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View Full Version : Killer Instinct, Who Else Feels None?



Sid_Vicious
01-17-2005, 01:28 PM
There are two contradicting camps in this sport IMO, those who play with heart for the win when down to an obvious win looming, and then there are graduations of people who play for fun, a desire to win(desire an operative word)but without the killer instinct. I see players getting to the money/winning ball who simply coast, or surprisingly, invent a way to toss the game back to the opponent. Much has to to with winning nerves I kinow, but there's also the factor of a pure drive to kill off the player for the win, and they usually do just that. I'm not forgetting the purist who plays just for his own self accomplishments as a third category mind you, but out of the first two, many of us lack that mindset to nail the other player down with sinking the cash ball.

I imagine ahead of time that most who will respond will be the "killers" since nobody likes droppine their drawers about their weak side, so I'll be the first to admit, I'm no killer, but will have to begin to work on it. What are you?

Sid

catscradle
01-17-2005, 02:02 PM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote Sid_Vicious:</font><hr> ... so I'll be the first to admit, I'm no killer, but will have to begin to work on it. What are you?

Sid <hr /></blockquote>

I don't really have a killer instinct, though I surely do like to win and it bums me out when I lose. I have killer instinct in more active sports where the adreneline of the battle takes over, but pool there is just too much downtime for me to get my competitive juices flowing. I'll damn near kill on the soccer field, but pool just seems too passive to get excited, no mano on mano.

Popcorn
01-17-2005, 02:14 PM
I don't know about a killer instinct but your opponent can sense when you are an all business guy, call that what you will, it has a definite effect on some people and can aid you in winning. It can be little more then just being quiet and playing without emotion that makes you seem so threatening. They are waiting to see you react if they break and run a few rack, when you don't it bothers them.

GeraldG
01-17-2005, 02:33 PM
As I stated in the other thread, this was a problem that I had and have been working hard on. I had the tendency to just "coast" when I felt I had the upper hand. It cost me a lot of matches. Now I make it point to go in for the kill. I start my game with that mindset.

dg-in-centralpa
01-17-2005, 02:50 PM
It depends on whom I'm playing. If I play someone at my speed or better, I definitely have a killer instinct. But if it's someone less than me, I sometimes will play at their level and fool around and sometimes end up losing. I'm working on this, but it ain't always easy.

DG

Tom_In_Cincy
01-17-2005, 03:10 PM
Sid,
If you play each shot as a step closer to the WIN, is that what you call 'killer instinct'? If so, then I must be guilty.

In tournament play, I HATE to lose. I play to win the 1st game and then the 2nd and so on until it is over.

I don't really know if this is what I would call 'killer instinct', but if it fits your definition, so be it.

I like to call it a Wining Attitude. When you've proved to yourself that you can win, it does come easier, more confidence and more 'trust' in what you do at the table. But, this also has to be assisted with a very strong 'acceptance' of the results of your efforts. No emotion until it is over.

The old saying, "act as if you've already been there" goes along way in your 'presence' and 'attitude and execution' at the table.

IMO

tateuts
01-17-2005, 04:25 PM
I probably have the least amount of killer instinct of any guy I know. I am very competitive and I want to win, but my instinct conflicts with that. My mental midset is more "defend' than "attack". I suspect that is the case with most of us.

For example, a few weeks ago a guy comes in and wants to play for money. I had no line on him, I'd never seen him before, and I was pretty sure he had no line on me. We start playing $50 a set 9 ball, he loses a few and wants to play for $100. I agreed and I kept on winning - there was no set I was behind even once. He paid up a few times. Soon it becomes obvious this is a mismatch and every time this guy loses his young buddies have to run over to the ATM machine. Just because of habit I wait for them to get money and get paid before taking the next shot, so those were tense moments.

So I won a few more and I expected him to quit. He just wanted to keep going. Then he wants to raise the stakes to $200. I finally said "no". The last set was 7 to 2 and he had no chance and I was getting no enjoyment out of this. Then he quit.

