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SnakebyteXX
11-14-2004, 01:57 PM
Is he concerned about violation of his privacy or is he trying to keep potentially incriminating evidence out of court?

Posted on Thu, Oct. 21, 2004

Rush Limbaugh Appeals Ruling on Records

JILL BARTON

Associated Press


WEST PALM BEACH, Fla. - Rush Limbaugh on Thursday appealed a court ruling that would allow prosecutors investigating his use of painkillers to examine his medical records.

The conservative commentator has said that the seizure of the records violated his privacy, and that he committed no crime.

Limbaugh attorney Roy Black asked for a rehearing by Florida's 4th District Court of Appeal.

Investigators raided Limbaugh's doctors' offices in November to see if Limbaugh had engaged in "doctor shopping," or illegally visiting several doctors to receive duplicate prescriptions.

Limbaugh has not been charged. Prosecutors have not been allowed to review the medical records while the case is heard.

Two weeks ago, the appeals court rejected Limbaugh's claim that his privacy rights trumped investigators' authority to seize his records.

Prosecutors went after the records after learning that Limbaugh received about 2,000 painkillers, prescribed by four doctors in six months, at a pharmacy near his Palm Beach mansion. Limbaugh contends the investigation is politically motivated.

Limbaugh admitted an addiction to pain medication last October, saying it stemmed from severe back pain. He took a five-week leave from his afternoon radio show to enter a rehab program.

silverbullet
11-14-2004, 11:20 PM
Since he already admitted the addiction, dont know why they are using 'gestapo' techniques unless they are trying to get he doctors or something.

Havent listened to him for a long time, is he any less obnoxious since admitting to be an addict? If not, he deserves a lifetime sentence of mandatory 2x week in Narcotics Anonymous. LOL

sb

Wally_in_Cincy
11-15-2004, 06:30 AM
If he was just a regular schmoe I doubt that he would get more than probation. This tactic they are using is probably unprecedented in the prosecution of a prescription drug abuser.

crawdaddio
11-15-2004, 10:26 AM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote Wally_in_Cincy:</font><hr> If he was just a regular schmoe I doubt that he would get more than probation. This tactic they are using is probably unprecedented in the prosecution of a prescription drug abuser. <hr /></blockquote>

But if he were a regular black schmoe in the ghetto he would be in jail.

~DC

SnakebyteXX
11-15-2004, 10:45 AM
Limbaugh won't be prosecuted, attorneys wager

By JOHN PACENTI
Palm Beach Post Staff Writer
Rush Limbaugh's alleged addiction to painkillers may be documented in e-mails.

His reported drug deals may have been taped by his former housekeeper.

And the talkative maid and her handyman husband could even be willing to testify against the conservative talk-show host. They sure were willing to spill everything to a supermarket tabloid.

But the chance of criminal charges ever being filed against Limbaugh is next to nil, say criminal defense attorneys who have handled numerous drug cases.

And some local lawyers say they are hearing from sources within State Attorney Barry Krischer's office that Limbaugh - who lives in a $24 million mansion on Palm Beach - will indeed not be charged.

Sources also said Limbaugh won't even be questioned by law enforcement officials, unless the commentator chooses to cooperate on his own.

Roy Black is the Miami powerhouse attorney Limbaugh has reportedly hired to represent him. But Black, who has represented such celebrities as Marv Albert and William Kennedy Smith, won't return calls to confirm he has been retained. And Limbaugh said on his radio show Friday he wasn't at liberty to address the allegations.

James Martz, the prosecutor who heads up a task force on money-laundering, said he is more interested in finding the heads of such distribution cells as opposed to prosecuting low-level drug users - whether they are celebrities or not.

Plus, to prosecute drug abusers, authorities need to catch them in possession of the illegal substance, he said. "Shy of that, we have very little leverage in the state system," Martz said.

What it all comes down to, attorneys say, is that the court of public opinion is a far cry from the court of law.

"I think that the state better have a heck of a lot more than what I'm seeing, hearing and reading right now," attorney Michael Salnick said. "First of all you have a major credibility issue with these witnesses. The credibility issue starts with the fact they sold their story to The National Enquirer."

The former maid, Wilma Cline, and her husband, David Cline, told The Enquirer for its latest edition that Limbaugh bulldogged them into supplying him with thousands of painkillers between 1998 and 2002. They said Limbaugh took hydrocodone, Lorcet and OxyContin.

