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92corrado
12-27-2004, 06:24 PM
Hello all,

As you might know, I am new to the board and new to pool. However, recently I have been playing alot and learning as much as a I can. I have a real quick question for all the pool veterens out there. I am 17 and real cheap. Hahah. I am wondering if I can clean my ( very old) pool table with like carpet cleaner or mildly clean it with soap and water... or if I MUST use that official felt cleaner that I've seen around? Thank you for your help in advanced.

SPetty
12-27-2004, 07:31 PM
Vacuum it real good, then brush it real good, then vacuum it real good again. The goal is to get the chalk and talc and dust out from under the cloth and into the vacuum.

Then get a (slightly damp to almost wet, depending on who you listen to) clean towel and rub the cloth in one direction from head to foot. This helps even out the color and texture and removes even more chalk and talc and dust.

You can't really get out all the little white spots if that's what you're after, but this will give you a good start to a much cleaner cloth. I'm sure others will offer good advice as well.

Rod
12-27-2004, 07:49 PM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote SPetty:</font><hr> I'm sure others will offer good advice as well. <hr /></blockquote>

Why would they Spetty, you got it covered!! /ccboard/images/graemlins/laugh.gif If I added my two bits it would be damp cloth only. Ring out all the water possible. A few drops of vinegar to help cut oil could be used but it's not necessary.

Rod

woody_968
12-27-2004, 07:51 PM
SPetty has given you some good suggestions. I will say that using a vacume (I use a shopvac) alone doesnt do it, as she said you need to use a lint free rag with most of the water rang out to do a good job. If you play very much you will need to do this almost every day if you want to keep it clean. Mine gets filthy sometimes because I hate to take up my practice time cleaning the table LOL.

Troy
12-27-2004, 08:07 PM
That'll cover the subjuect nicely... Some may use WooliteŽ, but it's not necessary.

Troy
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote Rod:</font><hr> <blockquote><font class="small">Quote SPetty:</font><hr> I'm sure others will offer good advice as well. <hr /></blockquote>

Why would they Spetty, you got it covered!! /ccboard/images/graemlins/laugh.gif If I added my two bits it would be damp cloth only. Ring out all the water possible. A few drops of vinegar to help cut oil could be used but it's not necessary.

Rod <hr /></blockquote>

stickman
12-27-2004, 08:29 PM
Quick Clean works really good, but I'm the King of Cheap. /ccboard/images/graemlins/grin.gif How about a dollar for a big bottle of window cleaner? After thoroughly vacuuming, I lightly mist the felt with window cleaner. I have a large auto sponge and wipe the felt lengthwise. The sponge pulls up lots of chalk, powder, and other stuff that would otherwise eventually become trapped under the felt. The glass cleaner dries quickly. I used it at the poolhall for over a year with no problems.

Jim

92corrado
12-27-2004, 09:02 PM
Wow! Thank you so much guys. I appreciate all your tips and advice.

PQQLK9
12-27-2004, 09:21 PM
SPetty is no guy. /ccboard/images/graemlins/smile.gif

Sid_Vicious
12-28-2004, 01:36 AM
I was a stickler for keeping new simonas looking new when I had it installed, cleaned it with the damp towel method back then, but I personally don't struggle anymore except for the shopvac usage. I personally find that it looks and plays real well with only the vacuum job. I personally feel you'll waste play time being obsessed with trying to keep it pristene. Just clean it the once with the suggestions for the damp towel, and then basically let it be except for routine vacumming...sid~~~also doesn't mind the white dots, just means you are using you equipment for every type shot you'll need in the heat of the coming PH battles

Deeman2
12-28-2004, 06:09 AM
Just one little correction. Well, two. SPetty is a beautiful lady but matches up with the guys very well and...."There is no felt on a pool table."
/ccboard/images/graemlins/smirk.gif
Deeman

DavidMorris
12-28-2004, 08:53 AM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote Deeman2:</font><hr>"There is no felt on a pool table."
/ccboard/images/graemlins/smirk.gif
Deeman <hr /></blockquote>

LOL, I was biting my lip on that one too. I figured somebody would come along to set him straight though. /ccboard/images/graemlins/laugh.gif

PQQLK9
12-28-2004, 09:44 AM
Pool Table Felt
pad
Mali Pool Table Cloth Felt - 5 Colors to Choose From - Ideal for the Home Tables
pad Mali Pool Table Cloth Felt - 5 Colors to Choose From - Ideal for the Home Tables
pad
Mail &amp; Co., in business since 1826, has been manufacturing and distributing the finest billiard felt found in today`s commercial and residential markets.

