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Rollthecheez
11-04-2004, 02:10 PM
Hi everyone, though I have only posted a few times I have enjoyed reading your posts for a while. There is a lot of great information here!

Anyway, I have a question regarding the durability of the slate on a table. I am in the process of getting my table into condition (replacing the rubber and the cloth) and moving it to my new home. While I was removing the cloth I noticed that near the pockets there were some small crumbs of slate that fell to the floor. I read somewhere that slate was a brittle material so perhaps this is normal from the balls hitting the back of the pockets and bouncing back into the slate? Can I prevent this? The table is 7 years old and I noticed no other signs of wear.

Second part, since slate can be brittle, is it possible to damage it from something like a jumpshot? Could you crack the slate?

I would like to save some cash and do the table setup myself… or should I just fork over the money and have someone else do it?

Thanks for any help!

Jude_Rosenstock
11-04-2004, 03:15 PM
There is little you can do to prevent the normal wear & tear of the slate of your pooltable. I will assure you that if it's a home table you're talking about, it will get significantly less use than any poolroom table and I've seen some that played great after 20 years of use.

In answer to your questions, yes jumpshots can damage slate. Other shots that damage slate are breakshots, masses, stun shots and anything else shot at relatively fast speeds. However, most of the damage that you might be able to measure will not be noticeable during normal play.

Some mechanics will use wax to fill in some areas. They'll especially use it with multi-piece slate tables to smooth out edges and will sometimes use it around the rack area. If there's one practice I would recommend to diminish the wear on your table, I would suggest caring for the rack area. Do not leave the balls racked when the table is not in use and do not hammer the balls in place when having problems freezing the balls. Oh, and most especially, do not use a Sardo Tight Rack.


Jude M. Rosenstock

Troy
11-04-2004, 04:51 PM
Bondo® is used by the two best table mechanics on the West Coast.
Were I you, I'd pay to have the table done. It may look like an easy job, but it's harder than it looks.

Troy
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote Jude_Rosenstock:</font><hr> There is little you can do to prevent the normal wear &amp; tear of the slate of your pooltable. I will assure you that if it's a home table you're talking about, it will get significantly less use than any poolroom table and I've seen some that played great after 20 years of use.

In answer to your questions, yes jumpshots can damage slate. Other shots that damage slate are breakshots, masses, stun shots and anything else shot at relatively fast speeds. However, most of the damage that you might be able to measure will not be noticeable during normal play.

Some mechanics will use wax to fill in some areas. They'll especially use it with multi-piece slate tables to smooth out edges and will sometimes use it around the rack area. If there's one practice I would recommend to diminish the wear on your table, I would suggest caring for the rack area. Do not leave the balls racked when the table is not in use and do not hammer the balls in place when having problems freezing the balls. Oh, and most especially, do not use a Sardo Tight Rack.


Jude M. Rosenstock <hr /></blockquote>

Jude_Rosenstock
11-05-2004, 12:33 AM
Well, if you were me, you would be living in a small apartment in Manhattan and you wouldn't own a pooltable so a table mechanic would be the last person you'd call. /ccboard/images/graemlins/tongue.gif

BUT, if you were the other guy, I'd have to agree with you. One should never service their own table unless they have real training in the craft. Leveling, reclothing and assembling a pool table will determine how well it plays and if it plays like crap, the table will quickly become a great ironing board.

Besides, home tables usually only need to be serviced once a year at most and most mechanics cost no more than $300 to install Simonis clothe, level the table and address any slate concerns.


Jude M. Rosenstock

<blockquote><font class="small">Quote Troy:</font><hr> Bondo® is used by the two best table mechanics on the West Coast.
Were I you, I'd pay to have the table done. It may look like an easy job, but it's harder than it looks.

Troy
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote Jude_Rosenstock:</font><hr> There is little you can do to prevent the normal wear &amp; tear of the slate of your pooltable. I will assure you that if it's a home table you're talking about, it will get significantly less use than any poolroom table and I've seen some that played great after 20 years of use.