Later on I found out he was a snooker player from SFO and a gambler. I just was getting no enjoyment from taking his money anymore. I think someone with killer instinct would have gone for the jugular.

Chris

Sid_Vicious
01-17-2005, 05:02 PM
What I am talking about is when you are racing for the cash gambling, and it seems to me that the regular gamblers seem to smell the cash and complete their runs unlike the another segment of players who, even though they are equal or better in talent, find a way to get out of line or even miss dead in shots on the money ball while on the hill. The money players who remain successful nearly always make the finish, and yet these same players can lose like the rest of us in a nightly DBL elimination tournament. There's got to be something to that difference, and "killer" seemed like a good word for it. I know that nerves shakes the lesser or less seasoned money player, that's a given, but those who rake in cash instead of coughing up X-mas gifts seemingly takes on a fever for getting out when it's there staring them in the face. Are these players that much better, no, in some cases they are weaker overall...sid

tateuts
01-17-2005, 08:09 PM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote Sid_Vicious:</font><hr> What I am talking about is when you are racing for the cash gambling, and it seems to me that the regular gamblers seem to smell the cash and complete their runs unlike the another segment of players who, even though they are equal or better in talent, find a way to get out of line or even miss dead in shots on the money ball while on the hill. The money players who remain successful nearly always make the finish... <hr /></blockquote>

Sid,

With all else being equal, I think the more experienced money players are better at playing for money. I think nerves have a lot to do with it. The player who "once in a while" puts something on a game is going to be at a disadvantage against an equally skilled player who is constantly in action.

Sometimes it is our weakness that spurs on our opponents "killer instinct". This makes a big difference when the players are evenly matched. All it takes is for someone to blink and the momentum shifts.

Chris

BLACKHEART
01-17-2005, 09:21 PM
/ccboard/images/graemlins/smile.gifI played a guy last week in 8 ball league play, he's a very good player. I had several weeks of lackluster play &amp; had not been able to close out a match. In the 1st game he broke &amp; ran 5 balls &amp; missed. I ran out. I broke, made a ball &amp; had to play safe. He missed his 1st shot &amp; I saw him throw the chalk at the wall.I ran out &amp; from then on I KNEW I HAD HIM. I knew, because I recognized that he had given up, like I had the 2 weeks before. My confidence level comes &amp; goes, so I certainly know your feeling...JER

mksmith713
01-17-2005, 09:46 PM
Yeah, it's easy to tell when you're in the drivers seat.
Bad attitude is a dead give away.
What's even better is when you're playing someone who's much better than you and you get a few unexpected good breaks.
That drives better players nuts.

mksmith713
01-17-2005, 09:50 PM
Back to the post.
I'm from the camp that plays against myself.
I am my opponent.
Trying to play the best I can no matter who I play.
Very little impresses me.
I never play for money with the exception of prize money from a tournament.
Never one on one games for cash.
When no cash is involved, I can concentrate on my game and not worry about whether I can cover the bet.
Besides, what's the worst that can happen whenh you play for fun?
You might lose.... So what. I'll get em next time.

Rod
01-17-2005, 09:52 PM
Money players are driven, they have a goal, get the cash. While some players play for money they don't necesarily share the same goal.

Some just want to play for money but in a friendly atmosphere where no one gets hurt. This is not a money player, rather someone passing time. Betting money is just a way to make it more interesting. Money players treat it like a business, passing time isn't the intent, making money is.


Where I use to hang out I'd see it all the time. Guys and some gals gambled but the games were a joke. Players seemed to take more interest in conversation, playing the juke box, answer a cell phone, instead of staying focused on a game. Then they whine and get mad when they loose. You got all the rolls, blah blah blah. Hell I should have after listening to all that crap!! I should have won an award of some sort.