When ordering Mali cloth you get one piece of cloth that is 62 inches wide. A templete will be provided for cutting the bed and the rails. Length various on table size see below:
pad
pad
pad
Simonis Pool Table Cloth Felt - #860 - Tournament Cloth Used By Pro Tours
pad Simonis Pool Table Cloth Felt - #860 - Tournament Cloth Used By Pro Tours
pad
#860 - PROFESSIONAL TOURNAMENT CLOTH

Developed especially for 9-Ball.Combed Worsted Wool and high thread count assure long lasting wear.Nap-free.Will not pill or fluff.Recommended for ALL Pocket Pool or Snooker games.
pad
/ccboard/images/graemlins/smile.gif /ccboard/images/graemlins/smile.gif /ccboard/images/graemlins/smile.gif

Deeman2
12-28-2004, 10:15 AM
There are three factors that affect the playability of a pool table. They are slate, rails and cloth. Billiard cloth is sometimes referred to as felt, but it really is not a felt at all. Real felt is generally comprised of compressed or matted fibers and billiard cloth is a woven fabric to ensure true, consistent control and roll of the balls. High quality billiard fabric is always comprised of wool and nylon for durability. U.S. Classic Billiards uses only the highest quality billiard cloth made by some of the world's largest manufacturers of billiard fabrics. Companies, such as, Champion, Mali and Fortsmann are the names you will see on our tables.

All of the cloth used on a U.S. Classic Billiards table is tournament rated, weighs 21 ounces and is a 75% wool 25% nylon blend. There are several brand names that you will see from time to time on TV, such as, Simonis or Tour Edition. These are high end, professional quality cloth that many recreational or casual players will never appreciate. We use the level right below the highest rated cloth on our tables. However, if a customer desires the very best, we sure can provide it.

Let me discuss one point of information about the weight or thickness of table cloth. Billiard cloth is measured in ounces per yard like carpet and comes in weights ranging from 16 ounces to 24 ounces. Unlike carpet, heavier or thicker does not mean it is better. Many lesser quality pool table companies will use a heavier cloth to camoflage inferior frame construction which results in poor seam matching on the slate. They use the heavier cloth to help absorb the seam and not allow it to affect ball roll. This may work in the short term, but generally the poor construction will cause other problems that will cost you money for repairs down the road. Additionally, heavier felt will also make the ball roll slower, like rolling a ball in sand. Conversely, lighter fabrics are too thin and do not provide much durability or ball control. This results in a ball that is harder to place or control and we all know pool is a game of positioning or placement.

<font color="blue"> Billiard cloth is sometimes referred to as felt, but it really is not a felt at all.</font color>

Just because you call a Duck a Duck does not make it a Duck.....Most of us prefer a worsted wool or other woven cloth. /ccboard/images/graemlins/shocked.gif /ccboard/images/graemlins/shocked.gif /ccboard/images/graemlins/shocked.gif although I do, on occasion, collect a little felt from my clothes dryer filter and will try and use it on my table next covering time.

DavidMorris
12-28-2004, 01:34 PM
Not sure where you posted that from, but like Deeman said, them calling it "felt" does not make it "felt." Sounds like someone who didn't know any better wrote that verbiage up.

While I've seen some pretty fuzzy billiard cloth that looked just like felt, to call Simonis 860 "felt" is just plain sacreligious. /ccboard/images/graemlins/smile.gif It's a woven cloth, obvious to the eye.

SnakebyteXX
12-28-2004, 02:11 PM
[ QUOTE ]
them calling it "felt" does not make it "felt." Sounds like someone who didn't know any better wrote that verbiage up.
<hr /></blockquote>

I don't fight the 'felt fight' any more. Over X-Mas my Niece's 25 year old completely pool ignorant husband saw my newly restored Brunswick Centennial for the first time (it's covered in Simonis 860 CLOTH). He turned to me after an admiring appraisal and said, "Looks like it's been re-carpeted." I simply said, "Yes, it has."

There's more important battles to be fought out there than this one. At least that's how I've 'felt' for quite some time now.

Snake &lt;-- Not a man of the 'cloth'

Chris Cass
12-28-2004, 02:49 PM
92coorado,

1) Don't use a vacumm that has a spinning attatchment brush on it. This will create fuzz where there is none.

2) Don't use the damp cloth on the rails at all. Any water can make your rail rubber or cushion dry rot and crack in a short period of time. The rails are to be brushed and that's all that's required to keep them right.

3) Don't use a wet cloth. Damp, yes but wet, no. This can loosen up the cloth. Especially, when the cloth is soaked.

4) When using a damp cloth. Don't rub hard when wiping in the direction your going. Usually from headrail to footrail.

5) If you do use a spray like Windex or the Quick Clean spray used on the US Open tables. Don't brush it in. I recommend using the Quick Clean and the lambs wool squeegy in the direction noted.

6) Let dry before playing on the cloth. Don't forget that Simonis 860 cloth is very good about capturing the chalk and powder in the cloth and doesn't neccessary let it go through to the slate. A slight wipe down after use on a home table when done for the night is better than letting it build up over a week.

Good luck and this is my own humble opinion.

