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trailboss
11-01-2004, 02:33 PM
Hi everyone! I am getting better at shot making and I am getting another drill book soon. I know... I am a gluton for punishment! Are there any good position books out there? This is my next hurtle.. I can make the shot but, getting whitey to roll in position for the next shot is getting very hard.

Deeman2
11-01-2004, 02:41 PM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote trailboss:</font><hr> Hi everyone! I am getting better at shot making and I am getting another drill book soon. I know... I am a gluton for punishment! Are there any good position books out there? This is my next hurtle.. I can make the shot but, getting whitey to roll in position for the next shot is getting very hard. <hr /></blockquote>

You didn't mention your game but Phil Cappels "Play your Best Nine Ball" comes to mind as a good place to start. My best recommendation is playing a lot of straight pool to get the basics and pay attention to where the ball goes "on each shot".

Have fun!

Deeman

woody_968
11-01-2004, 03:58 PM
Im with Deeman on this one, the first thing that came to mind was learning to play straight pool. The straight pool bible is an easy read with lots of good information in it.

As he mentioned also pay attention to where the cueball goes on each shot, if the cueball is going to be hitting one or more rails pick a specific spot on the first rail to try and hit.

Learn from your mistakes. Dont fall into the "I just got a bad roll" theory. If you go three rails for shape and scratch dont stand there and think to yourself that was a bad roll, stand there and think how could I have hit the shot differently so that I wouldnt have scratched. Just doing that alone will get you playing better shape in a couple of months.

JimS
11-01-2004, 07:01 PM
Buddy Halls Clock System is a great tape.

Another good tape is Grady Mathews Sixteen Steps.

I'm sure there are lots more.

Try eBay.

SpiderMan
11-02-2004, 09:24 AM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote trailboss:</font><hr> Hi everyone! I am getting better at shot making and I am getting another drill book soon. I know... I am a gluton for punishment! Are there any good position books out there? This is my next hurtle.. I can make the shot but, getting whitey to roll in position for the next shot is getting very hard. <hr /></blockquote>

One of the best training aids I have seen for position play is "Target Pool". Not only does it give you the drills, but also a scoring method so that you can measure your improvement (and compete against your friends).

SpiderMan

Jude_Rosenstock
11-02-2004, 10:37 AM
All of the replies have been excellent but what I think should be pointed out is that the demands of position play will vary according to the game and the situation. Straight Pool can have rather demanding situations yet it should be noted that there are circumstances where a player is playing shape on one of several balls. In other words, there are situations where you will be allowed to choose which shot you can take next based on where the cue-ball stops.

On the other hand, nine-ball can be more specific in terms of which ball to position for yet what is required of that position will vary. Getting on the correct side of a ball in 9-ball is sometimes merely convenient. Experienced nine-ball players are so accustomed to taking the long route that there are times when they may actually play for it. They're playing for what is a workable angle which may not necessarily be as specific as the correct position for a break-shot in straight pool.

In one-pocket or eight-ball, the table is interpreted differently by each player. Circumstances will vary depending on whether your stripes or solids or the left-pocket or right. Position requirements will sometimes be curtailed by defensive back-up plans. Like straight pool, pattern play will become paramount and finding a good pattern could lead to a series of simple position plays that require little cue-ball action.

In sum, you really need to concentrate on the game you're most interested in mastering. However, you should also keep in mind that you should still play all the games with the hopes that each game's unique challenges improve your performance in your favorite game. There are routine circumstances in straight-pool that the nine-ball player will not see for weeks and vice-versa.


Any experienced poolplayer could go on and write a book about the theories behind position play and amazingly, many would differ dramatically in content. Enjoy yourself. This is when the game really gets fun and frustrating but it's what seperates pool from bowling.


Jude M. Rosenstock

Billy_Bob
11-02-2004, 11:33 AM
Speed control is *very* important! Practice shooting the cue ball only; 1 diamond, 2 diamonds, 3, 4, 5, etc. 1 rail, 1 rail + 1 diamond, 1 rail + 2 diamonds, 1 rail + 3, 4, 5, etc. 2 rails, 2 rails + 1 diamond, 2, 3, 4, etc.