In almost every case, these players have improved only slightly in several years. Many of them never practice, playing is their way of practice. Don't fool yourself by thinking some of these other players are better or should win. Yes they may play good but a money player detects many things the average ( player that gambles) doesn't which includes but not limited to weakness in their game. You can learn a lot just watching people.

In the end a good money player finds a way to win.

Rod

Tom_In_Cincy
01-17-2005, 10:00 PM
Sid,
OK, I agree that the seasoned players can become more focused and play at their 'speed' for the cash.

If a player can "get out when they are suppose to get out", if that is similar to the 'killer instinct', then I agree about your observation.

I think there is a certain level of player, that is close to the 'being able to get out, when they are suppose to' but fail because of their lack of experience and not trusting their game.

recoveryjones
01-17-2005, 10:36 PM
I recently stepped up and committed myself to play nothing but A level players and higher. I've been told to play the best players and your game will improve by doing so.I think my success rate is only about 35-40% against these guys however, it could easily be 50% if I had some killer instinct and a little more heart.

Part of me has found some satisfaction that I can compete and give these guys a really good match.Some of my loses have been hill-hill heartbreakers. I need to move up to the next level and learn to close out these tight matches.

Part of me thinks that I've got their respect by giving them a real tight match.Another part of me says that they don't respect me at all and never will until I'm the one winning 60-65%, while they are the ones only winning 35-40%.

Being respectful competition has satisfied my appetite for a season. Now I need to know how to learn to close the deal and become a killer. RJ

pooltchr
01-18-2005, 05:24 AM
Tom,
I like your "Winning attitude" way of thinking. I absolutely know I can win any game I am playing. I'm not out to destroy an opponent, but I am out to win, and I go for it 100%. If my opponent wins, he must have played better than I, but if I play my game, I know my odds improve.
Steve

loofnicnad
01-18-2005, 05:44 AM
I don't come anywhere close to having a "killer instinct". However there are days when I am in a groove and feel as though I am running through the rack with a great amount of ease.
Usually, when that happens, I find a way to let my opponent into the game and am reminded, once again, that I am not yet a truly skillful player.

Sid_Vicious
01-18-2005, 06:50 AM
"Part of me thinks that I've got their respect by giving them a real tight match.Another part of me says that they don't respect me at all and never will until I'm the one winning 60-65%, while they are the ones only winning 35-40%.

Being respectful competition has satisfied my appetite for a season. Now I need to know how to learn to close the deal and become a killer."

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ ~~~~~~~

You just hit the nail on the head! No brag but "I got game!" and yet the splendid operation I make getting to the easiest finishing ball(s) on the table, to only find a glitch and then the tide turns their way, causes a loss of respect from others, and I guess rightfully so. It is pitiful to bust a run late like that, the "regular pool hounds" rarely let up and lose.

I'll tell ya something as a fact, but not advice...I'll dominate when I get really pissed off at something, I figure the anger takes away my niceness factor or something, I will not option for that on purpose though! Only other time I run to the win regularly is when I'm totally and undeniably happy, like when you have the bliss of a new relationship, a balance besides the PH. But make me a regular guy with my common everyday emotions and all of that changes. Like I said, I KNOW I can play well up to the apparent finish, and then I can sometimes find a way to miss in straight-in winning shots. Damn it gets borderline depressing...sid~~~finishes more than the early days, but far less than he should

GeraldG
01-18-2005, 07:27 AM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote Sid_Vicious:</font><hr> "Part of me thinks that I've got their respect by giving them a real tight match.Another part of me says that they don't respect me at all and never will until I'm the one winning 60-65%, while they are the ones only winning 35-40%.

Being respectful competition has satisfied my appetite for a season. Now I need to know how to learn to close the deal and become a killer."

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ ~~~~~~~

You just hit the nail on the head! No brag but "I got game!" and yet the splendid operation I make getting to the easiest finishing ball(s) on the table, to only find a glitch and then the tide turns their way, causes a loss of respect from others, and I guess rightfully so. It is pitiful to bust a run late like that, the "regular pool hounds" rarely let up and lose.