The story came out on the heels of Limbaugh resigning from his job as an ESPN sports analyst after he said Philadelphia Eagles quarterback Donovan McNabb was overrated because the media wanted a black quarterback to succeed.


Maid said she taped transactions

It is unknown if the timing was coincidental, but The Enquirer's story is full of juicy details. According to the piece, it all started when Limbaugh asked for some extra pain pills from David Cline's legitimate prescription for a back injury. Soon, Limbaugh demanded that they continue to supply him with pills when the prescription ran out. That's when Wilma Cline started keeping a log of her deliveries and preserved desperate e-mails from Limbaugh in which he referred to pills as "small blue babies."

Wilma Cline said she would meet Limbaugh in parking lots, passing a cigar box filled with pills through his Mercedes' window

During her two last drug deliveries, Wilma Cline told The Enquirer, she secretly audiotaped the transactions.

Late last year, the Clines went to prosectors, who gave them immunity. Sources say the couple helped prosecutors in their investigation into tracking some 450,000 pills of hydrocodone back to the source.

Authorities believe some of Limbaugh's supply was dispensed from a small suburban Lake Worth pharmacy, World Health Association. The couple that ran the operation, Gloria and Louis Beshara, were arrested in May, seven months after the Clines came forward. The Besharas currently face trafficking charges.

Also, what could undermine the Clines' credibility is that David Cline has a criminal history.

He was arrested in 1982 in Collier County for cocaine trafficking, serving five years in prison. In 2000, he was arrested on charges of identity theft - using the name George Earl Taylor - of possessing a fake driver license and fake vehicle registration, as well as possession of marijuana and resisting arrest. He served 18 months probation.

It is unknown if the couple received full immunity from prosecutors for information they gave about how they provided pills for Limbaugh. If Wilma Cline did tape Limbaugh without his knowledge, that is a third-degree felony punishable by up to five years in prison, attorneys say. Plus, Martz said such tapings can't even be heard by prosecutors. As for e-mail evidence, Martz said any such evidence is problematic because there is trouble verifying who sent the e-mail.

So where does this leave Limbaugh's criminal liability?

"I think it's legal suicide to go after a guy like Limbaugh with evidence as flimsy as this," Salnick said.

Two former prosecutors, now in private practice, agree.

Robert Gershman said most of the time, users are prosecuted only for possession. He said the Clines probably wouldn't have even gotten in the door of the state attorney's office if they weren't outing a celebrity.

Marc Shiner said the celebrity issue taints the case. "Why would drug dealers turn in their client unless they are trying to save their own neck - or trying to make a couple hundred thousand dollars peddling their story to the tabloids?" he asked.

"If I was Roy Black, I'd be sitting on the beach right now sipping a pina colada or watching a Marlins game and not worrying too much about Rush Limbaugh's criminal liability right now."

Link (http://www.palmbeachpost.com/localnews/content/news/limbaugh/100403_limbaugh4.html)

crawdaddio
11-15-2004, 11:34 AM
My point exactly. He can buy his way out conviction or jail time or both due to his wealth and status. I have seen a few friends jailed for posession of weed, a far less harmful drug, so don't try to tell me it doesn't happen.

Peace
~DC

Deeman2
11-15-2004, 11:47 AM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote crawdaddio:</font><hr> <blockquote><font class="small">Quote Wally_in_Cincy:</font><hr> If he was just a regular schmoe I doubt that he would get more than probation. This tactic they are using is probably unprecedented in the prosecution of a prescription drug abuser. <hr /></blockquote>

But if he were a regular black schmoe in the ghetto he would be in jail.

~DC <hr /></blockquote>

<font color="blue"> You have somewhat valid point here as minorities were and are not treated fairly in the judicial if they are not O.J. However, most of your friends did not get jail time on a first offense for minor drug (weed) possession/usage. Is it somehow more fair to treat a loud mouthed white guy any different?</font color>

Deeman

highsea
11-15-2004, 11:56 AM
Well, it doesn't sound like they caught him in posession from the article. I haven't followed this story because I just don't care. But celebrity status and wealth won't get you off the hook automatically, just look at Martha Stewart or some of the Hollywood characters who have run afoul of various laws. They usually get prosecuted if there's a case. But they do get the good lawyers, no arguing that..

It sounds like his housekeeper was setting him up, I don't know. Prosecutors always wildly exaggerate these things, and he did go into treatment voluntarily, so if he sees any jail time, it will be brief anyway.

crawdaddio
11-15-2004, 12:08 PM
[ QUOTE ]
Is it somehow more fair to treat a loud mouthed white guy any different? <hr /></blockquote>

Of course not. All should be treated equally in the eyes of the law, but they are not, and that is a fact. I was merely pointing out the flawed legal system, of which I'm pretty sure we're all aware (well except maybe Wally).

