PDA

View Full Version : Can't break em hard anymore



johnnyt
12-15-2004, 01:24 PM
I would be interested in what you all thought about 1-pocket for a old guy that can't power break in 9-ball anymore. I have been playing pool for 57 years. 14.1 would work for me but no one plays it around here. Thank you.
Johnnyt

bsmutz
12-15-2004, 02:00 PM
I'd say go for it if you can find other players. Practice your banks down on the bottom rail if you're not real comfortable with them. Snooker and golf are good games also. I know a bunch of old timers in this area hang out together playing golf on the snooker table all day. It's a nice easy paced game that requires a good stroke and a good eye. I'd also work on finding a spot to break 9-ball from where you don't need a lot of power. You don't have to slam the rack to make balls. I've been practicing making the one in the side on the break and find that it's more of a finesse type of deal than a hit 'em as hard as you can thing. I wouldn't be adverse to trying to get the "youngsters" to play straight pool either. Sometimes all it takes is someone taking the time to explain the game and show how much fun it can be. I've made some snooker converts this way. Good luck and good shooting!

DavidMorris
12-15-2004, 02:42 PM
I can't speak to 1P as I don't play it (been meaning to start, though). I do like 14.1 but like with you nobody plays it around here so I'm usually playing solo. But 9-ball is my passion. Let me reiterate what was said about not needing a power break to break well, even for full racks like 8-ball but especially for 9-ball. Breaking is more about speed and timing than sheer power. I've been clocked breaking 9-ball at 14-18 mph, which is slow by pro comparison, and I usually break pretty well -- get a good spread, squat the CB when I hit it like I meant to, and usually make at least one ball. And that's breaking with my playing cue. With a lighter cue or harder tip I'd probably improve on that a bit. If I try to force a harder/faster break, I usually lose control of the CB and virtually NEVER have better results.

So if you prefer 9-ball, don't give up on it just because you can't slam the rack anymore. Practice the soft break, it can be very effective.

johnnyt
12-15-2004, 02:48 PM
Thank you both for your replies. I think i'm going to try 1-pocket. As far as 9-ball it takes too much out of me. Have to get slower game or retire. Sold all my cues and cases, but can always buy another cue.The last 2 are on Ebay now. Johnnyt

monkeydude20
12-16-2004, 04:21 PM
Dude, who ever said you need a hard break for nine ball. That's for all the bangers out there who don't know how to play pool like a champ. Man, I'm 17 years old, I got all the youth in the world and I still break medium/soft. That's all you need. Just the other day I was breaking with medium/soft speed and pocketed the nine ball against my opponent in the finals of the tournament I was in. Don't worry about breaking hard. It's definetly not essential.
The best part of not breaking hard also is being able to control the cue ball so that you stop it dead center on the table for good position. The best of luck to you.

Jk /ccboard/images/graemlins/smile.gif

One
12-16-2004, 04:39 PM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote monkeydude20:</font><hr> Just the other day I was breaking with medium/soft speed and pocketed the nine ball against my opponent in the finals of the tournament I was in. <hr /></blockquote>
It wasn't because of you that you made the 9-ball, he just racked the balls bad.

superB
12-31-2004, 05:20 PM
I'm able to get the c/b in the side pretty consistantly, but can someone explain how to break to make the 1 in the side? I think the break is probably the worst part of my game right now. Well, maybe my combos are worse. /ccboard/images/graemlins/confused.gif

onepocketfanatic
01-01-2005, 12:16 AM
I used to play a lot of 9 ball, and a guy I met at a hall invited me to play one pocket. Since then, I have given up the 9 ball. As a matter of fact, almost everyone in the hall I frequent that plays on the 9 footers plays one pocket now (even the young guys that didn't like it before). I like it because it is a game of patience, banks and moves. It is also one of the few pool games that you can learn a lot by watching someone that can really move.
Try it you'll like it, and if not you can always go back to 9 ball.

nhp
01-01-2005, 02:27 AM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote monkeydude20:</font><hr> Dude, who ever said you need a hard break for nine ball. That's for all the bangers out there who don't know how to play pool like a champ. Man, I'm 17 years old, I got all the youth in the world and I still break medium/soft. That's all you need. Just the other day I was breaking with medium/soft speed and pocketed the nine ball against my opponent in the finals of the tournament I was in. Don't worry about breaking hard. It's definetly not essential.
The best part of not breaking hard also is being able to control the cue ball so that you stop it dead center on the table for good position. The best of luck to you.

Jk /ccboard/images/graemlins/smile.gif <hr /></blockquote>

Hehehe well I hate to break it to you, but when you play at a champions speed, and you play against other champions, the break is the most important shot in the game. It's the guys with the 'monster' breaks that usually win. A monster break consists of two things- power and control of whitey. Unless, of course, the sardo rack is in use, then you can soft break like Corey Deuel all day long and run rack after rack.

I myself go thru phases with my break, where either I'm controlling the cueball real well and not getting alot of speed generated, or I'm getting alot of speed but the cueball is zinging around the table. For a short period of time I was able to slam the rack and get the cueball to squat maybe 2 out of 3 breaks. Making a ball on the break usually gives you such a huge advantage if you can see the first one. Even if the rack is all tied up and you can't run out, keeping control of the table by playing safe, etc., is golden.