I'll tell ya something as a fact, but not advice...I'll dominate when I get really pissed off at something, I figure the anger takes away my niceness factor or something, I will not option for that on purpose though! Only other time I run to the win regularly is when I'm totally and undeniably happy, like when you have the bliss of a new relationship, a balance besides the PH. But make me a regular guy with my common everyday emotions and all of that changes. Like I said, I KNOW I can play well up to the apparent finish, and then I can sometimes find a way to miss in straight-in winning shots. Damn it gets borderline depressing...sid~~~finishes more than the early days, but far less than he should <hr /></blockquote>

I think maybe the key is to forget about the game ball. What I mean is to treat every shot on the table exactly the same. What I see happening to a lot of people (and it happens to me, too) is they'll have a shot on the 9-ball (or 8-ball, or whatever) that's well within their capability, and they'll rattle it in the pocket. Or, they'll have an easy out on the 8 and 9and either miss the 8 or fail miserably to get position on the 9. Why? Because they are aware it's the winning ball or key shot, they think they have it well in hand, and then they fail to finish. Sometimes it gets blamed on "overconfidence", sometimes on "choking". Either way it's the same thing. They treated that shot differently than the shots that led up to that point.

Every shot on the table is exactly the same as any other shot. What that means is that if you approach every shot as if you have to continue the run...same approch to the shot, same pre-shot routine, same setup, same stroke, same follow-through...you shouldn't have that problem.

Conventional wisdom is that when you are shooting the 9-ball for the win, you should only worry about pocketing the 9-ball..and not worry about position. I don't do it that way. If I do, I slip into that mindset that this is the last ball, and mentally I'll let up. I try to play position for the center of the table on the 9-ball shot. That keeps me in the mindset that I have to continue the run and I'll approach it like any other shot.

If you know and let your mind accept the idea that "This is the game shot", you are much more likely to stand up on the shot or fail to stroke through and finish or slip into a myriad of other bad habits.

I also try to read my opponent in the beginning of the match and see if I can find a chink in his armor. If he's a quick player, I slow down...not to the point of being obnoxious or running out of shot clock, but using all of the time available to me. If he's high -strung and impatient, I'll play safe much more than usual and make him kick, bank, or jump a lot. The idea is to disrupt his game, within the rules and good sportsmanship and not really let him settle into his game. I try to treat it just like a poker game. I try not to show ANY emotion. Just get up and execute my shots best I can and go sit back down. I don't carry on conversations. If I make a really good shot (very likely way over my head), I just act like it's nothing unusual at all....just move on to the next shot. Sometimes I get VERY angry with myself for a bad shot, but I don't let it show and I've forgotten about it by the time I get to my chair. I NEVER let my opponent make me angry. No matter what he does. If his behavior become rude or unruly or unsportsmanlike, I try to simply ignore it. If it gets beyond ignoring, I simply very calmly go and get the TD and ask him to handle it.

Chopstick
01-18-2005, 08:37 AM
You may have a killer instinct and not know it. It's not a feeling it's something else. I was involved in training attack dogs years ago. I was the agitator. The first time out you have to do things to the dog the make it attack. What you are doing is cultivating the natural hunting instinct of the dogs through their emotions. You teach them that certain behavior in humans identifies them as prey and activates the instincts that are already there.

I don't feel like a killer. The way it happens to me is when I get backed into a corner in a match and somehow my game shifts into a whole different level and before I know it, I won. It doesn't always happen and I am unable to duplicate that level of play in practice. I think it's a combination of desire and pressure that triggers the event. Don't be so quick to write yourself off as not being a killer. You have to set up the right conditions in yourself to let that instinct take over when you need it. The only thing I remember feeling is right before it happens my ears feel hot.


ChopStick &lt;~~~Killer

MosconiJr
01-18-2005, 09:49 AM
I agree basically with what Tom_in_Cincy has to say, but here is the way I developed a little "KILLER INSTINCT".

