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View Full Version : Ivory ferrules - Facts, Do's & Don'ts



woody
11-27-2004, 07:05 PM
I shoot with an older custom cue and to my surprise I was informed it has an ivory ferrule. I would like to know some facts about ivory and the do's and don'ts to take care of it. Thanks in advance.

sliprock
11-27-2004, 08:21 PM
If you're coming in from the cold, allow the cue to warm to room temperature before you start playing. I've heard that cold ivory ferrules are brittle. I'd also recommend a pad under the tip. A pad might not be needed, but it could protect the ferrule if the tip gets low.

Rich R.
11-28-2004, 06:11 AM
In addition to these good suggestions, at least twice a year put a little baby oil on your ivory ferrules.

SecaucusFats
11-28-2004, 01:02 PM
I would add that you should never use any abrasive or bleaching cleaners (like Comet or Soft Scrub) on an Ivory ferrule. If it gets dirty a little toothpaste will do the job nicely and will not harm the ivory.

SF

Rich R.
11-28-2004, 01:37 PM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote SecaucusFats:</font><hr> I would add that you should never use any abrasive or bleaching cleaners (like Comet or Soft Scrub) on an Ivory ferrule. If it gets dirty a little toothpaste will do the job nicely and will not harm the ivory. <hr /></blockquote>
I have found that most marks will easily come off the ivory with a damp paper towel. The ease of keeping the ivory ferrules clean is one of the reasons I like them. /ccboard/images/graemlins/grin.gif

Barbara
11-28-2004, 01:44 PM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote Rich R.:</font><hr> In addition to these good suggestions, at least twice a year put a little baby oil on your ivory ferrules. <hr /></blockquote>

Really?? Who told you to do this and what does this do for the ferrule?

Barbara

Rich R.
11-28-2004, 02:12 PM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote Barbara:</font><hr> Really?? Who told you to do this and what does this do for the ferrule? <hr /></blockquote>
Barbara, I read it at a couple of different locations. Unfortunately, I no longer remember where. /ccboard/images/graemlins/confused.gif
Supposedly, it puts some moisture back into the ivory and makes it less brittle.

If your cue guy tells you that this is not necessary, please let me know. I'm feeling a little guilty, because I haven't done it for a while. /ccboard/images/graemlins/tongue.gif

dg-in-centralpa
11-28-2004, 02:20 PM
Barbara - Richard Black suggests a little baby oil several times a year on the ivory ferrules, ivory joints, and butt cap as well.

DG

SPetty
11-28-2004, 02:27 PM
I don't know the reason, but it's probably the same reason jewelers tell you to put mineral oil on your opals. Some kind of conditioning/moisturing affect, probably.

ryushen21's friend Shin has a brown looking ferrule that ryushen21 told me is brown because it's a really old cue with really old ivory. Does ivory turn dark over the years? Or should/could it be cleaned up and made white again?

WaltVA
11-28-2004, 03:01 PM
Ivory yellows in the dark - see here (http://www.howtocleananything.com/hca_article_ivory.htm) for info on ivory piano keys that may be helpful. (Another source suggested cleaning by rubbing with salt and lemon juice on a soft cloth.)

Walt in VA

BLACKHEART
11-28-2004, 03:02 PM
/ccboard/images/graemlins/smile.gifI don't know why you would put oil on the joint or butt cap, they probably have a clear coat over them. As far as for the ferrule goes, I have never done anything to my Ivory ferrules. Maybe I'm just lucky. I make all of my personal Qs with Ivory. The Q I'm playing with is 6 years old &amp; has an Ivory ferrule. I break &amp; play with it &amp; have had no problem. I just finished making a new Q, for myself, that has Ivory at the ferrule,joint &amp; butt cap. I'll break it in tomorrow in league play...JER

Rip
11-28-2004, 05:49 PM
I've asked several well known cue makers about the care of ivory ferrules and joints. The consensus was that if you live in a very dry climate, it wouldn't hurt to rub a little mineral oil or baby oil on the ivory. Ivory supposedly contains natural oils that would tend to diminish over time. They also agreed they've never heard of a problem caused by ivory being too dry. I live in the desert and haven't lubricated the ivory on my ferrules. I played with a cue today that had 25 year old ivory ferrules and they were fine.
I'm using IvorX ferrules currently so it's not a problem.
Happy Holidays,
Rip

SpiderMan
11-29-2004, 10:00 AM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote sliprock:</font><hr> If you're coming in from the cold, allow the cue to warm to room temperature before you start playing. I've heard that cold ivory ferrules are brittle. I'd also recommend a pad under the tip. A pad might not be needed, but it could protect the ferrule if the tip gets low. <hr /></blockquote>

The pad is excellent advice for any non-capped ferrule, but especially for ivory (capped or not, because of it's grain structure). Many people do not understand the purpose of the pad - it is not to absorb shock.

As a tip is used, it gets compressed by the frontal impact. As a result, it tries to "spread" to the sides. Since it's glued to the ferrule, it will try to spread the ferrule also. This can result in ferrule splitting, which you can see, or breaking down of the glue holding the ferrule to the tenon, which you can't see but will eventually hear.

The pad is made of a material that resists stretching, so it provides mechanical isolation between the ferrule and the sideways-spreading tip.

