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yegon
12-13-2004, 03:01 PM
For the last weeks I have not trained a lot so I decided to work on my mental game while loosing :-) during a tournament that was held yesterday. I decided to study my own game during a tournament and remember my mistakes to improve in training later.

I was not worried about the outcome of the matches, nothing seemed to trouble me. In the first match everything seemed to work fine until I missed some simple shots and thet the things got really ugly. I missed more and more shots, even with ball in hand. Can you believe it? I knew it was the past bad shots that were putting me deeper into the hole, I tried to shake it but I was not able to. I lost the match and could settle down and play good only after waiting an hour for the next one.

After thinking about it I came up with the idea to develop a "shakeoff routine". I think it would be good to have a routine I could go through to disconnect from the past failures. I mean something you can rely on and can perform automatically, something like a pre shot routine but aimed at a different goal. It could be a phrase or a movement, what do you think? Do you guys use something like this? What does your routine look like.

daviddjmp
12-13-2004, 03:26 PM
As simplistic as this might sound, one of the main tenets of the two books I have read on the mental game both say the same thing. Have fun. Enjoy yourself. Play pool for the pleasure of playing pool. Remember why you began playing in the first place. This has had a lot of value for me recently. The two books were "Pleasures of Small Motions" and a "Mind for Pool". One more thing Dick Lane said in an Accu-Stats player review of a 14.1 match he played with Johnny Archer is that when you have a chance on a sure shot, let your stroke out and pull the trigger. This does relieve a bit of pressure in any match-

yegon
12-13-2004, 05:10 PM
That is the strange thing about yesterday. I was not expecting to play great so I was not disappointed when I missed a shot. I was having fun, I was in observer mode looking at me playing without getting emotionally involved. But despite the lack of the usual frustration after a missed shot I kept missing. This was too much to be a coincidence, the misses had to be caused by the previous ones. I played beyond my expectation all day except for a 15 minute missing streak that I could not break out of. I am at a loss as to what really happened. I thought you miss shots after missing a simple one because you are angry with yourself, but this was not the case here. Any Ideas?

daviddjmp
12-13-2004, 08:15 PM
A couple of things:

Try not to look at the score. Watch the table when your opponent is shooting and try to identify in your mind when he may easily get out of line. When you get a shot, pretend it is the beginning of the match. Play the table, focus on the layout-

JimS
12-14-2004, 06:10 AM
I need to slow down, go through my pre shot routine carefully, take dead aim.

cheesemouse
12-14-2004, 09:16 AM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote yegon:</font><hr> I think it would be good to have a routine I could go through to disconnect from the past failures. I mean something you can rely on and can perform automatically, something like a pre shot routine but aimed at a different goal. It could be a phrase or a movement, what do you think? Do you guys use something like this? What does your routine look like. <hr /></blockquote>

I use a phrase like a mantra to get me started for the day, game, match or whatever. In the beginning I am very concious of the phrase tumble in my mind but eventually it becomes more like elevator music and I just focused on the job at hand with my eyes inside the rails. If my eyes leave the surface of the table inside the rails I give myself a break to wonder why, deal with the distraction, then get back to business...the phrase is: BE HERE NOW...this seems to bring my 'A' to the table faster and more often than not.

daviddjmp
12-14-2004, 10:59 AM
This is a very important point. You cannot eliminate distractions, as that is impossible. You need to aceept them, process them, and get back to your game-

Stretch
12-14-2004, 11:13 AM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote daviddjmp:</font><hr> As simplistic as this might sound, one of the main tenets of the two books I have read on the mental game both say the same thing. Have fun. Enjoy yourself. Play pool for the pleasure of playing pool. Remember why you began playing in the first place. This has had a lot of value for me recently. The two books were "Pleasures of Small Motions" and a "Mind for Pool". One more thing Dick Lane said in an Accu-Stats player review of a 14.1 match he played with Johnny Archer is that when you have a chance on a sure shot, let your stroke out and pull the trigger. This does relieve a bit of pressure in any match- <hr /></blockquote>

I can vouch for that Dave. I like the "thwap!" sound the ob makes when it fires into the back of the pocket. About the mental preperation thing....Ya it's a good idea to have something that brings you out of a funk. I used to think that i could just play through a couple of bad racks and tuff it out till i found a no brainer layout to find my groove but most often the match would just get away on me before that happened. So i have a rule now that i believe saved me a lot of matches and it might help others. USE YOUR TIME OUT! lol

I like to hit the washroom splash cold water on my face, call myself the worst things i can think of till there's nuthin left then let it go.........step into a cubical sit and meditate for a few minuits, warm up by shadow boxing, bobbing weaveing a jab hear an upercut there, one good knockout punch and i'm ready to go back out and fight back. Sometimes despite the fact that i might be down a few racks, i feel fine. Like in 9 ball you can be loseing and you havn't even done anything wrong you know? If a guys just rolling over me with no end in sight i'll call a time out too, maybe it will cool him off. A lot can happen in your head in 5 or 10 min. St.

Deeman2
12-14-2004, 11:13 AM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote yegon:</font><hr> That is the strange thing about yesterday. I was not expecting to play great so I was not disappointed when I missed a shot. I was having fun, I was in observer mode looking at me playing without getting emotionally involved. But despite the lack of the usual frustration after a missed shot I kept missing. This was too much to be a coincidence, the misses had to be caused by the previous ones. I played beyond my expectation all day except for a 15 minute missing streak that I could not break out of. <font color="blue"> Bob Byrne's original book has a good section on this saying the laws of probablity say you will string together some misses, just as you will strings of made balls.</font color> I am at a loss as to what really happened. I thought you miss shots after missing a simple one because you are angry with yourself, but this was not the case here. <font color="blue"> IMO, you miss shots because of lack of knowledge of a shot, poor execution or lack of concentration. Have I got a cure? No, but good players are able, under pressure, to detach themselves from an outcome and focus on the execution. This reduces nervous pressure and keeps you "in the moment". </font color> Any Ideas? <font color="blue"> If you play a lot of tournaments under pressure you will learn to deal with misses or take up bowling. /ccboard/images/graemlins/smirk.gif</font color>

Good Luck...

Deeman<hr /></blockquote>

catscradle
12-14-2004, 11:22 AM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote yegon:</font><hr> For the last weeks I have not trained a lot so I decided to work on my mental game while loosing :-) during a tournament that was held yesterday. I decided to study my own game during a tournament and remember my mistakes to improve in training later.

I was not worried about the outcome of the matches, nothing seemed to trouble me. In the first match everything seemed to work fine until I missed some simple shots and thet the things got really ugly. I missed more and more shots, even with ball in hand. Can you believe it? I knew it was the past bad shots that were putting me deeper into the hole, I tried to shake it but I was not able to. I lost the match and could settle down and play good only after waiting an hour for the next one.

After thinking about it I came up with the idea to develop a "shakeoff routine". I think it would be good to have a routine I could go through to disconnect from the past failures. I mean something you can rely on and can perform automatically, something like a pre shot routine but aimed at a different goal. It could be a phrase or a movement, what do you think? Do you guys use something like this? What does your routine look like. <hr /></blockquote>

I would very strongly recommend reading The Inner Game of Tennis by Timothy Gallowey (sp?). It is far superiour to A Mind For Pool or Pleasures of Small Motions. You'll probably skip some pages which are strictly tennis oriented, but the rest is very valuable. IMO.

141and3c
12-14-2004, 06:06 PM
I recommended the Inner Game of Tennis a few weeks ago. It is the absolute best book to learning self confidence. "THE ART OF RELAXED CONCENTRATION" is key.