First if someone tells me not to concentrate on the "game ball", then I will certainly concentrate on it. It's just a force of nature. The best way I handle things is to think to myself "no mistakes". I don't worry about which ball I'm on, what game in the set it is, or anything like that. That doesn't put more pressure on you toward the end of the game. It's easy to say to take things one shot at a time, but it's not that easy. Doing it takes a plan like this. After a while you start to think about getting perfect shape on every shot, and less about the dramatics of case ball, score, or other things like that. It feels a little funny at first, but after a while it really helps take the pressure off. At first, after every shot just say to yourself "no mistakes". In time it will become part of your routine and you will run out more in pressure situations.

Anyway, it has helped me more than hypnosis tapes or anything else I have tried.

Mosconi Jr.

Wally_in_Cincy
01-18-2005, 09:52 AM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote MosconiJr:</font><hr>
...At first, after every shot just say to yourself "no mistakes".... <hr /></blockquote>

visualizing the shot helps me

SPetty
01-18-2005, 11:27 AM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote MosconiJr:</font><hr> At first, after every shot just say to yourself "no mistakes"<hr /></blockquote>It seems it would be more effective if you said it to yourself before every shot...

I really like this idea. I wonder if I'll remember it for more than 10 minutes.

recoveryjones
01-18-2005, 11:50 PM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote MosconiJr:</font><hr> I agree basically with what Tom_in_Cincy has to say, but here is the way I developed a little "KILLER INSTINCT".

After a while you start to think about getting perfect shape on every shot, and less about the dramatics of case ball, score, or other things like that. It feels a little funny at first, but after a while it really helps take the pressure off. At first, after every shot just say to yourself "no mistakes". In time it will become part of your routine and you will run out more in pressure situations.

Anyway, it has helped me more than hypnosis tapes or anything else I have tried.

Mosconi Jr.
<hr /></blockquote>

I like your post. I can be a lazy slug at times when it comes to playing shape. Instead of trying to land the cue ball on an exact spot, I just try to get in the general vicinity and keep an angle.This kind of sloppiness has me drifting across shape lines and speed control gives me more problems than anything.

Every shot is critical and on any one shot momentum can change and a match can be lost. At the pro level you may get the luxury of one or two mistakes in a match, sometimes none.

At my level you maybe get 3 or 4, however, there comes a time when things are extremley critical and extra mistakes will cost you. I think your discipline to presicion will help cut down on those sloppy match costing mistakes.You've learned to be a killer,thanks for the apprenticeship. RJ

pooltchr
01-19-2005, 05:57 AM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote SPetty:</font><hr> <blockquote><font class="small">Quote MosconiJr:</font><hr> At first, after every shot just say to yourself "no mistakes"<hr /></blockquote>It seems it would be more effective if you said it to yourself before every shot...

I really like this idea. I wonder if I'll remember it for more than 10 minutes. <hr /></blockquote>

The word "mistake" is a negative term, not something you even want floating around in your head when you are shooting. Turn it into a positive. "I will nail this shot and get perfect shape". It's a much better mental image to have before shooting.
Steve

MosconiJr
01-19-2005, 01:24 PM
The word "mistake" is a negative term, not something you even want floating around in your head when you are shooting. Turn it into a positive. "I will nail this shot and get perfect shape". It's a much better mental image to have before shooting.
Steve <hr /></blockquote>

I suppose that if your psyche is that delicate, then it would help to have only positive thoughts. In fact, that brings up another good discussion. Sometimes I wonder if players worry too much about the most trivial mental things and these things end up hurting their progress. I'm not sure the mind is so delicate that it will cause errors just by the choice of a word. It's almost like it's something else to blame when a shot is missed to keep from putting the blame where it belongs; on a player's lack of concentration or their bad fundamentals.