Regards,

C.C.~~ /ccboard/images/graemlins/grin.gif

PQQLK9
12-28-2004, 06:06 PM
You are preaching to the choir as I understand and agree with you completly. And BTW a most informative post.

Here is the link to my post. I simply wanted to show that people in the industry
sometimes refer to the cloth as felt.
http://www.ozonebilliards.com/pooltablefelt.html

Some old timers still refer to the rails as the "rag". Most certainly a holdover
term from when the rails were stuffed with rags.
/ccboard/images/graemlins/smile.gif

SPetty
12-28-2004, 07:07 PM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote PQQLK9:</font><hr> Some old timers still refer to the rails as the "rag". Most certainly a holdover term from when the rails were stuffed with rags. /ccboard/images/graemlins/smile.gif <hr /></blockquote>Are you sure you're not just making this up? I've never heard this in my several years hanging around this forum. I guess that's why I'm still here... /ccboard/images/graemlins/smile.gif

PQQLK9
12-28-2004, 07:17 PM
Early tables had wooden beds that warped. Cushions were stuffed with horsehair or rags, making for irregular, unresponsive play.
http://travelthenet.com/columns/clips/pool.htm

Willie Joplin uses that expression on his Ultimate One Pocket Tape
"Don't leave me on the rag"
/ccboard/images/graemlins/smile.gif

92corrado
12-28-2004, 07:34 PM
Haha, I just wasnt thinking... keep in mind I am also new to this pool thing. I just said felt cuz It just sounded right at the time. I do know it isnt felt, However like some of you mentioned, I have heard it refered to as 'felt' before. Thank you all for the feedback on my question!

PQQLK9
12-28-2004, 07:37 PM
I used to own a red 92 corrado. At 40 mph the rear spoiler would activate. /ccboard/images/graemlins/cool.gif

92corrado
12-28-2004, 07:43 PM
/ccboard/images/graemlins/shocked.gif /ccboard/images/graemlins/shocked.gif /ccboard/images/graemlins/shocked.gif Really? what are the chances! They are real nice... love mine to death. I got black with tan leather. /ccboard/images/graemlins/grin.gif

Perk
12-29-2004, 06:18 AM
Must come from the Co-Ed Naked Pool Shirt, Get Felt on the Table!

&lt;--actually could care less when someone says felt. EVERYONE knows what they are referring too, so it is an accepted term. /ccboard/images/graemlins/smile.gif

Deeman2
12-29-2004, 08:05 AM
K9,

I was not trying to embarrass anyone over the "felt" issue. We can call it anything we want. I was just pointing out that while it is often refered to as felt, it is not correct. No biggie here. I just saw the reference and pointed it out. I, too, remember the term "Rag" in reference to cushions. I even remember some that played like rags!

As we all know, there have been books written that use the term "felt" as in Green Felt Jungle so it an accepted term in some quarters. In part, at least, this is an educational forum so we sometimes deam words as important. If someone mis-identifies swerve as deflection, someone will point that out. Not that it will change a thing but most of us just tend to see words misused and naturally want to point out where they may not be correct. This may be anal retentive but may be somewhat effective in us using a common language. If someone tells me they re-felt tables for a living, they might be perfectly good at recovering tables. However, just the use of the term makes me a little curious at their level of knowledge. Maybe this is wrong. If, however, I ask them if they indeed use felt to do the job and they say "Yes", I might question their knowledge and skill at the job.

For some odd reason I have never liked the term "Combos" to refer to combinations shots (Combo is not a contraction of combination) and hate to hear people refer to caroms as combinations or combos. Kicks are not banks and stripes are still not bigguns and I know that won't change the world.

I'll try to be less ready to jump on these types of words in the future and we can all use looser terms with less critique from the word police.
/ccboard/images/graemlins/crazy.gif
Deeman

PQQLK9
12-29-2004, 08:18 AM
No problem here Deeman, I always enjoy your posts.

My pet peeve is "your" for you are /ccboard/images/graemlins/smile.gif

catscradle
12-30-2004, 06:06 AM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote PQQLK9:</font><hr> No problem here Deeman, I always enjoy your posts.

My pet peeve is "your" for you are /ccboard/images/graemlins/smile.gif <hr /></blockquote>

Do you mean you dislike people incorrectly contracting "you are" to "your" or that you dislike it even when it is contracted correctly to "you're"? Just curious for some reason.

PQQLK9
12-30-2004, 07:47 AM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote catscradle:</font><hr> <blockquote><font class="small">Quote PQQLK9:</font><hr> No problem here Deeman, I always enjoy your posts.

My pet peeve is "your" for you are /ccboard/images/graemlins/smile.gif <hr /></blockquote>

Do you mean you dislike people incorrectly contracting "you are" to "your" or that you dislike it even when it is contracted correctly to "you're"? Just curious for some reason.
<hr /></blockquote>
It's the "your" for you are. /ccboard/images/graemlins/smile.gif But what do I know, I was lousy at english.