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SnakebyteXX
01-07-2005, 07:23 AM
My home table was recently re-covered in Simonis 860. I was warned that the 860 cloth was susceptible to burn marks from the cue tip striking the cloth at high speed during the break.

In order to avoid burn marks while breaking I've been using a small piece of left-over Simonis as a platform for the cue ball. It works moderately well although frankly it's also kind of a pain in the butt.

Meanwhile, a visiting friend has suggested that the burn marks on the cloth are actually phenolic resin residue left by the cue ball travelling at very high speed when launched on the break. She cites the shrinkage that generally occurs with the cue ball over time (loss of weight due to constant wear and tear) as an indication that she's right.

I'm thinking that it's the tip of the cue that's the source of friction and that these white streaks are actually burn marks and not cue ball residue. But maybe it's a little of both?

Comments?

Snake

yegon
01-07-2005, 07:43 AM
The white spots are definitely caused by the cue ball (or any other bouncing balls). Just wait a bit and you will get a nice line showing the most commonly used path of the cue ball on the break. As the cue ball falls on the cloth after breaking it will create a line of white dots to the rack after time.

If those marks would be caused by a cue tip, there would be no spots just lines (if you do not break with your cue pointing directly down at the cloth in 90 degree angle).

I do not think the white color has anything to do with the whiteness of the cue ball. I think that the compressed material of the cloth that stays on the spot where the ball falls is simply of lighter color then the rest of the cloth because it's structure it organized differently after impact.

You can try it with a black 8 ball. Just let it fall several times on the table and you will get the same white spots. On very old and worn out cloth you cen even see the marks under every ball in the rack.

DavidMorris
01-07-2005, 08:16 AM
Yep, it's caused by the balls. A tip can make a mark on the cloth of you drive it into the cloth, but those can usually be cleaned up if you don't damage the cloth. The burn marks from the balls are pretty much permanent and cannot be cleaned AFAIK.

As long as the cloth is still in good shape, burn marks don't bother me much. I think they make a table look "seasoned." It is more common with certain table cloths, and I hear some people bashing Simonis for this reason alone. Which is silly to me, I'd much rather have the action of a quality cloth like Simonis than the nappy stuff on some tables.

Billy
01-07-2005, 11:37 AM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote SnakebyteXX:</font><hr> In order to avoid burn marks while breaking I've been using a small piece of left-over Simonis as a platform for the cue ball. It works moderately well although frankly it's also kind of a pain in the butt.

Snake



<hr /></blockquote>

it's the friction of the ball leaving its resting place.

try placing a dollar bill instead of a piece of cloth under the Q.

a thick piece of cloth under the cueball promotes flying the table on the break because of the heighth of the cloth is so much higher than the rack of balls

jmo

KGeeED
01-07-2005, 12:25 PM
It is like a tire skid mark. The cloth is getting a slight wear mark. As stated look down the track line and you will see areas where the cueball is hopping. You will also see a track line along the rail. This is caused by the ball rebounding off the rail. I use a piece of cloth under the cue when I break and it helps protect the cloth. As far as the ball bouncing because of the cloth it does not matter. The ball will bounce with or without the cloth. Take a quarter or half dollar and put it about 6 inches or so in front of the cueball when you break. The cueball will fly over it as if it wasn't there. Basically the cueball leaves the table on every shot.

SnakebyteXX
01-07-2005, 12:46 PM
Thanks to all for the explanation - it's much appreciated.

I'm wondering now if it's even worth the bother to use any kind of 'patch' to support the cue ball during the break?

If the streaking is inevitable, what's the good of using a patch?

Snake

jjinfla
01-07-2005, 01:00 PM
Are you sure you have 860 and not 760 cloth?

760 has more rayon, or is it nylon, than 860 and is more susceptible to the white marks.

You can call simonis, I believe that number is 1-800-simonis, and the person answering the phone can explain it to you.

We used to use the cloth pad on our tables where I live and gave up on them. Not worth the bother and didn't really see much difference. Tables are recovered once a year anyway.

Jake

Fred Agnir
01-07-2005, 01:11 PM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote SnakebyteXX:</font><hr>

I'm thinking that it's the tip of the cue that's the source of friction and that these white streaks are actually burn marks and not cue ball residue. But maybe it's a little of both?

Comments?

Snake



<hr /></blockquote>It's the Nylon in the cloth changing to white from the cueball friction. It's a burn mark, if you will.

Fred &lt;~~~ won't buy Simonis because of it

yegon
01-07-2005, 01:49 PM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote SnakebyteXX:</font><hr> Thanks to all for the explanation - it's much appreciated.

I'm wondering now if it's even worth the bother to use any kind of 'patch' to support the cue ball during the break?

If the streaking is inevitable, what's the good of using a patch?

Snake <hr /></blockquote>

if you break from the same spot most of the time you will destroy the cloth completely in that place making it through to the slate. So the extra piece of cloth under the cueball is not there to avoid the white spots but to avoid a big hole in the cloth. It is often used to train jump shots too for the same reason, to protect the cloth from severe damage.

JimS
01-08-2005, 06:26 AM
I use a patch of Simonis about 3" square so that a hole won't be made in my cloth. It's not much trouble.