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Nostalgia
01-19-2005, 08:42 AM
Hey all. I played in the APA the last few seasons. I was a SL6 in 8-ball and an SL5 in 9-ball. I consider myself a fairly good player, but I don't run racks very often. In fact, I've only run a rack of 9-ball once.

Anyway, I played in a tournament last night. Format was race to 4 on the winner side, race to 3 on the loser side. My first match I had to give the called 7. I got creamed, 1-4. On the loser side, I again had to give the 7. I got murdered again, 0-3. Every game was because I either left the 7 hanging or did something really stupid right before it. Part of it was first-night-jitters (I missed some shots I should NEVER miss), but part was just not knowing the format.

I've never played this format in 9-ball before. I know the strategy for play is going to be different when I'm giving up balls. I'd love to hear some suggestions from all of you on how I can play better strategy in this format.

Thanks,

-Joe

Troy
01-19-2005, 08:55 AM
When gettting the 7, be SURE you can get through it when shooting the 5 or 6. Otherwise, play safe.

Troy
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote Nostalgia:</font><hr> Hey all. I played in the APA the last few seasons. I was a SL6 in 8-ball and an SL5 in 9-ball. I consider myself a fairly good player, but I don't run racks very often. In fact, I've only run a rack of 9-ball once.

Anyway, I played in a tournament last night. Format was race to 4 on the winner side, race to 3 on the loser side. My first match I had to give the called 7. I got creamed, 1-4. On the loser side, I again had to give the 7. I got murdered again, 0-3. Every game was because I either left the 7 hanging or did something really stupid right before it. Part of it was first-night-jitters (I missed some shots I should NEVER miss), but part was just not knowing the format.

I've never played this format in 9-ball before. I know the strategy for play is going to be different when I'm giving up balls. I'd love to hear some suggestions from all of you on how I can play better strategy in this format.

Thanks,

-Joe <hr /></blockquote>

vapoolplayer
01-19-2005, 09:33 AM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote Nostalgia:</font><hr> Hey all. I played in the APA the last few seasons. I was a SL6 in 8-ball and an SL5 in 9-ball. I consider myself a fairly good player, but I don't run racks very often. In fact, I've only run a rack of 9-ball once.

Anyway, I played in a tournament last night. Format was race to 4 on the winner side, race to 3 on the loser side. My first match I had to give the called 7. I got creamed, 1-4. On the loser side, I again had to give the 7. I got murdered again, 0-3. Every game was because I either left the 7 hanging or did something really stupid right before it. Part of it was first-night-jitters (I missed some shots I should NEVER miss), but part was just not knowing the format.

I've never played this format in 9-ball before. I know the strategy for play is going to be different when I'm giving up balls. I'd love to hear some suggestions from all of you on how I can play better strategy in this format.

Thanks,

-Joe <hr /></blockquote>

no offense here, but a 5 in the apa really shouldn't be spotting someone the 7 ball unless the opponent can't run more than a ball or two. i think the tournament director may have given you a bad handicap. if you can't run a rack, and you're giving someone the 7 ball....chances are you aint gonna like it.

HallofFame
01-19-2005, 09:37 AM
That's why they're called HANDICAPPED!

It's virtually impossibly to win a SHORT race like that giving up balls, you have to play at the top of your game EVERY game; AND, your opponent CAN'T get lucky (for example, hide you every time he/she misses). How many times does that happen? Not Many.

NOW, let's say you're a great breaker and can make a ball or two EVERY break. Your next match is race to 3,4,5; you give up the 5 ball and ALL the breaks. Well, break your stick apart and go home.

These local tournaments are designed for the weaker players and younger kids to win or else THEY wouldn't enter the tournament, and without them there IS NO tournament.

These type tournaments are fun and exciting for less than great players; but, if you can play a decent game of pool it is very hard to win. AND, if you get good enough you'll have to give up the 5,6,7,8, a game or two on the wire, plus the breaks; NOW try to win. You better be running out every rack; and if you're doing that, why are you playing in these tournaments anyway? You should be on the pro tour.

Here is another factor to consider. Just about every time a weaker player misses a shot it is missed so poorly that many of the OTHER balls get repositioned around the table and most likely clustered up; this is just as bad as being snookered after every miss. If you watch great players shoot they virtually NEVER run into other balls unless they absolutely have to. Try not to rearrange the balls on YOURSELF at least; if you do not have a make-able shot play a safe, which brings me to my last paragraph.

