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mworkman
11-25-2004, 08:53 AM
When winding up for an all out hit on the break shot (max power) does anyone focus in on the cue ball on the hit instead on the object ball? I seem to get more control that way.. I break from about a foot off the end rail and try to get a long follow through.

Mark

woody_968
11-25-2004, 10:22 AM
Within the last few weeks I started looking at the cueball instead of the OB during the break and feel I do get better results. This IMO is one of those exception shots when it is better to look at the cueball.

DeadStrokeMan
11-25-2004, 10:31 AM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote mworkman:</font><hr> When winding up for an all out hit on the break shot (max power) does anyone focus in on the cue ball on the hit instead on the object ball? I seem to get more control that way.. I break from about a foot off the end rail and try to get a long follow through.

Mark <hr /></blockquote>

In my younger, less experienced years, I didn't pay attention to the focus: Hence it was sometimes OB, sometimes CB.

I pay explicit attention to this today. Its actually quite insane to HURL that cueBall down at light speed without PINPOINTING the precise location of contact.

I OB, CB, OB, CB ...Then OB and dial in on an "atom" on the OB - Trust your stroke. Be sure to hit this precise point to maintain total control of the CB. Whats the point in a blasting break if the CB is "randomly" flying around the table.

a) You stand a huge chance of scratch
b) You stand a huge chance of a "louzy leave"
c) You can hurt someone by bouncing the CB off the table.

I try to leave the CB in the center of table after the 9 Ball snap.

On 8 ball snap - if the rack is "crummy" I break off the 2nd ball back with draw ...causing the CB to come off the rail and behind the rack. If the rack is good - I go for the head ball and put the CB in the center of the table.

Watch Santos Sambajon's break ...watch the control of CB after a 27 MPH snap - Without the precise control of CB leave its almost pointless to even be breaking.

1Time
11-25-2004, 11:49 AM
I fully agree with DeadStrokeMan, very valuable advise for breaking.

I also imagine a laser beam like line extending through the length of my cue and through my intended point of contact with the OB. Pinpointing the intended point of contact on the OB for me is like dialing in the focus on a microscope.

Just last night I started using an open bridge to break 9-ball and found I can more consistently get the CB to where I want it to impact the one ball than I can with a closed bridge. The open bridge helps moderate the speed of my break which gives me more control over the CB and more consistent results.

I've always broke 9-ball with a closed bridge and in doing so I've tended to break "too hard", that is, to the point of not getting the CB to impact where I want it to on the one ball. So, I've found a harder break in 9-ball is better only IF I can consistently control the CB's point of impact with the one ball.

SPetty
11-25-2004, 04:30 PM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote 1Time:</font><hr> I fully agree with DeadStrokeMan...<hr /></blockquote>Yeah, but don't forget, this is a man that gets beat bad by a 14 year old girl! /ccboard/images/graemlins/laugh.gif

Barbara
11-25-2004, 05:19 PM
mworkman,

When I was learning about breaking, I was taught to look at the cue ball last after lining up with where you're going to hit the rack. I would do my eye pattern, but instead of looking at the OB last, I would focus on the CB last.

It's the only time I focus on the CB last and I have hardly miscued because of it.

Barbara

mworkman
11-26-2004, 11:41 AM
There appears to be some differing oppinions on this. I'm going to try to chart it for myself with my break. Keeping track of how many times I scratch with each and also, how many times I make a ball. This will probably take some time tho' as it should have a large number of breaks to rule out just luck.

Thanks, Mark (at least I'm not the only one who was doing this) /ccboard/images/graemlins/laugh.gif

ceebee
11-26-2004, 02:39 PM
... the break shot stroke is just like the shooting stroke, except for the added swiftness of the forward stroke, in an attempt to build speed.

Accuracy is the key ingredient in the Break Shot. Speed is sometimes a necessity, but only added to the point of control. If your address is correct, your stroke will be too.... unless the player is a 3 speed trying the break like Strickland or Bustamante.

The Cue Ball can't be hit like a golf ball. You don't have a 40 yard wide target to hit. In golf you have to look at the golf ball in order to hit it, things are different in the game of Pool.

