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mworkman
12-19-2004, 10:32 PM
When instructors talk about bridge length, how do they measure it? Would it be from the cueball to the tips of your fingers or to the loop? That would make a difference of a couple inches. I'm thinking it's the tips of the fingers or else my bridge might be kinda long. I bought a book from Phill Capelle and he says the bridge should be about 8" for an 8-ball player on a bar-box, so I'm just curious as to how it is measured..
Thanks, Mark

DavidMorris
12-19-2004, 10:57 PM
I don't know if Cappelle measures it to loop or fingertips, and I don't know if every author or instructor would measure it the same way.

But I don't see how it really matters -- your goal shouldn't be a specific number of inches. There is no exact measurement that fits all. Proper bridge length is something different for everybody. You should bridge far enough away from the cueball to be able to comfortably stroke while getting a proper follow-through of at least 4-6 inches. The longer the bridge length, the less follow-through and tip-to-CB accuracy. It all depends on your swing path, some people have long ones and some have short ones, and it has nothing to do really with your height or stature. I'm 6'2 and I have a short swing path for my height, something I struggled with until Scott Lee pointed it out to me. I shortened my bridge and now get much better CB action and accuracy.

JimS
12-20-2004, 06:37 AM
I figure it's to be measured from the edge of the cue ball to the point where the cue rests on my hand..whether open or closed bridge.

PQQLK9
12-20-2004, 08:13 AM
I agree

Chris Cass
12-20-2004, 11:38 AM
LOL Great question,

It's the size of the shaft that sticks out past the loop. It's also spoken as or assummed as an average. Mainly, because the distances change upon the amout of power you want to put behind the cb. That also is in alignment with the grip hand.

Regards,

C.C.

Fred Agnir
12-20-2004, 12:42 PM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote mworkman:</font><hr> I bought a book from Phill Capelle and he says the bridge should be about 8" for an 8-ball player on a bar-box, <hr /></blockquote>I wonder why he says this.

Each shot is different.

Fred

Alfie
12-20-2004, 06:48 PM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote mworkman:</font><hr> I bought a book from Phill Capelle and he says the bridge should be about 8" for an 8-ball player on a bar-box, <hr /></blockquote>What is the name of the book? Page number?

mworkman
12-20-2004, 08:32 PM
It was in "Play Your Best 8-Ball". Not sure the page number, but, it was towards the end where you set up a practice shot lining up 5 donuts between the corner pockets. It said to put the bridge donut about 8" behind the cuball. It did say that this may need some adjusting based on your bridge length. By the way, I like the book.
On this particular shot my bridge was about 12" separating the donuts, so I was wondering why I was soo long.
I've also read some stuff from Buddy Hall saying that most people have a longer bridge then needed, and I'm not the greatest shot maker, so shorting up my bridge is something I am going to experiment with. Not sure if this will work right but here is the shot. Donut object ball, donut cueball, donut 6" past cueball to check follow through, donut 8" before cueball for bridge placement and another one inbetween pocket and bridge donut.
START(
%AN7O5%BL8P7%CJ7O4%DL8N2%EM7P1%FK7P1%GK7N8%Hg6I3%I L7O4%JK8M6
%KJ7P7%LJ7N2%MK7Q3%NJ7Q9%OJ7M0%PN8U8%Ys5C3%Zh2H9%e B4a6%_f5J0
%`]6N3%aO3U4
)END

recoveryjones
12-20-2004, 09:14 PM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote mworkman:</font><hr>
I've also read some stuff from Buddy Hall saying that most people have a longer bridge then needed


Buddy's bridge is shorter than most for sure. It's amazing how he pulls the cue back ( on lots of shots) all the way to the ferrule and makes such a smooth stroke. By pulling the cue that far back with his short bridge, he has all the power nescesary for any shot in any game that pool offers.RJ

stickman
12-20-2004, 09:33 PM
I measure the length of the shaft at cueball impact to the point where my cue rests on my hand. (Same as JimS) My normal bridge is about 8". I vary according to the shot. I'm 6'6". Before I got my 60" cue I was normally holding the cue on the end of the butt. Now I'm on the grip. Backhand english never worked for me until I got the new cue. When using backhand english I use about a 12" bridge which puts my grip hand on the end, just like my old std. length cue. /ccboard/images/graemlins/grin.gif

bsmutz
12-21-2004, 01:31 PM
Shortening my bridge length and bringing my stroke hand closer to the bridge has made a noticeable improvement in my consistency and accuracy (when I can remember to shoot that way). Old habits are hard to break.

stickman
12-21-2004, 02:17 PM
There are many instances when I shorten my bridge. One example is when precision shot placement is critical, such as when there is only half a hole to shoot at. /ccboard/images/graemlins/grin.gif

daviddjmp
12-21-2004, 02:48 PM
I grew up on straight pool, so a short closed bridge is what everyone used back then. I still use it on 90 percent of all my shots, about 8" most of the time-

tateuts
12-21-2004, 04:23 PM
The bridge length and the stroke length are two different things. The bridge length is only meaningful in relation to how it supports the shaft during a players stroke.