Troy gave some GREAT advice in playing safe, a weak player will kick and hit the object ball maybe once out of 25 times and it's probably pure luck the once he/she hits the ball. Unfortunately, it's the better player that usually ends up snookered after a poorly played shot; and more times than not, it's right before or on the handicapped balls.

HOF

GeraldG
01-19-2005, 10:22 AM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote HallofFame:</font><hr> That's why they're called HANDICAPPED!

It's virtually impossibly to win a SHORT race like that giving up balls, you have to play at the top of your game EVERY game; AND, your opponent CAN'T get lucky (for example, hide you every time he/she misses). How many times does that happen? Not Many.

NOW, let's say you're a great breaker and can make a ball or two EVERY break. Your next match is race to 3,4,5; you give up the 5 ball and ALL the breaks. Well, break your stick apart and go home.

These local tournaments are designed for the weaker players and younger kids to win or else THEY wouldn't enter the tournament, and without them there IS NO tournament.

These type tournaments are fun and exciting for less than great players; but, if you can play a decent game of pool it is very hard to win. AND, if you get good enough you'll have to give up the 5,6,7,8, a game or two on the wire, plus the breaks; NOW try to win. You better be running out every rack; and if you're doing that, why are you playing in these tournaments anyway? You should be on the pro tour.

Here is another factor to consider. Just about every time a weaker player misses a shot it is missed so poorly that many of the OTHER balls get repositioned around the table and most likely clustered up; this is just as bad as being snookered after every miss. If you watch great players shoot they virtually NEVER run into other balls unless they absolutely have to. Try not to rearrange the balls on YOURSELF at least; if you do not have a make-able shot play a safe, which brings me to my last paragraph.

Troy gave some GREAT advice in playing safe, a weak player will kick and hit the object ball maybe once out of 25 times and it's probably pure luck the once he/she hits the ball. Unfortunately, it's the better player that usually ends up snookered after a poorly played shot; and more times than not, it's right before or on the handicapped balls.

HOF
<hr /></blockquote>

Agreed. Isn't it amazing, when you're playing a weak player, how often you'll end up shooting off the rail or hooked...and you KNOW it was entirely accidental?

cheesemouse
01-19-2005, 10:48 AM
Nostalgia,

When you are the one 'giving' the weight it just means your a better player and a smarter player. You have to use these advantages to your benefit. You have to pay special attention to his weight ball. Him/her being the weaker player more than likely doesn't know how to use his/her weight to advantage, they will become pre-occuppied with their weight ball....you can use this against them. You can tease them into taking very low % swings at their weight and stop them from playing the better % shot...it works in the long run...it's easier said than done.

...I take it all back just ride the cheese every chance you get.....hehehe.....


/ccboard/images/graemlins/grin.gif /ccboard/images/graemlins/grin.gif /ccboard/images/graemlins/grin.gif

SpiderMan
01-19-2005, 11:42 AM
It sounds like they handicapped you too much, hopefully this tournament provides for performance-based adjustments.

SpiderMan

jjinfla
01-19-2005, 11:52 AM
If it was your first tournament they probably rated you as a 6 to start and you played a couple of 4's so you had to give up the 7. But then you jawed the 7 and lost. Same thing would have happened if you jawed the 9. So that really doesn't say anything. Maybe next time they will lower you to a 5.

Don't forget to rack the spot ball right behind the 1.

For some reason I find it easier to spot the 7 than the 8. Maybe it is just that I know I am playing a weaker player. Or could it be that by the time I make the 8 and get to the 9 I am out of line? LOL

Jake

bomber
01-19-2005, 12:34 PM
i agree, you got a bad spot...if you are giving up a ball and you know you cant run out, play more safties...you need to play more conservatively, especially if you are not good enough to give that much weight. Giving up weight is an art and it is learned over time. How well you do giving up weight is determined by how well you manipulate the table.

On a different note, many handicapped tournys are designed to level the playing field, but in my experience the stronger players will come out ahead more times than not. We have a local friday night 9 ball tourny that traditionally gets 15-20 players. It is an A plus to D tourny. I find that more A's and B pluses come in the money than C's and D's. I would like to add, however, that our spots are not outrageous. An A plus would give the 7 and the break to a B player and the 7/8 and break to a C. Our level of competition is pretty high in my room as well.