My buddy was arrested with one quarter ounce and it was his first offense. Because he had it in two bags (I don't know why, but he definitely did not sell it) he was convicted and served six months. He was nineteen. He was one of the nicest guys I had ever known. Jail turned him into a hateful criminal, and I haven't seen him since he got out of jail and decided to go on a robbery spree despite my (and others') efforts to help him straighten out.

Really, really sad........

Peace
~DC

Wally_in_Cincy
11-15-2004, 12:12 PM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote crawdaddio:</font><hr> Of course not. All should be treated equally in the eyes of the law, but they are not, and that is a fact. I was merely pointing out the flawed legal system, of which I'm pretty sure we're all aware (well except maybe Wally).

My buddy was arrested with one quarter ounce and it was his first offense. Because he had it in two bags (I don't know why, but he definitely did not sell it) he was convicted and served six months. He was nineteen. He was one of the nicest guys I had ever known. Jail turned him into a hateful criminal, and I haven't seen him since he got out of jail and decided to go on a robbery spree despite my (and others') efforts to help him straighten out.

Really, really sad........

Peace
~DC <hr /></blockquote>

Just for the record, I think marijuana should be legal for adults to use.

SnakebyteXX
11-15-2004, 12:15 PM
Ironic?

----------------------------

Limbaugh on Drugs

People like Limbaugh should go to jail, says Limbaugh

There's nothing good about drug use. We know it. It destroys individuals. It destroys families. Drug use destroys societies. Drug use, some might say, is destroying this country. And we have laws against selling drugs, pushing drugs, using drugs, importing drugs. And the laws are good because we know what happens to people in societies and neighborhoods, which become consumed by them. And so if people are violating the law by doing drugs, they ought to be accused and they ought to be convicted and they ought to be sent up.

What this says to me is that too many whites are getting away with drug use. Too many whites are getting away with drug sales. Too many whites are getting away with trafficking in this stuff. The answer to this disparity is not to start letting people out of jail because we're not putting others in jail who are breaking the law. The answer is to go out and find the ones who are getting away with it, convict them and send them up the river, too.

...We are becoming too tolerant as a society, folks, especially of crime, in too many parts of the country.... This country certainly appears to be tolerant, forgive and forget. I mean, you know as well as I do, you go out and commit the worst murder in the world and you just say you're sorry, people go, "Oh, OK. A little contrition."... People say, "I feel better. He said he's sorry for it." We're becoming too tolerant, folks.

--Rush Limbaugh TV show (10/5/95)

These tough sentencing laws were instituted for a reason. The American people, including liberals, demanded them. Don't you remember the crack cocaine epidemic? Crack babies and out-of-control murder rates? Liberal judges giving the bad guys slaps on the wrist? Finally we got tough, and the crime rate has been falling ever since, so what's wrong?

--RushLimbaugh.com (8/18/03)

In the audio link below, I go into detail about these non-thinking talking points that "you can't tell people what to do with their bodies" and "you can't legislate morality." First of all, we tell people what they can do to their bodies all the time--no cocaine, no prostitution, no throwing yourself off a building. Second, laws are nothing but defining morality!

--RushLimbaugh.com (6/27/03)

All right. Joe Fernandez came to New York from Miami, ladies and gentlemen, to be schools chancellor.... Now he is embattled--he's got a book that just came out, an autobiography that's soon to come out, I think, in which he admits that he was a mainliner as a teen-ager. This guy [pretends to stick needle in arm]--pfsst--shot up heroin. And people are praising him. He overcame the scourge. He triumphed over that profound obstacle in his life and has gone on to become this great schools chancellor.... [Plays a clip of Fernandez saying that the message of his teenage drug use is "to not give up on our kids."]

Reach out and try to help them, not give up on the kids, give them condoms and teach them about a bunch of stuff that is worthless in terms of preparing them for their future as adults in the greatest country on Earth, teaching them all this social gobbledygook. "Let's not forget about the kids."...


Whoa. The guy wants to be education secretary, folks. Watch out. Now why does he want to go to Washington? Probably because he's studied the case of Marion Barry. Here's a guy who got involved in drugs. You want to see my Marion Barry impersonation? Do you want to see that? All right. I'll do the Marion Barry impersonation.