In my opinion the bridge length should be at least 2" to 3" longer than a players stroke on most shots. I've seen players who habitually pull the ferrule and tip right through the loop on the way back. I personally think they would be much better off with a longer bridge or a shorter stroke, or both.

I prefer a fairly long bridge, 10" - 12", although my usual stroke length is probably only 6" to 7".

Chris

SpiderMan
12-22-2004, 11:18 AM
The most meaningful representation of "bridge length" would be from the contact point on the cueball to the point where the stick rests on your hand. That would be the "loop" for a closed bridge, or the "vee" for an open.

If they don't mean it this way, they should ... it equates bridge length to pivot distance (referencing back-hand-english techniques). Merely curling or stretching out your fingers shouldn't represent a change in bridge length.

SpiderMan

<blockquote><font class="small">Quote mworkman:</font><hr> When instructors talk about bridge length, how do they measure it? Would it be from the cueball to the tips of your fingers or to the loop? That would make a difference of a couple inches. I'm thinking it's the tips of the fingers or else my bridge might be kinda long. I bought a book from Phill Capelle and he says the bridge should be about 8" for an 8-ball player on a bar-box, so I'm just curious as to how it is measured..
Thanks, Mark <hr /></blockquote>

mworkman
12-22-2004, 05:33 PM
Thanks for all your replies. You have shed some light on this for me. I do think it should be measured from cueball to loop. Thanks, Mark

Chris Cass
12-23-2004, 02:01 AM
Hi Fred,

I believe Phil is talking on a average straight in shot. I could be wrong because I've never met the man but you sir are in the prime spot to ask and meet with many writers.

Regards,

C.C.~~reads your present as we speak. Thanks Fred for that wonderful poem. I think you have many tallents. homeboy Spike says hi. /ccboard/images/graemlins/grin.gif

doncartmill
12-25-2004, 09:13 AM
Bridge length is that distance from where the cue stick rests on the vee ,or in the loop,to the cue ball at address. Ideally this distance should be detirmined by the cue shaft you are using. "Pivot point" was mentioned and is defined as that point back from the tip,where if you aimed thru the center of the cue ball,and then did not move your bridge,but move the handle of your cue so the cue was now addressing the CB off center (with english )...when you made your stroke the CB would travel the original line of aim ,as if struck thru dead center. This is discussed at the following site.
http://www.platinumbilliards.com/rating_deflect.php?sid=fdcecd249e36d780b1344222bb2 f93ac In regard to their chart comparing cue ball deflection for the various shafts. Interesting read . We don't necessarily use the pivot point ,because the mind does such a wonderful job after years of shooting in making these adjustments to off set CB deflection without ever giving it a thought.
If you were to get a new cue ,or for a newbie, if an effort was made to bridge near the "pivot point" ...the effect of cue ball deflection would be reduced.

DSAPOLIS
12-25-2004, 09:32 AM
It is important to realize that this length will be different for everybody. I would stay away from "should be " statements mainly because everybody's backswing is different, and so is everybody's balance in their stance (which also has an effect on where you place your bridge hand). SOme shots do not give you the luxury of being able to place your bridge hand anywhere close to the cue ball. When that happens, your accuracy will depend on your balance, the fluidity of your stroke, and whether you trust either of them when you are faced with that situation. If you are consciously worrying about this, your moves, your actions and your thoughts will not be natural, fluid, or effective. I have an article entitled "Bridging The Gap" posted on many websites (possibly I posted it in this forum, don't remember), and it breaks down the different parts of the bridge. Remember that we are all put together differently physically and we all do not have the gift of natural ability to play the game of pool. Because of that, bridge length will vary from person to person,as it is what will set you apart from every other player much like the rhythm of your stroke.

Good Luck &amp; God Bless

nhp
12-25-2004, 11:56 AM
My bridge length is always different, for most shots. I really don't pay attention to my bridge length, I just play by feel. My friend told me that when I play I often use different lengths for different shots, and I don't even realize it.

doncartmill
12-25-2004, 09:32 PM
I am sorry you missed the point. The pivot point is a GIVEN for any particular shaft and is a function of the cue ball deflection (of that shaft). I know that we will not always be able to establish our bridge at the pivot point,however ,if you were a beginer or if you had a significant change in you shaft,it might be worthwhile to determine where the pivot point is on that new shaft and try to become comfortable bridging at the PP (as much as possible) Thereby reducing the effect of cue ball deflection. Go to the site below look at the chart,click on
"about pivot point" at the top of page.
http://www.platinumbilliards.com/rating_deflect.php?sid=fdcecd249e36d780b1344222bb2 f93ac

