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SecaucusFats
01-19-2005, 01:48 PM
For those of us who survived the 40's, 50's, 60's, and / or 70's

First, many of us survived being born to mothers who smoked and/or drank while they carried us. They also took aspirin, ate blue cheese dressing and didn't get tested for diabetes.

Then, after that trauma, we were placed in baby cribs covered with brightly colored lead-based paints.

We had no childproof lids on medicine bottles, doors or cabinets, and when we rode our bikes, we had no helmets, not to mention the risks we took hitchhiking.

As children, we would ride in cars with no seat belts or air bags. Riding in the back of a pickup on a warm day was always a special treat.

We drank water from the garden hose and not from a bottle.

We shared one soft drink with four friends, from one bottle and no one actually died from this.

We ate cupcakes, bread and butter and drank soda pop with sugar in it, but we weren't overweight because WE WERE ALWAYS OUTSIDE PLAYING!

We would leave home in the morning and play all day, as long as we were back when the streetlights came on. No one was able to reach us all day. And we were O.K.

We would spend hours building our go-carts out of scraps and then ride down the hill; only to find out we forgot the brakes. After running into the bushes a few times, we learned to solve the problem.

We did not have Playstations, Nintendos, X-boxes; no video games at all, no 500 channels on cable, no video tape movies, no Surround-Sound, no cell phones, no personal computers, no internet or internet chat rooms. WE HAD FRIENDS and we went outside and found them!

We fell out of trees, got cut, broke bones and teeth, and there were no lawsuits from these accidents.

We made up games with sticks and tennis balls and ate worms, and although we were told it would happen, we did not put out many eyes, nor did the worms live in us forever.

We rode bikes or walked to a friend's house and knocked on the door or rang the bell, or just walked in and talked to them!

Little league had tryouts and not EVERYONE made the team. Those who didn't had to learn to DEAL with disappointment. Imagine that!!

The idea of a parent bailing us out if we broke the law was unheard of. They actually sided with the law!

This generation has produced some of the best risk-takers, problem solvers and inventors ever!

The past 50 years have been an explosion of innovation and new ideas.

We had freedom, failure, success and responsibility, and we learned how to deal with it ALL!

And YOU are one of them! CONGRATULATIONS! You had the luck to grow up as a kid, before lawyers and government regulated our lives "for our own good."

Kind of makes you want to run through the house
with scissors, doesn't it?
*************************************************

SF

Sid_Vicious
01-19-2005, 02:10 PM
Great words there SF! Kinda neat to realize that we were lucky to have had the 50s and 60s to play around in as a kid. All these helmets and sanitized preventions that parents heap upon their kids these days probably lessen the kid's resilience for survival. I totally feel that many people who survived without tubes in the ears as a child, picked up dropped food and ate it instead of tossing everything,,,ended up being the ones who never developed as many alergies as the over protected ones. Jm2c...sid

Chopstick
01-19-2005, 02:43 PM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote SecaucusFats:</font><hr>

This generation has produced some of the best risk-takers, problem solvers and inventors ever!

<hr /></blockquote>

Hell Yeah SF! You guys remember the first Woody Woodpecker or the first Popeyes. Cartoons were a work of art back in then days. The ones the came after were little more than stick drawings. How bout this guy?

My Hero.

http://www.stoogeworld.com/_Biographies/Curlyport.jpg

dg-in-centralpa
01-19-2005, 03:12 PM
Count me in on this.

DG - don't know how we survived

Wally_in_Cincy
01-19-2005, 03:25 PM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote SecaucusFats:</font><hr>
..This generation has produced some of the best risk-takers, problem solvers and inventors ever!

<hr /></blockquote>

Surely that is true but the baby-boom generation also has produced a lot of spoiled whiners who do not take responsibility for their own actions.

Wally &lt;~~ boomer

roscoe
01-20-2005, 07:17 AM
And we played with GUNS!

Roscoe

cheesemouse
01-20-2005, 08:22 AM
SecaucusFats,

Good post.....my mother used to put food in bowl out on the back steps for me, just like a dog. /ccboard/images/graemlins/grin.gif I would go days in the summer w/o seeing either parent because I liked to sleep in the tree strips at the edge of town....THE GOOD OLD DAYS..... /ccboard/images/graemlins/tongue.gif

hondo
01-20-2005, 11:33 AM
He's my hero too, Chop. Whoop! Whoop! Nyuk! NyuK!


