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View Full Version : Worst Match Up Ever?



nhp
12-16-2004, 03:20 AM
Ok, so last time I asked about playing a guy some last pocket 8 ball, I was asking for the rules and strategies. We finally matched up, playing one-pocket. To refresh your memory, I am a better player than him by far in 9-ball or regular 8-ball. In last pocket 8-ball I'm not sure who's better. In one pocket, he is way better than me, since I don't play the game at all. The guy wouldn't play me 9-ball, and for some reason he wouldn't play last pocket 8-ball like I thought he would, so he offered me 10-8 in one pocket for $50 per game. The first game, he scratched 3 times in the beginning, and I beat him easily. The next 4 games he drilled me. Basically to describe both of us, I am the shotmaker with a way more powerful stroke than him, but this guy just bunts balls around, but he moves incredibly good. So I paid him the $150, and asked him for 10-6, but he said no. Instead, he offered to play me regular 8-ball, me spotting him 1 game to 3 for $100. I beat him two sets in a row, he never won a game. He quit me in 8-ball and asked me to play him 9-ball with me giving him the 6 out, and I said hell no. I don't think he'll ever play me again, and I don't want to play him either lol. It's funny how I am far superior to him on certain games, and he is far superior to me in other games, and we both need too much weight to beat the other in the other's best game. I guess him and me were not made to play each other. /ccboard/images/graemlins/grin.gif

Popcorn
12-16-2004, 06:58 AM
You should have asked for 8 to 6 instead of 10 to 8 try to get that next time. In the mean time if you don't plan on becoming a one pocket player you could practice running balls into one pocket as an exercise. It is not only fun but will develop your run out ability in the game. Practice banks as well. One pocket is actually a pretty aggressive game. If you are a good 9-ball player and he is basically a mover in the game of one pocket but not a guy who takes very many chances. You may be able to beat him just on shooting ability alone as long as you don't play to stupid. A good shooter makes the other players mistakes very costly even though they may not know the game that well. The mover doesn't usually capitalize on mistakes as much as they could and often gets beat by the shooter.

Here is my best advice though. If he is a good one pocket player you may be missing out on an opportunity to learn a little about the game. Make a fair game with the guy and play for a reasonable amount that won't cause either one of you to quit or get angry after just a few games. Maybe just $20.00 or $25.00 a game instead of $50.00. The deal is, in a short time you will improve at the game and be beating him even, You will be learning the game even if you don't realize it. You want to be proficient at all games not just one. It is fun when you can play anyone who walks in whatever they want to play and not feel like you are being a sucker. I like all around players, it think they are the better players even if they are not outstanding in any one game. I used to know an old guy who would back down most any road player that gave him a hard time with the offer of pick three games out of the rule book and I will pick three and lets play, bet what you want. I was always impressed with him how it never mattered what game he played, even billiards and snooker.

SpiderMan
12-16-2004, 09:39 AM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote Popcorn:</font><hr> I used to know an old guy who would back down most any road player that gave him a hard time with the offer of pick three games out of the rule book and I will pick three and lets play, bet what you want. I was always impressed with him how it never mattered what game he played, even billiards and snooker. <hr /></blockquote>

That's an intriguing challenge. Did anyone ever take him up on it, and what six games did they play? If I picked three games I know, and someone else picked three different ones, they'd probably have to teach me at least some of the rules to one or more.

SpiderMan

Popcorn
12-16-2004, 11:22 AM
The Guys name was Gean Skinner, he played everything well. I saw him beat a guy a $2500.00 game of straight pool as he was dying of cancer, he only lived two more weeks, he was a real player to the end. I never saw anyone take him up on it but it was usually a good starting point in making a game. I would say the choice of games would depend on who he was going to play since he seemed to have no weaknesses he could pick games like Banks, 3-C Billiards and maybe an obscure game like Cribbage. I saw him play a real good 3-C player straight rail billiards. It was amazing the 3-C player could not run 10 billiards while Gean would run 30 to 50 almost every turn. I saw him play a Canadian guy line up pool (A form of straight pool) who had beaten everyone around playing it. He even had a special rack to line up the balls. Gean played him and they played 150 point games and Gean ran over a 100 almost every game. I played the guy and even though it looks easy to run the balls, I had a hard time running 25 or more, it was pretty tricky he beat me every game.

Danny DiLiberto was also a player like that. He would go to Canada when he lived in Buffalo and play those snooker champions and then switch to 9-ball and play someone else. He could be playing one pocket and an hour later play golf on the 6 x 12 against top competition then later on that night jam up on a bar table like it was his specialty or something. There are not many players today that can command the respect as some of those older all around players who didn't complained about everything, Today's player, "I don't like the rules I'm going to quit, the table is too slow or fast, someone moved when I was shooting".