You put some stuff out here on the table and you go [pretends to snort cocaine]. "You tell Jesse to stay out of my town. This is my town, and Jesse--you tell him to stay out. [More snorting.] And I said no, no, no, no, I don't smoke it no more. Tired of ending up on the floor." [More snorting.]


So what is he? He gets involved in drugs and ends up, ladies and gentlemen, as a newly elected official in Washington, D.C.... So I'm sure Joe Fernandez is looking down there saying, "Hey, there's a future for, you know, drug users in Washington, D.C."

--Rush Limbaugh TV show (12/8/92)

When you strip it all away, Jerry Garcia destroyed his life on drugs. And yet he's being honored, like some godlike figure. Our priorities are out of whack, folks.

--Rush Limbaugh radio show (quoted in the L.A. Times, 8/20/95)

I want to let you read along with me a quote from Jerry Colangelo about substance abuse, and I think you'll find that he's very much right…"I know every expert in the world will disagree with me, but I don't buy into the disease part of it. The first time you reach for a substance you are making a choice. Every time you go back, you are making a personal choice. I feel very strongly about that."...

What he's saying is that if there's a line of cocaine here, I have to make the choice to go down and sniff it….And his point is that we are rationalizing all this irresponsibility and all the choices people are making and we're blaming not them, but society for it. All these Hollywood celebrities say the reason they're weird and bizarre is because they were abused by their parents. So we're going to pay for that kind of rehab, too, and we shouldn't. It's not our responsibility. It's up to the people who are doing it. And Colangelo is right.

--Rush Limbaugh TV show (9/23/93)

I have a solution for Mrs. [Jocelyn] Elders. I mean, if she wants to legalize drugs, send the people who want to do drugs to London and Zurich and let's be rid of them. Now...The problem with legalizing drugs is, it's just another abhorrent example of human behavior that we've suddenly decided, "Hey, we can't handle it. We've given up and we're going to sanction the destruction of lives. We're going to let you destroy your life. We're going to make it easy, and then all of us who accept the responsibilities of life and don't destroy our lives on drugs--we'll pay for whatever messes you get into."...

I'm appalled at people who simply want to look at all this abhorrent behavior and say, "Hey, you know, we can't control it anymore. People are going to do drugs anyway. Let's legalize it." It's a dumb idea. It's a rotten idea, and those who are for it are purely, 100 percent selfish.

--Rush Limbaugh TV show (12/9/93)


url=http://www.fair.org/extra/0311/limbaugh-drugs.html]Link (http://url=http://www.fair.org/extra/0311/limbaugh-drugs.html]Link)

SnakebyteXX
11-15-2004, 12:16 PM
Ironic?

----------------------------

Limbaugh on Drugs

People like Limbaugh should go to jail, says Limbaugh

There's nothing good about drug use. We know it. It destroys individuals. It destroys families. Drug use destroys societies. Drug use, some might say, is destroying this country. And we have laws against selling drugs, pushing drugs, using drugs, importing drugs. And the laws are good because we know what happens to people in societies and neighborhoods, which become consumed by them. And so if people are violating the law by doing drugs, they ought to be accused and they ought to be convicted and they ought to be sent up.

What this says to me is that too many whites are getting away with drug use. Too many whites are getting away with drug sales. Too many whites are getting away with trafficking in this stuff. The answer to this disparity is not to start letting people out of jail because we're not putting others in jail who are breaking the law. The answer is to go out and find the ones who are getting away with it, convict them and send them up the river, too.

...We are becoming too tolerant as a society, folks, especially of crime, in too many parts of the country.... This country certainly appears to be tolerant, forgive and forget. I mean, you know as well as I do, you go out and commit the worst murder in the world and you just say you're sorry, people go, "Oh, OK. A little contrition."... People say, "I feel better. He said he's sorry for it." We're becoming too tolerant, folks.

--Rush Limbaugh TV show (10/5/95)

These tough sentencing laws were instituted for a reason. The American people, including liberals, demanded them. Don't you remember the crack cocaine epidemic? Crack babies and out-of-control murder rates? Liberal judges giving the bad guys slaps on the wrist? Finally we got tough, and the crime rate has been falling ever since, so what's wrong?

--RushLimbaugh.com (8/18/03)

In the audio link below, I go into detail about these non-thinking talking points that "you can't tell people what to do with their bodies" and "you can't legislate morality." First of all, we tell people what they can do to their bodies all the time--no cocaine, no prostitution, no throwing yourself off a building. Second, laws are nothing but defining morality!

