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DeadStrokeMan
11-18-2004, 11:57 PM
First Home Table in about 30 years /ccboard/images/graemlins/smile.gif

I finally finished setting up my 1942 bruny by myself.

I played for about a couple of hours tonight - Here are the things that I've learned about "setting up a table".

Standard levels are *NOT* good enough. The "slightest" deviation in the bubble on these levels is hard to detect. The levels available are not suited for deviations < ~ 1/32 - and that SHOWS in minor drift. I have a tad of drift at two corners as a result (very minor tho).

When I leveled the slates across - I really found it best to use a VERY straight edge about 2 feet long and attempt to "rock" (see-saw) at the slate joints. If it rocks at all - the slates are not aligned. If you can see light underneath , the joint must be raised. Me thinx the best is to get all those slates to line up with each other and level off the table itself afterward (leveling the base first of course) If any slate deviates from the other (tilt) - you are in trouble ..flat out. I spent alot of time going through this process. I have learned ALOT about the table and even my own game by doing this. I knew it would pay off.

First off - the cloth I use was the old cloth that I had drycleaned. This way - if I screwed up bad ...no big deal. I managed to get play table better than I've played in most halls by far.

Now me rails are 'eh ... not the best - but livable for the time being.

Its a blast - I haven't had a table at home since I was about 16 years old or so. Why did I wait so long?

One very happy camper. P.S. -Managed to get those rails in enough to really make the pockets tight. They open at 4-1/2" - tight action. I missed a bunch of shots right off - LOL. Good - I want TIGHT play!

Now - I'm going back to my table ... bye bye
/ccboard/images/graemlins/laugh.gif

Popcorn
11-19-2004, 12:32 AM
Quote
"P.S. -Managed to get those rails in enough to really make the pockets tight. They open at 4-1/2" - tight action. I missed a bunch of shots right off - LOL. Good - I want TIGHT play!"


What do you mean by "Managed to get those rails in enough"

DavidMorris
11-19-2004, 06:28 AM
A machinists level is the preferred level to use, but I've seen people use various "homemade" devices to determine level. For instance, a pane of glass about 6-12" square. Set a clean billiard ball down in the center of the glass and see if it moves. Move the glass around the table to check all areas.

As to the slate joints, my installer used a straight edge razor blade. He held it standing up with the sharp edge against the slate, crossing the slate joint, and sliding it back and forth like he was sawing through the slate. If the slates are even a little uneven, the edge of the razor blade will hang. That's assuming you can stand the "nails on a chalkboard" sound it makes, of course. /ccboard/images/graemlins/wink.gif

But congratulations on your table! Yep, having one at home is a joy, for sure! /ccboard/images/graemlins/smile.gif

Ives
11-19-2004, 06:37 AM
Hey Deadstroke
congrats on the table, I just finished recoveing mine over the weekend. Other than one litle glitch in one end rail, it came out really good. I have enough cloth left to recover 2 rails if needed, but i think i'll be ok.

So did you use wax in your slate seems or joint compound. I used wax and just melted it in with a blow torch, than scraped off the excess, made the joints real smooth. I also borrowed a machinist level from work, man those things are sensitive, but i think i got it pretty level, no ball drifts from slow rolling yet. Anyways congrats again, now the addiction really kicks in.

wolfdancer
11-19-2004, 09:43 AM
Mechanics I know use a Starrett level. And "tweaking" the slates to line them up takes some skill....sounds like you did a good job...Congrats!!!

wolfdancer
11-19-2004, 09:52 AM
the one guy that I know that uses wax, has an old small coffee maker(percolater) that he heats on a hot plate..he'll also use a propane torch. The problem with wax is that sometimes tiny balls come off and you can feel them under the cloth. Hitting them with a block of wood and a hammer works sometimes, but I've also had to open the cloth to remove them. for my money on a home table, that won't be moved...Bondo...or at least Durham's Water Putty

DeadStrokeMan
11-19-2004, 08:34 PM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote Ives:</font><hr> Hey Deadstroke
congrats on the table, I just finished recoveing mine over the weekend. Other than one litle glitch in one end rail, it came out really good. I have enough cloth left to recover 2 rails if needed, but i think i'll be ok.

So did you use wax in your slate seems or joint compound. I used wax and just melted it in with a blow torch, than scraped off the excess, made the joints real smooth. I also borrowed a machinist level from work, man those things are sensitive, but i think i got it pretty level, no ball drifts from slow rolling yet. Anyways congrats again, now the addiction really kicks in. <hr /></blockquote>

The slates are in rough shape - buggered at the joint alot. So I used BONDO and did a very clean job (Used to do auto-body work when I was younger /ccboard/images/graemlins/smile.gif ).

A couple of slate defections I thought would be buried in the cloth are "active" - that is, you hear the 'click' when the ball crosses them. Oh well - when I get the simonis and rails I'll address these issues.

I have a lasor line leveler that I might try to use if I can find a way to employ it. That water trick sounded pretty kool /ccboard/images/graemlins/smile.gif

As to putting a razor to the joint for comparing the heights - not with these slates, I'd have to buy new slates ... but with the bondo all is well. No raises ...very clean play. For some reason I can get WICKED Masse off this cloth ... can't stop Masse-ing LOL /ccboard/images/graemlins/grin.gif

66goat
11-20-2004, 05:07 AM
I'm ordering my new cloth today and hope to get it on during the holiday weekend. I use beeswax between the slates in in the screw holes. What I like to do is get it in the cracks and level it with a razer scraper. After that, I go back over the already smoothed wax with a blow torch again, holding it about 6" away the wax smoothes over like a baby's but. It's worked well on all the tables I've done so far, so I guess I'll stick with it again this time.

I haven't heard of the bondo trick. Interesting /ccboard/images/graemlins/wink.gif

What color cloth did everyone use? I currently have a dark green cloth and am thinking about ordering a Navy blue for my slate and then leaving the rails green. Have many of you seen a two color table before? Will it be distracting, or look ok? I recently seen a Zebra striped table at a local reseller. WOW, that was pretty.. /ccboard/images/graemlins/tongue.gif

As far as the level goes, I will be using my 8 ft, 4ft and 2ft carpenters level. They've seemed to work just fine in the past for me. What does everyone use for leveling under the legs if they do not have adjustable feet? I've used several things over the years, but have never been real happy with any of them. Let me know. I may go to Home Depot and buy feet for this table while I have it stripped down. That would make it so much easier to adjust over time as the kids and drunks bump into it. /ccboard/images/graemlins/grin.gif

Adios all,