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Chopstick
11-29-2004, 08:23 AM
I had heard this about my straight pool game before but, I didn't really understand what it meant. I ran across this excersise that demonstrates it real well. Take four balls and place them at random on one half the table. Not close to the rail and not too close to each other. like this.

START(
%AK9J3%BI6R2%EP8M4%HN3R5%Pg6Q6

)END

Now with ball in hand, make a plan to make all four balls with stop or near stop shots. You can use all the pockets. The cue ball must not move more that two inches after making the ball. The above pattern can be made with four stop shots. Do you see the pattern?

It's a cool mental exercise. When you do one set them up again in a different pattern. 95% of the time there will be an optimal pattern where the cue ball will move no more than two inches after contacting an object ball, no matter how the balls are arranged. If you can do four easily try five or six.

Eric.
11-29-2004, 08:49 AM
Hi Chopstick,

BIH behind the headstring or BIH anywhere?

If it's anywhere, then the layout is simple. I would shoot 5,1,2,8 :

START(
%AK9J3%BI6R2%EP8M4%HN3R5%PM7L2%Wq3Z3%XQ7M7%YE5E2%Z K4I9%[D8Y7
%\I4R8%]o9Z8%^O0R7
)END


Eric

Chopstick
11-29-2004, 09:24 AM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote Eric.:</font><hr> Hi Chopstick,

BIH behind the headstring or BIH anywhere?

If it's anywhere, then the layout is simple. I would shoot 5,1,2,8 :

START(
%AK9J3%BI6R2%EP8M4%HN3R5%PM7L2%Wq3Z3%XQ7M7%YE5E2%Z K4I9%[D8Y7
%\I4R8%]o9Z8%^O0R7
)END


Eric <hr /></blockquote>

It's BIH anywhere.

daviddjmp
11-30-2004, 01:33 PM
Here is a little more challenging drill. Jim Rempe has this at the end of his "How To Run A Rack In Straight Pool" tape. Throw out a rack of balls with none of them closer than 4 inches from a cushion. Spread them out evenly. Then, take ball in hand and run them all without allowing the cue ball to hit a cushion. This will help with patterns and cue ball control. It is difficult, especially when you get down to the last third of the rack. A great practice drill, though-