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cueball1950
01-03-2005, 10:58 PM
Just a quick note to ask. today i went from just talking glucophage 500mg 2 twice a day plus avandia 4 mg 1 twice a day to having to add a slow acting insukin injection at night. small dosage to start. only 10 units, with a great posibility of going up. My question is this. what side effects should i look for in the beginning or how long does a dose actually take to work. And since everybody on here knows that i travel to alot of tournaments, will it be safe to carry it in my car. better yet, will it be legal. Just don't want any trouble while traveling and get stopped and then do a car search and find the needles and stuff is all....any info would be greatly appreciated.......mike

CarolNYC
01-04-2005, 03:15 AM
Hey Mike,

[ QUOTE ]
what side effects should i look for in the beginning or how long does a dose actually take to work <hr /></blockquote>

Your physician should be able to answer these questions!

[ QUOTE ]
will it be safe to carry it in my car. better yet, will it be legal <hr /></blockquote>

Yep-you should be wearing some kind of "medical alert bracelet" !

Carol /ccboard/images/graemlins/wink.gif

Tom_In_Cincy
01-04-2005, 10:43 AM
Once you get your blood sugar reading under control, you should have more energy, less headaches, less cravings for food and drinks.

Traveling, you can store your insulin and supplies in a small cooler with just a small zip lock bag of a few ice cubes. This little package will stay cool for 24 hours.

My 21 year old son is type I (twice a day shots of insulin) and has been since he was 11. We've done lots of traveling over the years.

Keep a copy of your perscription handy for out of town emergencies. Have your doctor's telephone number or answering service on you at all times, when out of town. and also wear a 'Medical Alert' bracelet or necklace. This is one of the first things EMT's look for.

Rich R.
01-04-2005, 12:00 PM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote Tom_In_Cincy:</font><hr> My 21 year old son is type I (twice a day shots of insulin) and has been since he was 11. We've done lots of traveling over the years. <hr /></blockquote>
Tom, I don't mean to butt in, BUT, your son should talk to the doctor about one of the insulin pumps. I know several people with them and they all love them. The insulin levels stay much more stable. /ccboard/images/graemlins/grin.gif

Tom_In_Cincy
01-04-2005, 12:46 PM
Rich,

I don't know why you would think we haven't looked into pumps. Being diabetic means regular trips to the doctor for checkups (up to 4 times a year or more if you're ok, more if you're not)

Alternative insulin injection methods and testing have always been part of the discussions, as well as eating habits and exercise. Not every diabetic wants the pump, there are life styles that the pump adds restrictions. We also subscribe to multiple diabetic information services, to see the latest developments.

We keep daily and weekly records of all the blood testing results. My son learned how to use Microsoft's Excel spreadsheets to track his weight, calorie intake, blood sugar readings, times he ate and adjustments to insulin dosages. When we go to the doctor's office for a visit, all this info is presented for the dr to review. We also visit a diebetic nutrionist twice a year for updates and consutations.

Rich R.
01-05-2005, 05:01 AM
Tom, I didn't mean to imply that you and your son were not taking care of business. If it sounded like that, I am sorry.
Just, from my personal experience, I find that some people are not aware of the most common things. I was just making sure that you were aware of the pumps. It is amazing how many people, even diabetics, are not aware of their existence.
I have a friend who was involved in the early stages of testing the pumps, over 20 years ago. So I guess I just try to make sure everyone knows about them.
Of course, the bottom line, as far as using them, is the individual's choice.
Sorry I butted in.