In answer to your questions, yes jumpshots can damage slate. Other shots that damage slate are breakshots, masses, stun shots and anything else shot at relatively fast speeds. However, most of the damage that you might be able to measure will not be noticeable during normal play.

Some mechanics will use wax to fill in some areas. They'll especially use it with multi-piece slate tables to smooth out edges and will sometimes use it around the rack area. If there's one practice I would recommend to diminish the wear on your table, I would suggest caring for the rack area. Do not leave the balls racked when the table is not in use and do not hammer the balls in place when having problems freezing the balls. Oh, and most especially, do not use a Sardo Tight Rack.


Jude M. Rosenstock <hr /></blockquote> <hr /></blockquote>

JimS
11-05-2004, 06:04 AM
I recommend that you fork out the bucks and get it done right. It's no small task, requires task specific tools and skills learned from practice/experience. It's more than just "labor". It's a job for an artisan...imo.

Rollthecheez
11-05-2004, 08:38 AM
Thanks for the posts. I guess I needed a couple of more votes for paying a pro to install my table to push me in the right direction.

Maybe a table mechanic could help with one more question?

I plan on setting up the frame and getting the slate in place so that shimming, leveling, filling seams, and stretching the cloth are all that is left to do. I have also already purchased the Simonis and paid to have the rail rubber replaced and the cloth installed on the rails. (I am moving it to a new city so the same people can’t do the install)

My question - Is it reasonable for me to be charged for the full table move/installation plus the labor to recover the table bed? (Even though the table will be 90% assembled?) If so I would be looking at almost $500 according to the one company near me that does installations! Their logic is that the fine tuning is the hardest part - even though in the past when I have had the table recovered, the seams were refilled, the shims adjusted, and the table was leveled all for the price of the cloth. (Too bad I am moving the table to a city 300 miles away from my favorite billiards store!)

JimS
11-05-2004, 09:30 AM
Any reasonable person would think that a substantial discount would be involved if you have it all set up and ready to be "tuned".

Maybe you call someone in the city to which you are moving? Search the yellow pages on the internet?

Troy
11-05-2004, 09:38 AM
If I'm reading you correctly, YOU will do the main-frame assembly and put the slates in place, the new rail rubber will be installed AND covered.

At your new location, a mechanic will level the frame, level &amp; fine tune the slates and seams, finish the cloth on the bed, and attach/finish the rail frame.

IMO, $500 is STEEP since you're supplying the cloth. I don't agree that 90% of the work will be done, but certainly some will be, maybe 50%. As you were correctly told, "fine tuning is the hardest part". In NorCal that would be about a $250 home table job. (And stuff ain't cheap here... /ccboard/images/graemlins/frown.gif )

I suggest you visit a couple pool rooms in your new location and hopefully get the name of their table mechanic.

I also suggest you have the same person covering the bed also cover the rails. Consistency is the reason.

Troy
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote Rollthecheez:</font><hr>Maybe a table mechanic could help with one more question?

I plan on setting up the frame and getting the slate in place so that shimming, leveling, filling seams, and stretching the cloth are all that is left to do. I have also already purchased the Simonis and paid to have the rail rubber replaced and the cloth installed on the rails. (I am moving it to a new city so the same people can?t do the install)

My question - Is it reasonable for me to be charged for the full table move/installation plus the labor to recover the table bed? (Even though the table will be 90% assembled?) If so I would be looking at almost $500 according to the one company near me that does installations! Their logic is that the fine tuning is the hardest part - even though in the past when I have had the table recovered, the seams were refilled, the shims adjusted, and the table was leveled all for the price of the cloth. (Too bad I am moving the table to a city 300 miles away from my favorite billiards store!)
<hr /></blockquote>

NBC-BOB
11-05-2004, 09:48 AM
I don't know what to tell you,about your problem, but your term,brittle slate,reminded me of what I saw in an old rule book, and how to check the slate bed.Drop a ball from 3 ft above the table, and if it leaves any indentation, the bed is unacceptable.Now I would never do this to my table, and any good room owner, would throw you out.But this is in my old rule book, from around 40 yrs ago.I just thought it was funny! Bob