Don't misunderstand, I feel that the mental side of the game is very important, but sometimes I think that people look for every reason available to blame for the hindrance of thier progress except what it takes to improve.

Now, I'm from the old school of play, feeling that having something to lose (gambling, tournaments, etc.) causes the most progress in ability. I feel that there need to be consequences for missing.

Hopefully other will give their opinions. I'm curious to hear how others on the board feel about this issue.

MosconiJr

pooltchr
01-19-2005, 03:04 PM
It's not a question of a delicate psyche. It's acknowledging the power of the mind. Subconciously, your mind can have an impact on your physical action. Have you ever looked at a shot and thought to yourself "Don't Scratch", only to have the white ball go straight to the pocket? Whatever mental image you get will have a good chance of happening. Keeping a positive mental image is part of the mental game.

GeraldG
01-19-2005, 03:28 PM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote pooltchr:</font><hr> It's not a question of a delicate psyche. It's acknowledging the power of the mind. Subconciously, your mind can have an impact on your physical action. Have you ever looked at a shot and thought to yourself "Don't Scratch", only to have the white ball go straight to the pocket? Whatever mental image you get will have a good chance of happening. Keeping a positive mental image is part of the mental game. <hr /></blockquote>

I agree entirely with this. Have you ever heard of "Target Fixation"? Have you ever been riding a bicycle and no matter how hard you tried to avoid sideswiping that parked car or mailbox or whatever, it was like there was a big magnet pulling the bicycle right into it? It's because you were looking at it and fixed on it and that's where your mind willed your muscles to take you. Consciously you were frantically saying "DOn't hit that car...DON'T HIT THAT CAR!", but you your subconscious brain was saying "OK, that's where he's looking so that must be where he wants to go." BANG! You hit the car anyway.

I used to road-race motorcycles(WERA B-Superbike). This was one of the things we learned in racing school. Your subconscious mind is an extremely powerful thing...it can make things go right for you, or it can make them go terribly wrong in an instant. You have to learn how to make it work for you instead of against you. All it takes in pool is one fleeting thought of missing a shot while you're down on the shot and your mind will take over from there and you will miss. Or, as pooltchr said, just think "Don't scratch"...chances are, that's exactly what will happen...whitey ROCKETS to the pocket. For me it's better to pick my point on the rail where I WANT the CB to hit and think about that instead. You will go where you are looking, so you might as well look where you want to go.

MosconiJr
01-20-2005, 06:15 AM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote pooltchr:</font><hr> It's not a question of a delicate psyche. It's acknowledging the power of the mind. Subconciously, your mind can have an impact on your physical action. Have you ever looked at a shot and thought to yourself "Don't Scratch", only to have the white ball go straight to the pocket? Whatever mental image you get will have a good chance of happening. Keeping a positive mental image is part of the mental game. <hr /></blockquote>

Sorry guys. Since I have learned to play somewhat proficiently, I don't say "don't scratch". I look at a shot and if the odds are better that I shoot the shot a certain way and a scratch is a possibility, so be it. The odds of not scratching may be better than the odds of missing if I shoot another way. And I haven't been on a bike since I was a kid. Even then, I don't remember saying "don't hit that mailbox" or "don't run into that car". If either of these statements are normal mental thought, I'm glad I'm not normal. It seems to me that mindsets like this would lead to being afraid to leave your house without saying "don't have an auto accident" if you get into your car to drive, or "I hope this guy doesn't rob me" if you pass someone on the street.

I'm not trying to be a wise guy, but I think this proves my point that some people worry too much about the mental side of pool (and life) instead of just playing the game.

