PDA

View Full Version : Pause, Pause, Pause



c.holtz009
01-09-2005, 07:06 AM
I have heard a lot about incorporating a pause into one's stroke, so I thought why not give it a try.
It seems to me that the pause in the final backstroke helps to attain deadly focus on the contact point of the object ball.
Is this the reason for the pause?

HallofFame
01-09-2005, 07:56 AM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote c.holtz009:</font><hr> I have heard a lot about incorporating a pause into one's stroke, so I thought why not give it a try.
It seems to me that the pause in the final backstroke helps to attain deadly focus on the contact point of the object ball.
Is this the reason for the pause? <hr /></blockquote>

In a sense, yes.

Your brain cannot react fast enough to make changes if you do not pause. What I mean by this is if you stroke, stroke, stroke, HIT and you are a bit off in your aim you do not have time to adjust to correct the error.

I think Buddy Hall is a prime example of this, his pause on the final backstroke is lengthy.

Other examples would be to watch (in slow motion) some Accu-Stats videos of top players when they are aiming a difficult shot and watch their process; it is AIM, ADJUST, WARM UP STROKES, ADJUST, WARM UP STROKES, ADJUST, WARM UP STROKES, etc.until they are ready to "pull the trigger".

This pause can be very slight right up to the Buddy Hall example, but you certainly need to pause.

You might run into a player, maybe 1 out of 50, that slides by without a pause; BUT, don't confuse not pausing with "yipping" (rushing) your stroke; just because you see a top player NOT pause does not mean he/she does it all the time. When shots are difficult it is a natural tendency to get the shot over with because you do not want to deal with it; hence, ALL world class players "yip" their stroke occasionally.

HOF

Cane
01-09-2005, 08:49 AM
I have a relatively long pause at the back of my stroke... not as long as Buddy's, but pretty long. Mine is about a second.

Here are my reasons for the pause... if you try to make a continuous stroke, in the first place, it just isn't possible. In order for your arm to change directions, it must stop at some point. You can't make a "continuous" stroke. Whether they realize it or not, everyone has some kind of pause at the end of their backstroke... may not be long enough of one for them, but they do have one. Since you have one anyways, why not make it long enough to give your brain that short time it needs to process the info necessary to make the shot.

Second reason.... Focus on the target. After I've made my aim adjustments and warmup strokes, I set on the cue ball, about a second before I move my eyes to the OB, then I start my back stroke. I make my back stroke and hold it for about a second. My backstroke is slow and smooth, so it takes up about a second of time. My entire stroke from the time I make my final set on the cue ball (cue at rest after warm up strokes and adjustments), is about 3 seconds long.

It takes your brain about 2 seconds to focus your eyes on an object or a point. So, at least in my opinion, you need to be focused on the target for 2 seconds before you strike the cue ball.

By the way, if you'll watch Buddy play, the reason his pause is so long is that he doesn't look up to the target until he starts his backstroke. When the cue starts to move back, his eyes move up to the target. I tried that... didn't work for me, but works great for him!!!

Later,
Bob

CarolNYC
01-09-2005, 09:20 AM
[ QUOTE ]
It takes your brain about 2 seconds to focus your eyes on an object or a point. So, at least in my opinion, you need to be focused on the target for 2 seconds before you strike the cue ball. <hr /></blockquote>

Yep!
Also, it gives your arm muscles a chance to adjust!
Carol /ccboard/images/graemlins/wink.gif

ChuckR
01-09-2005, 09:35 AM
I've always felt that a pause gave me much more accuracy and purity of hit. I first noticed this when I would hit a draw shot with a pause and noticed that the draw was much greater than when I would rush my stroke. It also establishes a stronger sense of timing and rythym. Remember that you don't drive a nail deeper by taking the hammer up quicker.

Popcorn
01-09-2005, 10:31 AM
I pause twice, both with the tip at the cue ball and then just for fraction of a second on the back stroke.

Vapros
01-09-2005, 10:58 AM
I have always believed that your stroke actually begins there, at the end of your back stroke or take-away. Up to that point everything else is for aiming and warming up and getting into position to make your stroke. Those things are part of your routine, but I don't think they are part of your stroke.

randyg
01-09-2005, 12:00 PM
All pool players have to "Pause" at the back of their stroke!

The good pool players do it with control......SPF-randyg

JimS
01-09-2005, 06:58 PM
As RandyG said, paraphrased....everybody pauses; you have to pause even if it's not noticeable the transition between back swing and forward stroke has to include a stop, however brief, from back to forward movement.

I don't care why people prolong the pause. I've tried it, it works, so I do it. Why doesn't matter to me. If it works it works.

GeraldG
01-09-2005, 08:28 PM
That's one of the things I work on in practice, to make myself pause for a second before the stroke. It helps tremendously.

recoveryjones
01-09-2005, 11:08 PM
Tim White (billiard Sanctuary) mentions the importance of the pause on his instructional DVD's. He says that we basically pull the cue back with the tricep and then pause and bring it forward with the bicep.We're not talking weight lifting here because he advocates being very light on the cue, however, by pausing you give a chance for the muscles to shift from the tricep to the bicep with out them fighting against one another.The pause on the last stroke ensures that the tricep/bicep conflict will never happen.By pausing you can also focus extra long on the all important contact point on the object ball. RJ

Sid_Vicious
01-10-2005, 04:17 AM
Observe the snooker players we've gotten in the 9-ball tour here in the states, and you'll be assured that the pause is a good thing. As others have said, there HAS to be a pause from back-to-forward, you'd hurt yourself by trying to totally eliminate it, why not use it for gain...sid

pooltchr
01-10-2005, 05:47 AM
What Tim is saying is very true. The triceps are used for the backstroke movement, the biceps for the forward motion. You don't want both muscle groups trying to work at the same time or you get a conflice.

When you back your car out of the driveway, think about what happens if you put it in drive before you have completely stopped moving backward. It doesn't give you a very smooth start. Same principle with your stroke. If you want a smooth stroke, wait until the backward movement has stopped completely before you start moving forward.
Steve