31-2004, 09:31 PM
The backside of a leather belt will work fine. I use an old wide leather work belt. Burnishing the shaft, work the shaft lengthwise down the shaft, turning ocassionally. It isn't necessary to rub extremely hard, but fast. The idea is to generate heat from the friction. Done properly, it is easily seen to be highly polished from the process. 800 grit ocassionally used, is okay, but I would rather that you use it rarely. Use lighter fluid, or a commercial shaft cleaner, rather than sand paper to clean the shaft. Also, some like the Mr. Clean micro sponges for cleaning. After cleaning, burnish as above.

For burnishing the tip, I use my lathe to spin the tip. When it is trimmed and shaped, I spin and apply a small amount of ammonia on the side of the tip with a Qtip, then burnish with leather. It does an excellent job for me. If I want it to look super shiney, I finish with a thin coat of shaft sealer. I mask the ferrule, to prevent getting any on it. It can be done without a lathe, but not as easily.

I'm a big advocate of shaft sealer. After cleaning and burnishing my shaft, I like to use a shaft sealer. I burnish with some micro burnishing film, and then burnish again with leather. The sealer helps prevent warpage, and helps protect the shaft from dirt and other contaminants. (chalk, hand oils, sweat, &amp; all kinds of stuff i don't want on my shaft.) /ccboard/images/graemlins/grin.gif I usually clean my shaft with a micro fiber towel. It stays quite clean most of the time, due to the shaft sealer. There are those that don't care for the feel of sealer and prefer a bare shaft, but I like the benefits of the sealer.

Billy_Bob
11-01-2004, 06:11 AM
Where can I buy shaft sealer on the internet and is it called "shaft sealer"?

Do you paint it on? Rub it on with cloth? Other?

stickman
11-01-2004, 08:59 AM
I put it on with a cloth, a very thin film is all that is necessary, and it dries almost instantly. I buy it from www.cuesmith.com (http://www.cuesmith.com) It is simply called shaft sealer. You can get additional information from Chris by using the contact button on his website.

Troy
11-01-2004, 09:38 AM
Or you can go to your local hardware store and buy a small can of "Sand Sealer". Apply a thin film with a cloth as Stick said then gently sand with 800-1000 grit sandpaper.

Troy...~~~ Doesn't spend extra bucks on cue specific products if possible... /ccboard/images/graemlins/smile.gif
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote stickman:</font><hr> I put it on with a cloth, a very thin film is all that is necessary, and it dries almost instantly. I buy it from www.cuesmith.com (http://www.cuesmith.com) It is simply called shaft sealer. You can get additional information from Chris by using the contact button on his website. <hr /></blockquote>

Perk
11-01-2004, 12:01 PM
I cannot say I have used, nor saw this product, but I ran across it while browsing ebay.

http://cgi.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dll?ViewItem&amp;category=21212&amp;item=7109917 579&amp;rd=1

Its pool related! /ccboard/images/graemlins/smile.gif

catscradle
11-01-2004, 12:15 PM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote Perk:</font><hr> I cannot say I have used, nor saw this product, but I ran across it while browsing ebay.

http://cgi.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dll?ViewItem&amp;category=21212&amp;item=7109917 579&amp;rd=1

Its pool related! /ccboard/images/graemlins/smile.gif
<hr /></blockquote>

IMHO, shark oil accomplishes nothing at all. I tried it and found I thought the shaft was stickier after applying it.

Deeman2
11-01-2004, 12:39 PM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote Perk:</font><hr> I cannot say I have used, nor saw this product, but I ran across it while browsing ebay.

http://cgi.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dll?ViewItem&amp;category=21212&amp;item=7109917 579&amp;rd=1

Its pool related! /ccboard/images/graemlins/smile.gif
<hr /></blockquote>

Perk,

Do you know how many sharks it takes to get a gallon of this stuff? I am appalled, no insensed, that a fine democrat from Michigan like you would help in the destruction of our 2,345th most precious natural resource!

Women in Paris will be disrobing over this, I assure you. Their disclaimers of alcohol and other ingriediants should serve as a warning that it may contain other near extinct amimal products as well. Have baby Harp seals been clubed over this? I simply raise the question as a concerned pool citizen.

I have to agree with Tallisman in that we, as pool players, seem to love to pay ten times the cost just because it is labeled "pool" product.

I have found Bald Eagle feathers a good substitue for leather, saving bovines everywhere and am currently involved in adapting stem cells for burnishing sealer. Let's not too quickly forget I was in the forefront advocating the conservation of delrin by using elephant ivory. /ccboard/images/graemlins/smirk.gif

Deeman
tongue ridgidly stuck in cheek....

Perk
11-02-2004, 06:07 AM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote Deeman2:</font><hr> that a fine democrat from <hr /></blockquote> Nope


<blockquote><font class="small">Quote Deeman2:</font><hr>Women in Paris will be disrobing over this <hr /></blockquote> Nice


Thanks for the post, couldnt help but laugh first thing this morning. Still picturing the disrobing, and the eagle feathers....

justbrake
11-02-2004, 08:18 AM
burnishing= is this used with all shafts! even glued shafts like black dot shafts or shafts that are not maple?

Troy
11-02-2004, 08:49 AM
All WOOD shafts, yes. For fiberglass, I wouldn't bother.

Troy
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote justbrake:</font><hr> burnishing= is this used with all shafts! even glued shafts like black dot shafts or shafts that are not maple? <hr /></blockquote>

GStrong
11-03-2004, 09:51 AM
Thanks for all the replies! I have one last question though... Why do you want to burnish the tip? Isn't your tip supposed to be scuffed occasionally so it can hold the chalk? Why smooth it out then?

Take Care, Gary

Troy
11-03-2004, 10:10 AM
Burnishing is done to the edge of the tip, NOT the face that contacts the ball. The result of burnishing is a smooth harder surface that reduces mushrooming.

Troy
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote GStrong:</font><hr> Thanks for all the replies! I have one last question though... Why do you want to burnish the tip? Isn't your tip supposed to be scuffed occasionally so it can hold the chalk? Why smooth it out then?

Take Care, Gary <hr /></blockquote>

PQQLK9
11-03-2004, 10:20 AM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote GStrong:</font><hr> Thanks for all the replies! I have one last question though... Why do you want to burnish the tip? Isn't your tip supposed to be scuffed occasionally so it can hold the chalk? Why smooth it out then?

Take Care, Gary <hr /></blockquote>
/ccboard/images/graemlins/ooo.gif /ccboard/images/graemlins/mad.gif /ccboard/images/graemlins/cool.gif /ccboard/images/graemlins/smile.gif /ccboard/images/graemlins/frown.gif /ccboard/images/graemlins/blush.gif /ccboard/images/graemlins/crazy.gif /ccboard/images/graemlins/laugh.gif /ccboard/images/graemlins/shocked.gif /ccboard/images/graemlins/smirk.gif /ccboard/images/graemlins/confused.gif /ccboard/images/graemlins/grin.gif /ccboard/images/graemlins/wink.gif /ccboard/images/graemlins/tongue.gif
I know you are kidding.