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superstroke
01-16-2005, 11:00 PM
I've been doing this for awhile with good results by wipping it on with a rag and then off with the dry part of the rag. Does anyone know if this is bad for my shaft in the long term.

Rod
01-16-2005, 11:02 PM
People, including me have done it for years, no problem.

Rod

Paul_Mon
01-17-2005, 03:06 AM
Rubbing alcohol comes in different percentages; 70%, 80% and 90%. I believe that means how much water is left. I would buy the 90% stuff untill I found out about denatured alcohol. Which I believe has all the water removed, get it at Home Depot. I any case they are all probably suitable for use. My thinking was to get the one with the least amount of water. I also found some acetone moistened pads at work that were being discarded and keep a few of those in my case.

Paul Mon

yegon
01-17-2005, 06:15 AM
Denatured alcohol (at least here in Europe) has petrol added so that people can not drink it. It has something to do with the fact that pure alcohol has bigger consumer taxes added and is therefore too expensive for technical purposes. I do not think it has less water left. The purest alcohol there is (not lab grade but the one you can actually buy in a shop) has about 96%.

jjinfla
01-17-2005, 06:24 AM
I use a little bit of dishwashing soap to clean it up. And then I use car wax on it.

Jake

Paul_Mon
01-17-2005, 06:57 AM
I found a MSDS safety sheet that lists denatured alcoholas follows:

Ethyl alcohol 82.9
Ethyl acetate 0.2
Methyl alcohol 16.4
Methyl ethyl ketone 0.5 000078933 200 ppm Flammable

yegon
01-17-2005, 07:20 AM
that seems to be different from what is used here, but basically the methyl alcohol makes it undrinkable too

BLACKHEART
01-17-2005, 07:40 AM
/ccboard/images/graemlins/confused.gif PAUL, read the label of your DENATURED ALCOHOL can. Besides being HIGHLY flamable, the lable reads, "THIS PRODUCT CONTAINS CHEMICALS KNOWN TO THE STATE OF CALIFORIA TO CAUSE CANCER AND BIRTH DEFECTS OR OTHER REPRODUCTIVE HARM". Acetone is another know chemical, that causes cancer....JER

Cueless Joey
01-17-2005, 08:11 AM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote BLACKHEART:</font><hr> /ccboard/images/graemlins/confused.gif PAUL, read the label of your DENATURED ALCOHOL can. Besides being HIGHLY flamable, the lable reads, "THIS PRODUCT CONTAINS CHEMICALS KNOWN TO THE STATE OF CALIFORIA TO CAUSE CANCER AND BIRTH DEFECTS OR OTHER REPRODUCTIVE HARM". Acetone is another know chemical, that causes cancer....JER <hr /></blockquote>
What do you use instead Jer?
Thnx

Paul_Mon
01-17-2005, 08:33 AM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote BLACKHEART:</font><hr> /ccboard/images/graemlins/confused.gif PAUL, read the label of your DENATURED ALCOHOL can. Besides being HIGHLY flamable, the lable reads, "THIS PRODUCT CONTAINS CHEMICALS KNOWN TO THE STATE OF CALIFORIA TO CAUSE CANCER AND BIRTH DEFECTS OR OTHER REPRODUCTIVE HARM". Acetone is another know chemical, that causes cancer....JER <hr /></blockquote>

Your right Jer. Anyone using this stuff should make sure that the area is ventilated properly, wears gloves and eye protection, beware of sources of combustion (pilot lights, sparks, etc.). Many products readily available at the hardware store are known carcinogens and must be used correctly.

regards......Paul

DavidMorris
01-17-2005, 09:01 AM
FYI, you can also buy 99% Isopropyl alcohol. Ordinary medical Isopropyl "rubbing" alcohol (like the 70% Isopropyl you buy in the grocery store or pharmacy) has moisturizers added to help prevent over-drying of the skin. If you try to clean glass or other highly polished surface with ordinary alcohol you'll notice the slight whitish film it leaves behind -- this is residue from the moisturizers. 99% Isopropyl is commonly used for cleaning electrical components and things where you want as little residue as possible.