Alfie
12-26-2004, 12:35 AM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote doncartmill:</font><hr> I am sorry you missed the point. The pivot point is a GIVEN for any particular shaft and is a function of the cue ball deflection (of that shaft). I know that we will not always be able to establish our bridge at the pivot point,however ,if you were a beginer or if you had a significant change in you shaft,it might be worthwhile to determine where the pivot point is on that new shaft and try to become comfortable bridging at the PP (as much as possible) Thereby reducing the effect of cue ball deflection. Go to the site below look at the chart,click on
"about pivot point" at the top of page. [cut}<hr /></blockquote>re: pivot point vis-a-vis the bridge, back hand english, squirt (CB deflection), etc.- I like to use SPP (squirt pivot point) when referring to the distance from the tip at which the stick can be rotated from a center ball hit to any amount of side and yet maintain the same shot line. And the PP (pivot point) is the point around which the player pivots (usually but not always at the bridge) that gives a different stick aiming line. The SPP and the PP are not necessarily the same for a given shot and cue.

SPP- a definite property of a cue regarding squirt
PP- any ol' point of pivot determined by the shooter

doncartmill
12-26-2004, 11:50 AM
We are talking the same thing . At the site I mentioned,Pivot point is "defined" incontext with the chart ( Just as you define squirt pivot point) e.g. PP (or SPP) is a given to the specific shaft ,by definition and not the random placement of your bridge

Alfie
12-26-2004, 03:45 PM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote doncartmill:</font><hr> We are talking the same thing.<hr /></blockquote>My suggestion is that that site and everybody else, should refer to the SPP as the SPP rather than the PP which, depending on context, may or may not have anything to do with squirt. In so doing, we would be more precise and less ambiguous in our communications.

IMO

Qtec
12-27-2004, 05:08 AM
Are you seriously recommending that a begginer [ playing with the new Predator Z ] should, when using E, shoot with a bridge length of 13 inches?

Q

Pelican
12-27-2004, 09:15 AM
I have measured my step-sons bridge at 14 inches. I try to convince him this is too long as any error in stroke is tremendous when the tip gets to the CB.

tateuts
12-27-2004, 11:13 AM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote Qtec:</font><hr> Are you seriously recommending that a begginer [ playing with the new Predator Z ] should, when using E, shoot with a bridge length of 13 inches?

Q <hr /></blockquote>

Hi Qtec, how've you been? Good to see you.

Chris

doncartmill
12-27-2004, 01:03 PM
I didn't mean to tic you off,as we seem to have got into what some refer to as a pissing contest. Let me appoligize and start over
. The "squirt pivot point" is a GIVEN for any particular shaft and is a function of the cue ball deflection/squirt (of that shaft). I know that we will not always be able to establish our bridge at the "squirt pivotpoint",however ,if you were a beginer or if you had a significant change in you shaft,it might be worthwhile to determine where the "squirt pivot point" is on that new shaft and try to become comfortable bridging at the SPP (as much as possible) Thereby reducing the effect of cue ball deflection. Go to the site below look at the chart,click on
"about pivot point" )at the top of page.(what they are calling PP is in reality the SPP )
http://www.platinumbilliards.com/rating_deflect.php?sid=fdcecd249e36d780b1344222bb2 f93ac

Qtec
12-27-2004, 07:48 PM
Hi tateuts. whats your take on this?

Q

stickman
12-27-2004, 08:42 PM
It works for me. On my cue the pivot point is about 12"-13". I don't use backhand english all that much, but I know it works. On a shot with extreme english I've sometimes used it. I don't use a Predator, and it might not be much help for you. There are many times when the shot won't allow you to use such a long bridge. Most times I just use shot compensation.

Edit: I wouldn't recommend trying to teach a beginner to use Backhand english. There are many other things to learn first. I would try to teach how to shoot without any english to start.

tateuts
12-27-2004, 09:28 PM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote Qtec:</font><hr> Hi tateuts. whats your take on this?

Q <hr /></blockquote>

I don't know what the heck these guys are talking about. Did that clear it up for you?

Chris

DickLeonard
12-27-2004, 09:31 PM
Try this drill, place the object ball on the spot and the cueball on the intersection of the diamonds, one diamond up and one diamond over towards the side pocket. Line up 5 object balls along side of the end of the cueball.

Now shoot the ball into the corner pocket with just enuff speed to reach the pocket and stop at one ball a 2 1/4 inch follow thru, and mark where the cueball ends up, now shoot the same shot with the same power as the first shot but follow thru 41/2 inches and mark the cueball spot again, Now shoot the same shot with the same power and a 6 3/4 inch follow thru and mark the cueball spot again. Repeat the five follow thru distances and mark where the cueball stops.

You have just learned how to control the cueball with your length of follow thru, not the force that you hit the cueball with.####