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scotty1111
11-25-2004, 12:30 AM
I recently built a room for a pool table the final size is 13"8" by 17'6" will this give me enough room for a standard 7ft table

DeadStrokeMan
11-25-2004, 12:34 AM
You need a clean - 17'4" x 14'2"

You can use a "stubby"

Popcorn
11-25-2004, 01:39 AM
You should be OK. You need 16.4 x 13.2 you should have just enough room but not much extra.

stroker6626
11-25-2004, 07:55 AM
What about a 9'by 4'.5? How much room do I need?

Ives
11-25-2004, 07:59 AM
http://www.bestbilliard.com/resources/dimensions.htm

this will give you a rough idea of room sizes. hope it helps.

SnakebyteXX
11-25-2004, 08:03 AM
[ QUOTE ]
What about a 9'by 4'.5? How much room do I need? <hr /></blockquote>

Here you go:

HOW MUCH SPACE DO I NEED??? (http://www.pearl-wick.com/size.htm)

Room Size Considerations (http://www.netpath.net/heads/14.html#features)

From Pool &amp; Billiards Frequently Asked Questions (http://www.faqs.org/faqs/sports/billiards/faq/)

** How much room do I need for a table?

The minimum space for a table is the playing area plus the length of a
cue (58") plus about 6 inches for the back swing, more for comfort, on
each side. "Seven foot" tables vary in size. Work down from the 8' dimensions.

If your room does not meet these minimum size requirements, many
billiard retailers will suggest that you can still put a table in, and
use short cues (52", or 48"). Many people have found they are unhappy
having to resort to shorter cues, and should have either gotten a
smaller table, or no table at all. Others, of course, take the
opposite view -- they are delighted to have any table.

In the end, only you will know whether you are happy with the room
dimensions and need for short cues. Before you spend $2000 for a table
that will cause you to smash the walls in frustration, try this:
(1) Find an indulgent pool hall when it's not busy. (2) Measure your
space (at home) carefully, including the distance from the table to all
walls that require a special cue (3) Go to the pool hall with a piece
or pieces of plywood or some such, and a short cue, and set up the
"walls" to replicate where the walls would be in your house. Play for
several hours, using the short cue when needed.

Between two tables you can do with about the length of a cue, the limit
is caused not by the cue, but by the player being able to go into his
stance between the tables. Deluxe rooms really need more room on all
sides to let possible passers-by move without bumping into the players.

stroker6626
11-25-2004, 08:18 AM
Thanks a lot Ives, greatly appreciated! I just got done finishing up my room and now in the process of looking for a table, I used to have a Brunswick Gold Crown 111 with the ball return, did not like the ball return because of the accumulation of dust on the rails under the table, that kept the balls dirty, had to clean them frequently.
I am looking for a used Diamond table with the single slate, not sure if I will have to buy new, wanted to avoid paying $5,000 for a table, any suggestions?

stroker6626
11-25-2004, 08:27 AM
Thanks a bunch Snakebytexx greatly appreciated! now I know how to place my future table, thanks again!

Ives
11-25-2004, 08:39 AM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote stroker6626:</font><hr>
I am looking for a used Diamond table with the single slate, not sure if I will have to buy new, wanted to avoid paying $5,000 for a table, any suggestions? <hr /></blockquote>

Hey stroker
why you looking for a single slate? there much harder to move around. Going to weigh around 600lbs just for the slate alone.

stroker6626
11-26-2004, 08:16 AM
I have no seams to come apart, i realize it will be hard to mover around, but how often do we have to move it around? hardly ever, and at my age, probably never...........LOL

ras314
11-26-2004, 09:12 AM
Diamond sells the tables used in their sponsored tournaments. They are 1 piece slates with the slate probably weighing around 800-900 lb. I think they transport the tables assembeled except with the legs off, apparently they can be moved around with less slate movement on the frame than a 3 piece slate.

Try www.diamondbilliards.com (http://www.diamondbilliards.com) may have to give them a call for prices on the tournament tables.

Popcorn
11-26-2004, 09:42 AM
Are you sure they make a one piece slate?

ras314
11-26-2004, 09:56 AM
I was told they were one piece when I called about buying one. I watched them being set up at the open but since the cloth and rails were on I couldn't see the slate. Too dumb to look under the tables, possibly they could have been glued together.

rogerb
11-27-2004, 04:27 AM
From the Diamond Pro installation guide "Step 5: **(Drawing 6) Put the slates on the frame and match up the pins and dowels" (Slates = 3 piece )

JimS
11-27-2004, 07:13 AM
Diamond makes a table which uses a 1 pc slate. These are, I believe, used for commerical purposes such as in tournaments.

"Normal" Diamond tables, those bought and intended for home use, are 3 pc slate tables.

