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View Full Version : 14 Yr Old beats Pro badly



DeadStrokeMan
11-25-2004, 12:32 AM
Yes - at $100.00 a game - my daughter kicked my arse at 9-ball. Part of my punishment for such a brutal beating is the posting of this.

Even though I managed to run a few racks - she still killed me.

I gave her the 6->9 wild ... *ouch*.

She'll pay now! I'll kick her arse next time around ..she'll see! She'll pay! Yeah!

wolfdancer
11-26-2004, 10:14 AM
Hey, a lot of views and no replies?
A $100 a game.....nice money, and to think I used to shine shoes and set pins in a bowling alley for my $$.
I should have been thinking how I could get into the old man's pocket......
A few years back, when I was running weekly tournaments, there was a father and his then 14 yr old son that used to play. I noticed the kid improving rapidly, and told his dad....you better enjoy beating him while you can, because you're not going to do it much longer. The guy actually took offense to that (we all have some ego problems)
Anyway the kid's about 19 now, one of the best young players in the area...unfortunately, his dad passed away.
I think he would have enjoyed seeing how good his son is.....might not even feel too bad about asking for the 7 when they played.
Might not be too long before you need a spot from your daughter........

Popcorn
11-26-2004, 10:21 AM
Kids can get good pretty quick. The first time I met Dennis Hatch his father wanted me to give him the 7, he maybe really needed the 8. In one year I needed the 7.

Ross
11-26-2004, 12:38 PM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote Popcorn:</font><hr> Kids can get good pretty quick. The first time I met Dennis Hatch his father wanted me to give him the 7, he maybe really needed the 8. In one year I needed the 7. <hr /></blockquote>

Popcorn, this is a fact that most of us hate to admit. Most players who later become pros pick the game up amazingly fast. Two or three years of serious play and suddenly they can beat all of local shortstops that have been playing all of their lives. It's called talent... Wish I had a lot more of it. /ccboard/images/graemlins/crazy.gif

Popcorn
11-26-2004, 12:59 PM
I'm telling you, Dennis was off the scale. He could have been the top player in the world. He plays every game, ran a hundred balls like it was nothing. Was runner up in the US open maybe the first time he entered. Dennis made Tommy Kennedy quit gambling and get religion. Dennis beat him out of all his money again, Tommy had just won a tournament and promptly lost it all to Dennis plus had his cue stolen the same day and I think he took it as a sign or something. I never saw him gamble again after that. He was a bad gambler anyway, he never knew when he couldn't win. You need confidence but also some reality. In tournaments that blind confidence is an asset but not when you gamble.

DeadStrokeMan
11-27-2004, 12:16 AM
Welp - me son is 17 (almost) and my daughter is 14. They fight/argue alot while playing so consequently they don't even play together. My daughter seems to show more interest in practice and playing. My son is ... but I think only to "please" me. Oh well, should have gotten the table years ago. Great kids - staight A's all the way. Would be nice to have a couple of "junior sharks" around /ccboard/images/graemlins/smile.gif

Wife won't play at all - she says "its dumb" and "boring" - lol. Dats cause she doesn't wanna go through the pain of learning. Wish I could "infuse" them all with ability and stroke. Hey. I wonder if that "stroke trainer" would help them? (probably just bore the trash out of them and drive them away)

DeadStrokeMan
11-27-2004, 12:19 AM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote Popcorn:</font><hr> I'm telling you, Dennis was off the scale. He could have been the top player in the world. He plays every game, ran a hundred balls like it was nothing. Was runner up in the US open maybe the first time he entered. Dennis made Tommy Kennedy quit gambling and get religion. Dennis beat him out of all his money again, Tommy had just won a tournament and promptly lost it all to Dennis plus had his cue stolen the same day and I think he took it as a sign or something. I never saw him gamble again after that. He was a bad gambler anyway, he never knew when he couldn't win. You need confidence but also some reality. In tournaments that blind confidence is an asset but not when you gamble. <hr /></blockquote>

Gambling on the table is an "Art". I'm much much better at it than in the younger years, but there are always "personalities" out there that can dig into your pychi &lt;sp&gt; and toss your game. Some people are addicted to "gambling". I like to gamble on the pool game to give it a "purpose" (so to speak). For some folks - its just a problem. I have a friend that plays A+ all the way - gambles at every given opportunity - but he gambles on basketball, football - you name it. My guess is its a problem for him.