<blockquote><font class="small">Quote Chopstick:</font><hr> <blockquote><font class="small">Quote SecaucusFats:</font><hr>

This generation has produced some of the best risk-takers, problem solvers and inventors ever!

<hr /></blockquote>

Hell Yeah SF! You guys remember the first Woody Woodpecker or the first Popeyes. Cartoons were a work of art back in then days. The ones the came after were little more than stick drawings. How bout this guy?

My Hero.

http://www.stoogeworld.com/_Biographies/Curlyport.jpg <hr /></blockquote>

hondo
01-20-2005, 11:34 AM
Aw, Wally, why would you sat a mean thing like that?


<blockquote><font class="small">Quote Wally_in_Cincy:</font><hr> <blockquote><font class="small">Quote SecaucusFats:</font><hr>
..This generation has produced some of the best risk-takers, problem solvers and inventors ever!

<hr /></blockquote>

Surely that is true but the baby-boom generation also has produced a lot of spoiled whiners who do not take responsibility for their own actions.

Wally &lt;~~ boomer <hr /></blockquote>

Wally_in_Cincy
01-20-2005, 01:23 PM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote hondo:</font><hr> Aw, Wally, why would you sat a mean thing like that?


<hr /></blockquote>

Because I'm a heartless Republican /ccboard/images/graemlins/smile.gif

Harold Acosta
01-20-2005, 08:38 PM
Ahhh, The good old days! Grew up during the 60's in NYC.

Playing stick-ball, basketball, and handball in the streets of NYC; then opening the fire hidrants to cool off!

My parents used to let me stay in the streets until about 9 pm (during summer days) with my 4 cousins and brother. We were a gang by ourselves!. What a helluva of a time! We all had red wagons, scooters, metal roller skates, and bicycles (Royce Union). Boy, did I crash many of times! Just got up and kept going.

Listening to the Beatles, the Monkeys, Jackson 5 and Osmond Brothers (great rivalry but I hated them both although some good songs), Diana Ross and the Supremes, everything from Motown. Barry White and Love Unlimited Orchestra in the 70's.

Watching Batman &amp; Robin (I loved Bat Girl), Superman (didnt like much, except watching him squirm with Kryptonite), the Green Hornet, Shazam, I Dream of Jeanie (I always dreamt about her), Bewitched, My Three Sons, 3 Stooges, Laugh-in (Here comes the Judge), Ed Sulivan Show, The Hulk and Captain America (cartoons), Thor, Speedy-Gonzalez, the Road Runner, Bugs Bunny, Daffy-Duck (too wacky for me), Mr. Ed (Super duper wacky), Mr. Magoo, Mighty Mouse...

Mr. Softee Ice Creams, White Castle Burgers, Charms Loli-pops, Tootsie Rolls, Raisenettes, Whoppers (Candy), M&amp;M's, Almond Joy, Sugar Daddy's....

Nowadays, my kids have grown up (16 and 19), and they have not done half the things I did as a kid. I wouldn't let them go alone anywhere without the presence of an adult.

Good post Secaucus!

Ross
01-21-2005, 04:58 PM
SF, I agree with a lot of your sentiments. Especially the part about playing outside. I was raised by my grandparents mostly and they, being Pentecostals, thought TV was a sin. So I spent little time vegetating - it was too boring. We would play flag football for hours after school every day. Other days it was pick up basegall. I was always either outside playing during the daylight hours and usually reading at night. Until I was 14, when I began driving tractor in my "free" time.

A lot of the changes from yesteryear just reflect the downside of technological progress. I'm sure if we (as a generation) had Nintendo's and X-boxes we would have fritter our hours away in front of them as well.

It wasn't all great back then either. You mention the Little League thing. Well I was small for my age, 4' 11" at age 14! (Good thing I kept growing to my current whopping 5'7"! /ccboard/images/graemlins/smirk.gif) So, as a hitter, even though I could make contact on the ball I usually would hit a ground out. For a couple of years it was no problem. I could field a bit so my coach would play me a couple of innings in most games. I guess I wasn't hurting the team too much! /ccboard/images/graemlins/grin.gif But then we got a new coach who was VERY competitive. His son did most of the pitching for our team. Anyway this coach played me in one game (for 3 innings) over the entire season. I went to every practice and never complained, but it really sucked. Looking back I should have said something but I wasn't raised that way. So while I understand your point that things can get too PC and "non-competitive" I'm still glad coaches can't get away with that anymore.