I'm convinced that they are the best tables on the planet. /ccboard/images/graemlins/wink.gif

Fred Agnir
11-27-2004, 07:38 AM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote Popcorn:</font><hr> Are you sure they make a one piece slate? <hr /></blockquote>Their Smart Tables are one piece. I believe that even their 9' Smart Tables used at the DCC are one piece slate.

Fred

Fred Agnir
11-27-2004, 07:39 AM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote scotty1111:</font><hr> I recently built a room for a pool table the final size is 13"8" by 17'6" will this give me enough room for a standard 7ft table <hr /></blockquote>It's do-able for a standard home 7' table, but it will be tight.

It's too small, IMO, for a 7' bar table. You'd be jacked up a lot. But better than nothing, I say.

Fred

Popcorn
11-27-2004, 07:44 AM
On their web site under the professional model it says:

"- 1 1/4" Matched Italian Slate"


I would understand that to mean more then one slate on the table. They are extra thick though.

Fred Agnir
11-27-2004, 07:45 AM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote Ives:</font><hr> http://www.bestbilliard.com/resources/dimensions.htm

this will give you a rough idea of room sizes. hope it helps.
<hr /></blockquote>It is my sincere hope that nobody ever points to this "room dimension site" again. In a sentence, it sucks. People will be very disappointed if they have a room (according to this bogus chart) that "fits" a 57" cue.

Fred &lt;~~~ add a foot and half to each dimension

JimS
11-27-2004, 07:52 AM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote Popcorn:</font><hr> On their web site under the professional model it says:

"- 1 1/4" Matched Italian Slate"


I would understand that to mean more then one slate on the table. They are extra thick though.
<hr /></blockquote>

The Diamond Pro, the one I have in my home, is 3 pc slate, 1.25" thick. I thought that's what I said earlier.

As Fred pointed out, the Smart table is one pc slate. That's what they use in the tournaments. They don't have to tear the slate down and recover. They can just roll it out on a cart.

Popcorn
11-27-2004, 08:47 AM
They are just presenting the bare minimum which is what most people want to know. it's not meant that it is the ideal size. Most people are just trying to fit a table into an existing room and hope it will somehow be workable without tearing out a wall or something. If you are building a room you would not use those dimensions, you would provide a sitting area, plenty of room around the table and so on. My room is 25 x 25 and SPetty has a whole separate building for her pool tables. Nice when you can do it, but I would not want to discourage someone getting a table if they have enough room even if it's not ideal.

Ives
11-27-2004, 10:53 AM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote Fred Agnir:</font><hr> <blockquote><font class="small">Quote Ives:</font><hr> http://www.bestbilliard.com/resources/dimensions.htm

this will give you a rough idea of room sizes. hope it helps.
<hr /></blockquote>It is my sincere hope that nobody ever points to this "room dimension site" again. In a sentence, it sucks. People will be very disappointed if they have a room (according to this bogus chart) that "fits" a 57" cue.

Fred &lt;~~~ add a foot and half to each dimension <hr /></blockquote>

Hey Fred
what exactally is it about the info that sucks. I'm not argueing with you. Just wondering what it was that you didn't like about it. I don't want to give out links to bad info. /ccboard/images/graemlins/blush.gif

Rod
11-27-2004, 11:56 AM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote scotty1111:</font><hr> I recently built a room for a pool table the final size is 13"8" by 17'6" will this give me enough room for a standard 7ft table <hr /></blockquote>

I guess I don't understand why it's built before asking. If you had an idea what size why wasn't it built a couple of feet larger? That instead of a squeeze in fit. It's to small really.

Rod
11-27-2004, 12:02 PM
Not Fred but that site really sucks. 58" cues are used now, not a big deal but 14'2" wide for a 9 footer??? 13'3" for a bar box. Hell you need at least 14'2" for a bar table.

I sure wouldn't use that site unless you give it to migets with short cues. LOL

Popcorn
11-27-2004, 01:16 PM
After a second look, those numbers would be very tight only allowing about 2 inches of back swing at times. They want to sell pool tables I guess. You could get away with them if you have no choice, you can play all the way around the table but it's tight.

Fred Agnir
11-27-2004, 05:55 PM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote Popcorn:</font><hr> They are just presenting the bare minimum which is what most people want to know. <hr /></blockquote>I think they're presenting less than the bare minimum.

My room has less area than the ideal, but more room than what they put down. And I'm at the limits when the cueball rests on the cushion on two directions.

That site sucks.

Fred

Popcorn
11-28-2004, 12:18 AM
After I made that post I took another look and did the math and they are off by a few inches for sure.

