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View Full Version : Ambience At Home During Practice Q



Sid_Vicious
01-10-2005, 06:31 AM
I was an early riser this AM, and hit the table simply throwing balls out and stringing runs, dead silence in the house, and I wondered, "Would it be better to run at least the TV for background chatter, somewhat like you'll find in the PH?" If I'd doing drills I would have understood that silence or personal mood music would be of benefit, but doing the 9-ball runs caused me ask whether it is wiser to create some kind of clutter in sound to make you work your concentration...sid

ChuckR
01-10-2005, 06:48 AM
I am amazed in what golfers insist on when they hit a golf shot and what pool players endure. I am able to step my game up when I practice in silence and am more easily "sharked" when distracted with conversations, comments about the shot, terrible music and the likes. Perhaps this just points out my inability to totally focus and blank out all distractions. It seems like they always come on the most critical shots.

"It's not where your at, it's where your headed".

Williebetmore
01-10-2005, 07:40 AM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote Sid_Vicious:</font><hr> "Would it be better to run at least the TV for background chatter, somewhat like you'll find in the PH?" <hr /></blockquote>

Sid,
YES!! I wouldn't even think about hitting balls without throwing on some Jethro Tull first - how else can you get in the mood?

cheesemouse
01-10-2005, 09:34 AM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote ChuckR:</font><hr> I am amazed in what golfers insist on when they hit a golf shot and what pool players endure. I am able to step my game up when I practice in silence and am more easily "sharked" when distracted with conversations, comments about the shot, terrible music and the likes. Perhaps this just points out my inability to totally focus and blank out all distractions. It seems like they always come on the most critical shots.

"It's not where your at, it's where your headed". <hr /></blockquote>


Having started playing pool with my idiot buddies( 14 years old) jumping around and screaming directly in front of all my shots I now don't find 'blocking out' during pool play any problem at all. Pool is one game where sterile conditions rarely exist even under the best conditions. You can create any conditions you like in your homeroom but don't expect these conditions anywhere else and for sure don't expect too control the conditions you play under outside your private little bubble...dealing with distractions is just part of the game, no excuses. If you don't have the personal armor that deals with outside distractions no one will feel sorry for you...as a matter of fact they will use it against you.

How would you like to drop down on a tough nine ball cut shot to the corner to win the US Open and see nothing but the camera man wobbling around directly behind to pocket? Who's going to listen to your excuse if you miss? You better not see the camera man...IMHO using 'I was sharked' as an excuse for losing makes you just another loser.

Nothing personal intended. I don't know you and you don't know me but I know one thing for sure. "I love to play distracted players"... /ccboard/images/graemlins/grin.gif

I play golf with numerious guys who don't play any pool and I figure that alone is worth two a side... /ccboard/images/graemlins/tongue.gif /ccboard/images/graemlins/tongue.gif

eg8r
01-10-2005, 11:48 AM
Does all the music and clutter bother you when you are at the pool hall? Me personally, I don't really pay attention to it all when I am playing so it has not affected me either way.

eg8r

Popcorn
01-10-2005, 01:19 PM
I would say no, even though you won't be playing under such ideal conditions at the pool room you are training your mind and muscle memory and it works best in a quiet setting. I always practice in a quiet room with maybe some music, yet I have no problem playing in complete chaos when I have to. The training is what counts, trying to replicate noisy conditions I don't think help you improve the technical part or subconscious part of your game.

Popcorn
01-10-2005, 01:27 PM
Distractions when you practice will just inhibit your practice and improvement. The best defense against distractions when you are competing is good play and you achieve that from proper practice. When you are in stroke things don't bother you. Things begin to bother you when you begin to play bad so you go looking for excuses. point being, good solid well practiced play will over come any distractions.

Cane
01-10-2005, 01:39 PM
I agree with Popcorn. I practice in complete quiet, no background noise. I just figure it helps me concentrate on whatever it is I'm working on at the time.

Now, one of the weekly tournaments I play in is in a bar that has Karaoke going on at the same time of the tournament. Even though, when I'm not in a match, it sounds like a herd of calves dying in a hail storm, the "racket" doesn't distract me in the least, because the silent practice helps train me to concentrate on the shot at hand, and not listen to outside noise. When I'm not in the match, the Karaoke gives us all something to laugh about and get our mind out of the game for a few minutes!

Later,
Bob

Sid_Vicious
01-10-2005, 02:25 PM
What it does or not do is as much subconscious as anything, but I'll quickly state without hesitation that I play much better anytime I have nothing on the jukebox and few if any players chattering and cutting up...sid

SecaucusFats
01-10-2005, 03:37 PM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote Popcorn:</font><hr> I would say no, even though you won't be playing under such ideal conditions at the pool room you are training your mind and muscle memory and it works best in a quiet setting. I always practice in a quiet room with maybe some music, yet I have no problem playing in complete chaos when I have to. The training is what counts, trying to replicate noisy conditions I don't think help you improve the technical part or subconscious part of your game. <hr /></blockquote>

I agree with you 100%. A quiet environment does make for better practice. IMO the whole point of practice is to develop and internalize all the skills one will need in competition, peace and quiet help facilitate that process. Having said that, once I'm actually playing..the juke box can be blaring, people can be talking, all kinds of hell can be going on, and it really doesn't affect me.

SF

recoveryjones
01-10-2005, 09:35 PM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote Sid_Vicious:</font><hr> I was an early riser this AM, and hit the table simply throwing balls out and stringing runs, dead silence in the house, and I wondered, "Would it be better to run at least the TV for background chatter, somewhat like you'll find in the PH?" If I'd doing drills I would have understood that silence or personal mood music would be of benefit, but doing the 9-ball runs caused me ask whether it is wiser to create some kind of clutter in sound to make you work your concentration...sid <hr /></blockquote>

When you are practising in silence the sound of your cue tip hitting the ball and the ball hitting the pocket is excellent feedback.When I hit it good, I just love that sound.

Some billiard instructors (Jimmy Reid, the Monk) want you to feed your subconscious with the sounds of a really good hit.Jimmy Reid even asks you to hear the hit even before you pull the trigger.By programming your mind with those sweet sounds, you will be able to call upon your subconscious to produce the same sound when it counts, even though it may be drowned out by some pool hall that plays it's music much to loud.

I believe if you practice in a quiet setting your subconcious will be able to absorb so much more info as distractions are not an issue. You will naturally be able to adapt to noiser pool hall settings as you go there time and time again and get acclimitized.Structured practice is an educational learning process and my reccomendation is to practice in peace.RJ

Sid_Vicious
01-11-2005, 06:49 AM
If I were a blind man I'd still know a good stroke when I heard it. Funny how these things have seemingly all popped into my head over the years of practicing alone, and now some even make good sense. Thanks...sid