SpiderMan

Deeman2
11-29-2004, 10:20 AM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote SpiderMan:</font><hr> <blockquote><font class="small">Quote sliprock:</font><hr> If you're coming in from the cold, allow the cue to warm to room temperature before you start playing. I've heard that cold ivory ferrules are brittle. I'd also recommend a pad under the tip. A pad might not be needed, but it could protect the ferrule if the tip gets low. <hr /></blockquote>

The pad is excellent advice for any non-capped ferrule, but especially for ivory (capped or not, because of it's grain structure). Many people do not understand the purpose of the pad - it is not to absorb shock.

As a tip is used, it gets compressed by the frontal impact. As a result, it tries to "spread" to the sides. Since it's glued to the ferrule, it will try to spread the ferrule also. This can result in ferrule splitting, which you can see, or breaking down of the glue holding the ferrule to the tenon, which you can't see but will eventually hear.

The pad is made of a material that resists stretching, so it provides mechanical isolation between the ferrule and the sideways-spreading tip.

SpiderMan <hr /></blockquote>

<font color="blue"> Spiderman,

My Balabuska has two shafts, one has had an ivory ferule since 1969, the other since about 1978 (original spilt on that one). Both look good but have never been broken with and have no signs of checking or cracking. I may put some oil on them just in case. Do you think it is worth the effort to add pads under these as I will never play with the cue again? (my grandson may, one day) If so, maybe you would do this for me? As well, maybe I should keep the oldest shaft as is since changing it any might impact the value of the cue(for my Grandson, not me). </font color>

Deeman

SpiderMan
11-29-2004, 11:39 AM
Deeman,

I wouldn't mess with them if they aren't to be played with in the near future. Might as well wait until the grandson is ready, then decide what to use. Unless you just want them to look good in the meantime, in which case I'm the best guy for the job /ccboard/images/graemlins/wink.gif

SpiderMan

Deeman2
11-29-2004, 02:13 PM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote SpiderMan:</font><hr> Deeman,

I wouldn't mess with them if they aren't to be played with in the near future. Might as well wait until the grandson is ready, then decide what to use. Unless you just want them to look good in the meantime, in which case I'm the best guy for the job /ccboard/images/graemlins/wink.gif

SpiderMan <hr /></blockquote>

<font color="blue"> They still look good so I'll leave them alone. However, any of my other cues will go directly to you for attention. I may send a shaft to you via Tony "Molasses" that I would like to try a layered tip on. No, I'm not convinced they are all that yet, but I'm the guy who still thinks the earth is flat...It's a 314 shaft for my Schon..Don't use the 314 so I might as well check them out (layered stuff) with it.

Tori just said, "Oh my God. You'll be down to only a few dozen shafts if you send that off!!! /ccboard/images/graemlins/shocked.gif</font color>

Deeman

woody
11-29-2004, 05:38 PM
Thanks to all, I appreciate the advice.

bsmutz
11-30-2004, 04:07 PM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote SPetty:</font><hr> ryushen21's friend Shin has a brown looking ferrule that ryushen21 told me is brown because it's a really old cue with really old ivory. Does ivory turn dark over the years? Or should/could it be cleaned up and made white again? <hr /></blockquote>
I played with a guy once that had a brown ferrule and he said it was made from a walrus tusk. Could be the same with Shin's.

SpiderMan
12-01-2004, 06:53 AM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote bsmutz:</font><hr> <blockquote><font class="small">Quote SPetty:</font><hr> ryushen21's friend Shin has a brown looking ferrule that ryushen21 told me is brown because it's a really old cue with really old ivory. Does ivory turn dark over the years? Or should/could it be cleaned up and made white again? <hr /></blockquote>
I played with a guy once that had a brown ferrule and he said it was made from a walrus tusk. Could be the same with Shin's. <hr /></blockquote>

I once made a ferrule out of a piece of deer antler, and it also came out a little darker. The polished antler showed a very pronounced grain pattern, ie variation in color and staining on the sides. It actually looked sort of pretty to me. No idea on durability though, as I've lost track of the stick.

SpiderMan

Dagwood
12-01-2004, 12:43 PM
One of my friends makes joints and ferrules out of deer antler. It does tend to come out a little darker, and as previously stated it has a very pronounced grain. I believe though, that the hit it gives to the cue is a little harder...what's the consensus out there?

BLACKHEART
12-01-2004, 09:02 PM
/ccboard/images/graemlins/smile.gifDeer antlers fall from the deer, each year &amp; new ones are grown to replace them. Deer antlers are full of blood. As the time comes for them to drop their antlers, the blood begins to drain from them. Finally they are drained of blood &amp; drop off. If antlers from a killed deer are used for ferrules, the blood in them turns the ferrules a rose color, when they are polished. If antlers are used that have fallen from the deer, the ferrules will be white or slightly gray. A ferrule from a fallen antler gives a hit somewhat like Ivory, but stronger...JER

Cueless Joey
12-01-2004, 11:01 PM
I agree.
Making those antler collars is a task.
Picking the right ones and cutting/turning them.
They also stink like hell. Absolutely the stinkiest smell one can legally make. /ccboard/images/graemlins/tongue.gif
Hey Dag, if your friends sell em antlers, pls lemme know.