Brady_Behrman
11-28-2004, 10:51 PM
Perfect as long as you have no obstacles. Need 5 feet around the table. so 3 1/2 x 7 would need 13 1/2 by 17

Your good to go. Get a Corner chair..lol

Brady Behrman

Fred Agnir
11-30-2004, 07:28 AM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote Brady_Behrman:</font><hr> Perfect as long as you have no obstacles. Need 5 feet around the table. so 3 1/2 x 7 would need 13 1/2 by 17

Your good to go. Get a Corner chair..lol

Brady Behrman <hr /></blockquote>I just wanted to take this opportunity to say that although this might be a good guideline, people have to remember that a pool table is NOT twice as long as its width. Adding 5'x 2 to the outside dimensions will surprise someone when they come up short on the width.

Fred

Popcorn
11-30-2004, 07:32 AM
Sure it is, if you are working from the inside playing surface. 100 x 50, 88 x 44 and so on.

Fred Agnir
11-30-2004, 09:32 AM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote Popcorn:</font><hr> Sure it is, if you are working from the inside playing surface. 100 x 50, 88 x 44 and so on. <hr /></blockquote>But that was clearly not what was being suggested.

Fred

Tom_In_Cincy
11-30-2004, 10:55 AM
Brady,
As usual, the rails and sides of the tables are forgotten during these measurements.

For a 7 by 3 1/2 foot table:

Add 6 inches to each side of the table.

for the long sides 7 feet plus 6 inches on both ends, will total 8 feet

for the short sides 3.5 feet plus 6 inches on both sides, will 4.5 feet.

10 feet (cue length) plus 8 feet table length = 18 feet
10 feet (cue length) plus 4.5 feet table width = 14.5 feet

I always forgot to include the rail length, until Fred kept hitting me over the head with it everytime....

Tom &lt;----thinks Fred has made his point again. /ccboard/images/graemlins/grin.gif

Fred Agnir
11-30-2004, 12:03 PM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote Tom_In_Cincy:</font><hr> Brady,
As usual, the rails and sides of the tables are forgotten during these measurements.

For a 7 by 3 1/2 foot table:

Add 6 inches to each side of the table.

for the long sides 7 feet plus 6 inches on both ends, will total 8 feet

for the short sides 3.5 feet plus 6 inches on both sides, will 4.5 feet.

10 feet (cue length) plus 8 feet table length = 18 feet
10 feet (cue length) plus 4.5 feet table width = 14.5 feet

I always forgot to include the rail length, until Fred kept hitting me over the head with it everytime....

Tom &lt;----thinks Fred has made his point again. /ccboard/images/graemlins/grin.gif <hr /></blockquote>I would take the inside dimensions, add the rail widths, and then add the 10'. You end up with numbers right in line with Bob Jewett's FAQ.

Or, actually measure the outside dimensions, and add 10' to each dimension. For a 7' home table, this should end up with a size of 17' x 13'10" or so, depending on the table.

From there, it's a matter of personal constitution as to how much room you're willing to whittle away and still be able to cope with it. My 7' table is in a room a little smaller than the above.

Fred

Wally_in_Cincy
11-30-2004, 12:25 PM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote Fred Agnir:</font><hr>I would take the inside dimensions, add the rail widths, and then add the 10'. You end up with numbers right in line with Bob Jewett's FAQ.

Or, actually measure the outside dimensions, and add 10' to each dimension. For a 7' home table, this should end up with a size of 17' x 13'10" or so, depending on the table.

From there, it's a matter of personal constitution as to how much room you're willing to whittle away and still be able to cope with it. My 7' table is in a room a little smaller than the above.

Fred <hr /></blockquote>

But it depends on the rail width. You seem to be assuming a 6" rail width. Some as not quite that wide (mine)

I would measure cushion-nose to cushion-nose and add 11 feet. That would allow a 8" backswing on the stroke.

IMO

Bob_Jewett
11-30-2004, 12:46 PM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote Wally_in_Cincy:</font><hr> ...
I would measure cushion-nose to cushion-nose and add 11 feet. That would allow a 8" backswing on the stroke.
<hr /></blockquote>
Well, yes, and this is exactly what the RSB FAQ does, except it uses six inches for the backswing but it warns, "more for comfort."

What really irritates me is when someone quotes the numbers from sites that are trying to sell tables. Those sites never give cautions about how only 4 feet from table to wall might be uncomfortable.

Fred Agnir
11-30-2004, 06:10 PM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote Wally_in_Cincy:</font><hr> But it depends on the rail width. You seem to be assuming a 6" rail width.
<hr /></blockquote>Probably why I wrote "depending on the table." By adding 5' to each side (which is two inches longer than a standard 58" cue) plus the rail width (which can be from, say, 4-6 inches), that gives a backswing of 6-8" per side.

I'm only pointing out the danger of using the "add 10'" idea. If you're going to simply add 10', then you should add 10' to the outside dimensions. People will see that table is not twice as long as its width. If they don't measure, they will find that they'll be shorter by 2 or 3" of backswing on the width direction. Because the table isn't twice as long as it is wide.

But, if you have a tape measure in hand, might as well use to measure the nose to nose dimensions and and 128" to each dimension.

Fred