Not sure if/how the residue would make any difference on a wood shaft, though. If the moisturizer actually caused the wood to retain moisture, that would be bad I suppose. 99% Isopropyl should evaporate cleanly.

I've never used alcohol on my shafts though. The only thing I've used to clean shafts were paper towels, scotch pads, and just recently the Magic Eraser (which is probably the only thing I'll ever use from now on).

SpiderMan
01-17-2005, 09:02 AM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote superstroke:</font><hr> I've been doing this for awhile with good results by wipping it on with a rag and then off with the dry part of the rag. Does anyone know if this is bad for my shaft in the long term. <hr /></blockquote>

Don't know, but I'll bet it burns like the devil in the short term /ccboard/images/graemlins/grin.gif

All kidding aside, I've been using 90% isopropyl many years for surface cleaning. I use it instead of water because it removes scum better, and it dries faster.

SpiderMan

Cane
01-17-2005, 10:38 AM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote DavidMorris:</font><hr> FYI, you can also buy 99% Isopropyl alcohol. <hr /></blockquote>

Another alternative is hit Tobacco Shop that specializes in Pipe Tobaccos. Many of them carry pure Methanol. Nothing added, just pure methanol. Many old pipe lighters used methanol instead of naptha for lighter fluid. A pint of methanol will last forever... whether it's for pipe lighters or cleaning shafts.

Later,
Bob (who is smoking his pipe again trying to wean himself off of the Marlboros)

BLACKHEART
01-17-2005, 11:57 AM
/ccboard/images/graemlins/smile.gifI clean a dozen shafts a week useing AJAX kitchen clenser with bleach. I LIGHTLY sand the shaft,to break up the sealer, that body oils &amp; dirt form on the surface. Then with a dampened, folded paper towel &amp; AJAX, I work with the grain, starting at the ferrule. I work on 6" at a time. Then useing a clean spot on the towel, clean away the Ajax residue. After the whole shaft is cleaned, I spin the shaft in the lathe &amp; use a DRY paper towel, lightly at 1st, then with more pressure. The friction will create heat &amp; dry any moisture from the shaft. Then I sand smooth with 600 grit sandpaper,then 1000,&amp; finally 1500. The secret, is raising the grain between sandings, useing YAK SHAFT PREP. Burnish,useing a piece of leather. Finally I apply CUE SILK &amp; burnish again. If I'm shipping a Q, I'll protect it from the elliments, useing a sealer made from thinned(6-1) clear shellac, applied BEFORE the CUE SILK. I've been useing YAK PREP for several years &amp; love it. They make a shaft sealer that I intend to try soon. Does this help????????...JER

Popcorn
01-17-2005, 12:06 PM
I think you have to consider what you are trying to remove when you choose what to use as a cleaner. In regards to a cue shaft a quick buffing with a slightly damp cloth will do the trick most of the time. You may not want to be removing the deeply built up hand oils that give the nice patina to the wood. I personally don't like new white shafts, I think shafts get better with age and even looks better with a little warm tone to the color. If you get some really bad stuff on the shaft like you may get from the pockets on some tables where your shaft looks like it has been written on with a crayon you have to do a little more aggressive cleaning but in general over cleaning a shaft is not good in my opinion. Some players are a little obsessive about it. You just want the shaft to glide smooth yet have the cue retain it's character as far as it's looks go. Either way I would feel apprehensive having people using anything that can be harmful, you are just cleaning a cue shaft, not an engine.

Popcorn
01-17-2005, 12:16 PM
I use a little wax also on my own cue shaft. I like to feel the shaft and not have it over slick where I lose the feel of the cue.

Cueless Joey
01-17-2005, 12:18 PM
Thanx Jer.

Sid_Vicious
01-17-2005, 12:33 PM
I'd burnish with leather afterwards and still use it. Burnishing pulls the water out...sid~~~used to be picky and then chilled about most of it

JimS
01-18-2005, 05:40 AM
Thanks Jer.