MosconiJr

GeraldG
01-20-2005, 06:21 AM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote MosconiJr:</font><hr> <blockquote><font class="small">Quote pooltchr:</font><hr> It's not a question of a delicate psyche. It's acknowledging the power of the mind. Subconciously, your mind can have an impact on your physical action. Have you ever looked at a shot and thought to yourself "Don't Scratch", only to have the white ball go straight to the pocket? Whatever mental image you get will have a good chance of happening. Keeping a positive mental image is part of the mental game. <hr /></blockquote>

Sorry guys. Since I have learned to play somewhat proficiently, I don't say "don't scratch". I look at a shot and if the odds are better that I shoot the shot a certain way and a scratch is a possibility, so be it. The odds of not scratching may be better than the odds of missing if I shoot another way. And I haven't been on a bike since I was a kid. Even then, I don't remember saying "don't hit that mailbox" or "don't run into that car". If either of these statements are normal mental thought, I'm glad I'm not normal. It seems to me that mindsets like this would lead to being afraid to leave your house without saying "don't have an auto accident" if you get into your car to drive, or "I hope this guy doesn't rob me" if you pass someone on the street.

I'm not trying to be a wise guy, but I think this proves my point that some people worry too much about the mental side of pool (and life) instead of just playing the game.

MosconiJr <hr /></blockquote>

Whatever works!

JimS
01-20-2005, 06:29 AM
One has to think about what they DO want as opposed to what they don't want.

When a scratch is seen as a possibility when shooting a shot a particular way then the shot needs to be altered to have the cb go to a precise target on the table that would preclude the scratch possibility.

Sid_Vicious
01-20-2005, 06:38 AM
There's a statement "it takes ten optimists to pull one pessimist back up, but only one pessimist to pull ten optimists down." The negative thought about failing on a shot, be it ever so brief, takes much more to fix than merely switching thoughts and going through pre-shot again. I can many times imagine the most bizzare ways to possibly scratch and it happens like magic, if I try to make it positive to fix it, best I seem to do it miss both the shot and the scratch...sid~~~bikes and motorcycles do steer into what you look at, take my word for it

GeraldG
01-20-2005, 08:55 AM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote Sid_Vicious:</font><hr> There's a statement "it takes ten optimists to pull one pessimist back up, but only one pessimist to pull ten optimists down." The negative thought about failing on a shot, be it ever so brief, takes much more to fix than merely switching thoughts and going through pre-shot again. I can many times imagine the most bizzare ways to possibly scratch and it happens like magic, if I try to make it positive to fix it, best I seem to do it miss both the shot and the scratch...sid<hr /></blockquote>


Yep. This is another of my (many) problems that I have to constantly work on and discipline myself for. If I am on a shot and have any of those thoughts, I try to stand up, start over and think about what I want to happen and concentrate on that. If I do, the results are much better. Unfortunately, for some reason, I don't always do that. Then I find myself watching the cueball disappear into the pocket and thinking to myself "Now, why did I do that? I knew I should have started over on that shot." You are right...if I simply go through pre-shot again, it doesn't necessarily fix the problem..I have to redirect my thoughts.

<blockquote><font class="small">Quote Sid_Vicious:</font><hr>~~~bikes and motorcycles do steer into what you look at, take my word for it <hr /></blockquote>

I have the titanium bits and pieces in me to prove it......:) If you do that on the racetrack at 100+ mph, the thing you are likely to fix on is another motorcycle (since there's not much else around), or the edge of the track (when you're too hot and you're running out of track). Things happen very quickly and it gets ugly.

bomber
01-20-2005, 09:59 AM
For me, it depends on several things. I will admit some things about myself that are bad, but oh well. I only have a killer instinct when gambling or if i am in a tourny that has a decent pay off. The cash brings out the killer in me. When i am gambling, i have more of a killer instinct when i am asked to play instead of asking to play. Normally if someone asks if i want to play them some one pocket for the cash, ill say "sure" and my mindset is that i want to embarass this guy. If i am fishing for a game, i am normally bored and just wanting to pass the time by gambling (my favorite hobby unfortunately). I dont have the killer mindset in this situation. I sure dont have that killer mindset when i am just knocking them around or even if i am truly practicing....it kinda takes the fun out of it for me. maybe i should work on that.