--RushLimbaugh.com (6/27/03)

All right. Joe Fernandez came to New York from Miami, ladies and gentlemen, to be schools chancellor.... Now he is embattled--he's got a book that just came out, an autobiography that's soon to come out, I think, in which he admits that he was a mainliner as a teen-ager. This guy [pretends to stick needle in arm]--pfsst--shot up heroin. And people are praising him. He overcame the scourge. He triumphed over that profound obstacle in his life and has gone on to become this great schools chancellor.... [Plays a clip of Fernandez saying that the message of his teenage drug use is "to not give up on our kids."]

Reach out and try to help them, not give up on the kids, give them condoms and teach them about a bunch of stuff that is worthless in terms of preparing them for their future as adults in the greatest country on Earth, teaching them all this social gobbledygook. "Let's not forget about the kids."...


Whoa. The guy wants to be education secretary, folks. Watch out. Now why does he want to go to Washington? Probably because he's studied the case of Marion Barry. Here's a guy who got involved in drugs. You want to see my Marion Barry impersonation? Do you want to see that? All right. I'll do the Marion Barry impersonation.


You put some stuff out here on the table and you go [pretends to snort cocaine]. "You tell Jesse to stay out of my town. This is my town, and Jesse--you tell him to stay out. [More snorting.] And I said no, no, no, no, I don't smoke it no more. Tired of ending up on the floor." [More snorting.]


So what is he? He gets involved in drugs and ends up, ladies and gentlemen, as a newly elected official in Washington, D.C.... So I'm sure Joe Fernandez is looking down there saying, "Hey, there's a future for, you know, drug users in Washington, D.C."

--Rush Limbaugh TV show (12/8/92)

When you strip it all away, Jerry Garcia destroyed his life on drugs. And yet he's being honored, like some godlike figure. Our priorities are out of whack, folks.

--Rush Limbaugh radio show (quoted in the L.A. Times, 8/20/95)

I want to let you read along with me a quote from Jerry Colangelo about substance abuse, and I think you'll find that he's very much right…"I know every expert in the world will disagree with me, but I don't buy into the disease part of it. The first time you reach for a substance you are making a choice. Every time you go back, you are making a personal choice. I feel very strongly about that."...

What he's saying is that if there's a line of cocaine here, I have to make the choice to go down and sniff it….And his point is that we are rationalizing all this irresponsibility and all the choices people are making and we're blaming not them, but society for it. All these Hollywood celebrities say the reason they're weird and bizarre is because they were abused by their parents. So we're going to pay for that kind of rehab, too, and we shouldn't. It's not our responsibility. It's up to the people who are doing it. And Colangelo is right.

--Rush Limbaugh TV show (9/23/93)

I have a solution for Mrs. [Jocelyn] Elders. I mean, if she wants to legalize drugs, send the people who want to do drugs to London and Zurich and let's be rid of them. Now...The problem with legalizing drugs is, it's just another abhorrent example of human behavior that we've suddenly decided, "Hey, we can't handle it. We've given up and we're going to sanction the destruction of lives. We're going to let you destroy your life. We're going to make it easy, and then all of us who accept the responsibilities of life and don't destroy our lives on drugs--we'll pay for whatever messes you get into."...

I'm appalled at people who simply want to look at all this abhorrent behavior and say, "Hey, you know, we can't control it anymore. People are going to do drugs anyway. Let's legalize it." It's a dumb idea. It's a rotten idea, and those who are for it are purely, 100 percent selfish.

--Rush Limbaugh TV show (12/9/93)


Link (http://www.fair.org/extra/0311/limbaugh-drugs.html)

Deeman2
11-15-2004, 12:25 PM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote Wally_in_Cincy:</font><hr> <hr /></blockquote>

Just for the record, I think marijuana should be legal for adults to use. <hr /></blockquote>

Wally,

Only if they allow us to use tasers on infants directly out of the womb! Well, maybe if they let me have free samples! Oh. Heck let's do it. We got the White House, Senate and Arnold, maybe it's got a shot.
/ccboard/images/graemlins/tongue.gif
Deeman

crawdaddio
11-15-2004, 12:32 PM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote Wally_in_Cincy:</font><hr>

Just for the record, I think marijuana should be legal for adults to use. <hr /></blockquote>

HOLY CR#*, we agree on something /ccboard/images/graemlins/wink.gif /ccboard/images/graemlins/laugh.gif

~DC