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woody_968
12-28-2004, 10:05 AM
Below is a post I made on AZ where there have been several posts about changes do to lessons. I thought I would post it here and get your oppinions.

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With all of the recent threads about lessons and changes that make us uncomfortable I thought I would bring up a way to look at these changes that might help some of us.

When changing someones stance/grip/stroke/bridge one of the first comments made is "that is uncomfortable". May I suggest instead of saying its uncomfortable we learn to say "that feels different"? On the surface it looks like just a change of words, but in reality it can change your total mental outlook of the change.

Uncomfortable is negative. None of us like to feel uncomfortable and we will do everything in our power to stay away from this feeling.

Different can be positive, it tells you you are in a new position or using a new technique. That is EXACTLY what we should be looking for!!! If it feels the same as it always did we probably didnt change anything, but if it feels different (and we are doing as a qualified instructor suggested) then we are most likely on the right track to improve our game.

It doesnt take long for the new feeling to replace the old, so enjoy it while it lasts. If we really want to improve in this great game we have to get to where we LOVE it when something new feels different! Its these new and different feelings that, when incorportated into our game, will yeild the improvement we are all looking for.

Any other oppinions on how to deal with change?

Woody

Deeman2
12-28-2004, 10:26 AM
Woody,

I think it's all sematics anyway. I feel different a lot of times. I feel uncomfortable when shooting a shot I am not confident in and calling it "different" won't make me stroke any smoother/better, IMHO. If we call it uncomfortable, so what? It will become more confortable over time and, therefore, we can make a positive out of it in time.

I get a little sensitive over the implied importance of words in a visual/feel type game. Can any of us adequately describe the game in words? I don't think so.

If osima bin laden is chasing me with an AK-47, I feel I would probably feel uncomfortable and any renaming of it to a "different" word will not make me run any faster...

Deeman

woody_968
12-28-2004, 10:59 AM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote Deeman2:</font><hr>

If osima bin laden is chasing me with an AK-47, I feel I would probably feel uncomfortable and any renaming of it to a "different" word will not make me run any faster...

Deeman <hr /></blockquote>

If Osama was chasing you calling it different wouldnt make you run faster. Calling it uncomfortable wouldnt keep you from running away either. But with some people in pool when it is uncomfortable they simply wont do it.

One of the points I must not have gotten across is to concentrate on the feeling, because as you said, this is a feel game. And the hard thing about learning a feel game is we cant describe a feel, and if we do try to describe it we must do it in MANY different ways because what clicks for some people will mean nothing to others.

This post obviously will not help you in any way (not that you need it) but it may help someone, and thats the reason I bring it up.

Woody - always enjoys Deeman's straight to the point way of thinking.

Bob_Jewett
12-28-2004, 11:43 AM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote woody_968:</font><hr> Below is a post I made on AZ where there have been several posts about changes do to lessons. I thought I would post it here and get your [opinions]. ... <hr /></blockquote>
I think that pretty much everyone is reluctant to move out of their "comfort zone." Some -- the adventurous ones -- will sometimes try new methods or ideas, but most will want to stick with what they learned early on, and trying to get them to change anything in the way they do things is very hard.

An example of this is the players who never try any game but eight ball (or nine ball) because they are afraid they might ruin their game by playing a different one. Most players who think like that have no game to ruin, sadly.

Each different game offers its own important shots and a chance to better learn one or many aspects of pool that you may have overlooked in your "favorite" game because they aren't important as often. An example: at one pocket, you have to freeze the cue ball to a blocking ball for safety -- extreme speed accuracy is required. At nine ball, such precision would be nice, but you don't see most players either trying for or succeeding at perfect safety speed.

When was the last time you played on either a carom table or a snooker table? If the answer is never, you may want to look into breaking out of your cocoon. How many different pool games have you played in the last three months? At least three?

As far as dealing with change, I think some people simply can't. I was trying to show one student how to use a standard Pre-Shot Routine (PSR). Part of the routine is to take some warmup strokes and stop the stick with your tip nearly on the cue ball so you can check for where the tip will contact the cue ball. He refused to bring his tip within two inches of the cue ball. He wouldn't even edge up slowly to the cue ball. I could not convince him that it would be OK bring his tip closer to the ball before the power stroke. He wouldn't even try it once.

And then there is the often irrational attachment of many players to one very specific kind of cue stick.

Deeman2
12-28-2004, 11:55 AM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote woody_968:</font><hr> <blockquote><font class="small">Quote Deeman2:</font><hr>

If osima bin laden is chasing me with an AK-47, I feel I would probably feel uncomfortable and any renaming of it to a "different" word will not make me run any faster...

Deeman <hr /></blockquote>

If Osama was chasing you calling it different wouldnt make you run faster. Calling it uncomfortable wouldnt keep you from running away either. <font color="blue"> Very good point.</font color> But with some people in pool when it is uncomfortable they simply wont do it. <font color="blue"> You are right. My wife is an example. If I tell her to do this...she says, "That's not comfortable!" I say, "Then perhaps you are doing it right." </font color>

One of the points I must not have gotten across is to concentrate on the feeling, because as you said, this is a feel game. And the hard thing about learning a feel game is we cant describe a feel, and if we do try to describe it we must do it in MANY different ways because what clicks for some people will mean nothing to others. <font color="blue"> You are correct. I can get off track if I think rather than feel. </font color>

This post obviously will not help you in any way (not that you need it) but it may help someone, and thats the reason I bring it up. <font color="blue">Wrong, any post that makes me think, can help me. Your posts are always good, in particular. </font color>

Woody - always enjoys Deeman's straight to the point way of thinking. <hr /></blockquote> <font color="blue"> I like it anytime someone uses the word "straight" with my name. (Not that there's anything wrong with not being straight). Keep the liberals at bay!!! </font color>

Deeman