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sack316
01-11-2005, 02:14 PM
thankfully my draw stroke is reaching a comfortable level now (I was always weary to use a strong draw because I did it wrong). But now that it's coming about I noticed that I actually loosen my back hand as I stroke. I think it's something I started doing unconciously to compensate for the way I would poke or stab at it trying to draw hard before. Is the way I am doing it now acceptable, or might I be starting a new bad habit? Like I said, it's working well right now... but I don't want to develop any more holes than I already have if I am in fact doing something wrong.

randyg
01-11-2005, 02:23 PM
Have you worked under a BCA Instructor? Do you have video equipment at home, or just a mirror??SPF-randyg

Deeman2
01-11-2005, 02:41 PM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote sack316:</font><hr> thankfully my draw stroke is reaching a comfortable level now (I was always weary to use a strong draw because I did it wrong). But now that it's coming about I noticed that I actually loosen my back hand <font color="blue"> This is the key to a good stroke </font color> as I stroke. I think it's something I started doing unconciously to compensate for the way I would poke or stab at it trying to draw hard before. Is the way I am doing it now acceptable, <font color="blue"> Yes, but as Randy said, you might benefit from some instruction. Scott Lee is still not barred from Alabama yet, so you might set up a session with him. There is not better cure than a good instructor watching and critiquing your stroke. </font color> or might I be starting a new bad habit? Like I said, it's working well right now... but I don't want to develop any more holes than I already have if I am in fact doing something wrong. <hr /></blockquote>

<font color="blue"> Sack, a loose grip is the indicator I use as well as that feeling that I'm accellerating through the shot (I know, it's not possible but it's the feel anyway to me). </font color>

Deeman
feels the most valuable accessory you can own is a good instructor's phone number...

sack316
01-11-2005, 11:01 PM
thanks for the input. No, I haven't had the benefit of a real instructor as of yet. I would love to have something like that to hopefully pull me up to another level.
Tonight the stroke was there all night... probably shot as well as I ever have in my life. A few break and runs, and some great outs. Everything just flowed so smooth and seemed so easy (or perhaps natural is a better word). I'd love to have nights like tonight on a regular basis, and I think y'all hit it right on the head that maybe an instructor could do just that. To fill me in on what's good and bad in my game right now. Scott, if you're ever round here let me know, it'd be an honor to learn from you. I hear so many great things on this board!

Rod
01-11-2005, 11:18 PM
Keep doing it, it's a far sight better than what I normally see. Keep er loose and oiled up. LOL You may not be doing everything perfect but your off to a good start. It is prefered to start loose and stay there but that comes in time. Tension creates all sorts of bad habits. Lack of tension = Good.

Rod

pooltchr
01-12-2005, 05:35 AM
I don't know haw far you are from Atlanta, but I am down there several times a year with the Fury 9-ball tour. If you could catch me there, I would be glad to spend some time with you and see if there is anything I can spot to help your draw shots. My next Georgia stop is the last Saturday of January at Mr. Cue's II if you would like to try to get together. You can see the Georgia tour schedule on my web site www.s-sbilliards.com (http://www.s-sbilliards.com)
Steve

PQQLK9
01-12-2005, 09:19 AM
I can personally vouch for your teaching abilities, plus anyone who can strecth out one game of one pocket to 2 1/2 hrs is OK with me. /ccboard/images/graemlins/smile.gif
I'm looking forward to our next game.

sack316
01-12-2005, 11:45 AM
hey thanks pooltchr! Transportation is a mojor problem right now, but if I can find a buddy that may want some help too (I have a perfect one in mind) maybe he and I can take a trip to come see ya sometime this month. He and I are getting ready for regionals, so the timing would be great. Thanks again, and once I talk to him and look at your schedule I'll try to PM you.

pooltchr
01-13-2005, 06:15 AM
Nick, Thanks for the vote of confidence. I enjoyed that marathon as well. How we managed to get half the rack into 6 square inches at a pocket on the wrong end of the table is beyond me!
I'm in Raleigh this weekend kicking off the new Fury tour season, but should be back in the Green Room next weekend. Maybe we can try for a slightly shorter game or two next time.
Later, my friend.
Steve

141and3c
01-13-2005, 09:32 PM
The method I've used for 45 years is this: The forward stroke must be very quick, but the back stroke must be FASTER. It's called "snap back" in some books. This is because of friction from your cue tip remaining against the cue ball for a milisecond at the end of the stroke. You must back stroke even faster to prevent the friction from taking away the draw/backspin you just put on the cueball.
Here's a developing test shot: Place object ball in center of table. Cue ball on center head string. Shoot straight at object ball and try to draw cue ball back to head rail before the object ball goes down table and comes back to the head end. Sometimes you can beat it back with a hard stroke, and sometimes with a well controlled slower stroke.

Rod
01-13-2005, 10:02 PM
You learned this after 45 years? Snap back huh?

Rod

PQQLK9
01-13-2005, 10:14 PM
/ccboard/images/graemlins/smile.gif

GeraldG
01-14-2005, 02:22 AM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote 141and3c:</font><hr> The method I've used for 45 years is this: The forward stroke must be very quick, but the back stroke must be FASTER. It's called "snap back" in some books. This is because of friction from your cue tip remaining against the cue ball for a milisecond at the end of the stroke. You must back stroke even faster to prevent the friction from taking away the draw/backspin you just put on the cueball.
Here's a developing test shot: Place object ball in center of table. Cue ball on center head string. Shoot straight at object ball and try to draw cue ball back to head rail before the object ball goes down table and comes back to the head end. Sometimes you can beat it back with a hard stroke, and sometimes with a well controlled slower stroke. <hr /></blockquote>

If it works for you, cool....

I've always gotten the best draw and control from a smooth, controlled stroke and good follow-through and keeping the cue as level as possible. I seldom ever have to use a harder hit for good draw unless the cue ball is a distance from the object ball and I need the cueball to be sliding for a further distance. In that case, the follow-through is even more critical. I can easily draw the cueball the length of the table or more on most tables, depending on the condition of the balls, cloth, etc.

pooltchr
01-14-2005, 05:40 AM
If it works for you, that's fine. I would personally find it hard to control the amount of draw with the stroke you are describing. By reversing the direction of the cue, you have to be slowing down rather that accellerating when you make contact with the cue ball.
By following through and finishing your stroke, you can focus on stroke speed and tip placement on the cue ball, which allows you to control the distance you draw the cue ball back.
After 45 years, this might well work for you. I would have a hard time trying to teach it to any of my students.
I suspect most of Scott's or Randy's students have been shown the same thing.
I'm not saying you are wrong, no more than I would say Keith's sidestroke is wrong. But I wouldn't recommend his stroke to anyone else either.
Steve

JimS
01-14-2005, 06:44 AM
Well I"ll be darned. /ccboard/images/graemlins/tongue.gif /ccboard/images/graemlins/shocked.gif /ccboard/images/graemlins/wink.gif