Next rack all 15 balls, break. Then shoot each ball so it stops in front of the pocket, but does not drop. This teaches you how slowly you can hit a shot and make the pocket (or how to block a pocket). It also teaches you that a full ball hit can be quite slow, but a cut must be faster.

Next rack all 15 balls, break, then shoot them all in with left English. Again, but all shots with right English, Again all shots with draw. Then again all shots with follow.

Draw shot practice: Place a row of object balls across the table, then cue ball 1 diamond back. Shoot in first ball so cue ball stops. Next shot draw cue ball back 1 diamond. Next shot draw cue ball back 2 diamonds. Then 3, 4, etc. Also try draw shots with object ball 1 diamond away, 2 diamonds, 3, 4, etc. Things change with draw shots when the object ball is further away.

Follow shot practice: Place object ball 1 diamond in front of cue ball. Practice getting cue ball to travel 1 diamond from object ball spot, 2 diamonds, 3, 4, etc.

Once you learn the above basics, then you can start doing things! You may have a cut shot where the cue ball will hit the rail after you hit the object ball and bounce back in a direction for a hit at another ball. All you need to do is make your hit with the correct speed. And you will know how much speed is required to make the shot. So shoot at that speed or add a little more to leave the cue ball where you want it.

Or maybe you have a straight in shot and you need to leave the cue ball near the pocket you are shooting at. Your follow shot practice will teach you to hit the cue ball so it will travel close to the pocket after the shot.

Maybe you need to get the cue ball to go backwards? Your draw shot practice will get you to be able to draw the cue ball back a little or a lot.

At first it is a good idea to not use too much English (left/right)unless necessary. Once you get the speed of the shot, follow, and draw down, then try adding a little English. English is best used for when the cue ball hits a rail. If the ball is spinning a direction when it hits the rail, that spin will make the cue ball go in a different direction from the natural angle. Try hitting just the cue ball into the rail with left, right, or center. Notice the different directions the cue ball goes. So when your cue ball is going to hit a rail after a shot, if there is spin on the cue ball, it can change the direction of where the cue ball goes. So keep that in mind.

Also search google.com for a deck of cards called "Zone Pool" each card has a shot and a place to leave the cue ball. Very good practice for position.

Barbara
11-02-2004, 11:52 AM
Joe Tucker has a little drill book called "Guaranteed Improvement" that has position drills for 1-, 2-, and 3-rail shots. You put a piece of paper on the table to mark where you should end up with the cue ball. Here's a link to where you can order this book:

Joe's book (http://www.roadplayer.com/JTProDrillBook.asp)

Barbara

Wally_in_Cincy
11-02-2004, 12:24 PM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote Barbara:</font><hr> Joe Tucker has a little drill book called "Guaranteed Improvement" that has position drills for 1-, 2-, and 3-rail shots. You put a piece of paper on the table to mark where you should end up with the cue ball. Here's a link to where you can order this book:

Joe's book (http://www.roadplayer.com/JTProDrillBook.asp)

Barbara <hr /></blockquote>

This is the message I got

<font color="black">JT Pro Products can no longer be ordered via the internet. Please contact Joe Tucker at
Snookers &amp; The Green Room, where he is the house pro.

Snookers' web site is http://www.snookersgreenroom.com.

Thanks.
</font color>

daviddjmp
11-03-2004, 01:26 PM
TB-

Phil Cappelle also has a great book called Play Your Best Straight Pool which has extensive sections on both position play and pattern play. I agree with others here that you should tailor your practice toward the game that you want to concentrate on. One practice drill I like is to run balls using no english, middle ball only and try to get position using nothing but cue ball speed. This of course won't get you where you want on a lot of shots, but it is really helpful to know where the cueball goes when you hit it middle ball. This is the basis for all use of english and may be a good starting point for you-