I suggest looking at a spot on the lead ball. Disciplined practice will give you good hand/eye coordination to hit the point, like any other pool shot.

Good Luck

woody_968
11-26-2004, 05:01 PM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote ceebee:</font><hr>
Accuracy is the key ingredient in the Break Shot. Speed is sometimes a necessity, but only added to the point of control. If your address is correct, your stroke will be too....

<hr /></blockquote>

True, but if your address is correct, and you are lined up properly, you shouldnt need to look at the head ball if your stroke is correct. At that point the only thing that would make you mis-hit the rack would be striking the cueball off center. The added speed of the break shot makes an off center hit deflect even more than normal, so this puts a premium on center ball hit (assuming your lined up right.

Most pool players look at the object ball last on almost every shot (me included) but if you look at billiard players, where accuracy of strike on the cueball is a premium, most of them look at the cueball last.

theinel
11-26-2004, 06:13 PM
To answer your question directly I would say that unless you are afraid of miscuing you should look at the object ball last and actually try to drive the ball through, not to, that point letting your stick follow through on the same line as far as you can.

To answer your question indirectly I would suggest that you rarely use the all out max power break because, as many others in this thread have pointed out, you are much better served by accuracy and cue ball control than you are by a few extra mph on an uncontrolled cue ball.

Rod
11-26-2004, 07:14 PM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote mworkman:</font><hr> When winding up for an all out hit on the break shot (max power)

Not a good idea. Players of any games save a little in reserve.

does anyone focus in on the cue ball on the hit instead on the object ball? I seem to get more control that way..

It really doesn't make any difference which you look at last. Look at whitey if you want, but looking at it sure dosen't mean your going to hit it square. The same goes for the head ball. One of those full blown wind up killer trys, you might as well look at the moon. LOL


I break from about a foot off the end rail and try to get a long follow through.

Mark <hr /></blockquote>

Break from where ever but closer to the rack is better, more accurate. Vary your speed as well, sometimes tables give up more at a slower speed. The follow thru is natural happening with a well timed stroke, it's not a forced motion. I usually end up 4" or more inches past the joint on the break, thats not full blown either.

Tell you what, I love to play players that think harder is better. I see them all the time making the same mistakes. Then they get mad when they lose. /ccboard/images/graemlins/laugh.gif

Rod

Rip
11-26-2004, 08:49 PM
Rod,
You're sooo right about the softer speed sometimes resulting in a more productive break. I recently bought a Sledgehammer B/J stick. My first instinct was to overpower every break because--what the heck--this stick was made for crushing the rack! Well, my break immediately became less effective. Fewer balls were dropping and whitey was totally out of control. I decided to decrease the power and increase my focus on hitting the one ball on the nose. Improvement was instant.
Regards,
Rip~understands less is sometimes more! BWAAAAAAAAAAA!

Sid_Vicious
11-26-2004, 10:26 PM
"so this puts a premium on center ball hit"

You added if you were lined up right...how's a pool player drop for a 9 break without a line? You should always stroke a CB in 9 staring at he cue ball last. it's just the way it works best....sid

Tom_In_Cincy
11-27-2004, 12:04 AM
If your goal on the break is to make a ball and keep the cue ball in the middle of the table, power IMO is not the answer, it is all about accuracy.

A 16mph break that accomplishs this goal, is IMO, much better than a thunder Power break.

I try to hit the one ball as full as possible, with center ball and as accurate as possible. My break speed is about the same speed as hitting the cue ball from the head string and it going down the table and back 2 times.

I look at the one ball last, but I also look at the cue ball and then the one ball back and forth and then focus on the one ball.

HTH

DeadStrokeMan
11-27-2004, 12:21 AM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote SPetty:</font><hr> <blockquote><font class="small">Quote 1Time:</font><hr> I fully agree with DeadStrokeMan...<hr /></blockquote>Yeah, but don't forget, this is a man that gets beat bad by a 14 year old girl! /ccboard/images/graemlins/laugh.gif <hr /></blockquote>

HEY HEY NOW! - LOL ...Had it comin' /ccboard/images/graemlins/tongue.gif