Also about the safety regulations (no seatbelts, helmets and all). It certainly did feel nice to not have to worry about those things, but those freedoms came with a life altering cost for some families. From the first report on children's injuries that popped up on Google:


Children's death rates from unintentional injury have dropped by almost 40 percent since 1987, according to a 13-year study released by the National SAFE KIDS Campaign. Unintentional injury is the top killer of children under 14, ahead of cancer and birth defects. More than 5,600 children in the United States die annually from unintentional injuries.

Motor vehicle occupant injury declined 16 percent but remained the leading cause of unintentional injury death, followed by drowning and pedestrian injury.
Bicycle-related deaths dropped 60 percent.
Firearms deaths showed the largest decrease, down 72 percent.
The least progress was made in poisoning prevention, down just 5 percent, although the category saw a 41 percent decline from 1981 to 1987.


And those are just decreases from '87. I can't imagine what the drop has been since the 1950's. So everything is a tradeoff.

My only point is that we have lost a lot over time, but that it wasn't ALL rosy back then either. But I do miss the good parts of the 50's and 60's.

Ross ~ wishes all electronic games for kids could be outlawed

cheesemouse
01-21-2005, 10:37 PM
Ross,

[ QUOTE ]
SF, I agree with a lot of your sentiments<hr /></blockquote>

Ross, these are not his sentiments but he lets us believe there his words see: http://www.taxmama.com/AskTaxMama/289/money_funnies.html

...I'm telling you this guy is a pathetic plagaist...he sucked me in once but never again...SAD

SecaucusFats
01-22-2005, 02:41 AM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote Ross:</font><hr> SF, I agree with a lot of your sentiments.

<font color="blue">I received it in an e-mail from a buddy and like most of us older guys I agree with the sentiments expressed. It was a different era, a friendlier and more innocent age. </font color>

Especially the part about playing outside. I was raised by my grandparents mostly and they, being Pentecostals, thought TV was a sin.
<font color="blue">My grandmother was a Pentecostal, my parents Catholic. I remember Grandma taking my sister and I to a Pentecostal service. My sister and I were scared witless! We thought they were all going crazy. We cried so much that Grandma had to take us home before it was over. /ccboard/images/graemlins/laugh.gif </font color>

So I spent little time vegetating - it was too boring. We would play flag football for hours after school every day. Other days it was pick up basegall. I was always either outside playing during the daylight hours and usually reading at night. Until I was 14, when I began driving tractor in my "free" time.

<font color="blue">I would be out all day too. I'd meet up with some friends and play stick-ball, basketball, football, or hockey on roller skates. Other times we'd go down to the Hudson River and fish for striped bass (mostly we'd catch eels), you couldn't eat the fish due to pollution so we'd throw 'em back in. </font color>

&lt;snip&gt;

My only point is that we have lost a lot over time, but that it wasn't ALL rosy back then either. But I do miss the good parts of the 50's and 60's.

<font color="blue">One of the really bad things I remember from the 60's and early 70's was hearing that some kid's brother, or dad, was killed in VietNam. It happened with alarming regularity and it was hard to understand at such a young age. </font color>

Ross ~ wishes all electronic games for kids could be outlawed <hr /></blockquote>

SF

SnakebyteXX
01-22-2005, 07:01 AM
I was a kid in the 50's and 60's. I can remember going to a county fair in Missouri when I was five. There weren't too many fairway games that a five year old could play. But one - "dip the floating ducky with the number on the bottom and win a prize". My prize? A packet of firecrackers! Neither my paretnts nor my grandparents batted an eye over my winning a package of explosives. In fact, as soon as we got back home they gave me a book of matches and sent me out into the backyard with a much older next door neighbor kid (7) to show me how to set them off. Those were the days...

Got my first gun when I was six (Red Ryder BB gun) and was given free reign to terrorize the neighborhood cats - sparrows - carboard boxes - mutually armed playmates.... A pump up Crossman pellet rifle when I was nine and a Remington .22 rifle by the time I was 11.

I can remember when only one or two families on the block owned a television and all us kids would flock to their homes to watch the Lone Ranger or Howdy Doody or Hopalong Cassady (in between hours of staring at 'call sign broadcasts' because there wasn't enough programming available to keep the TV going all day).

All the shows were black and white in those days and reception was generally limited to two or three channels ranging from 'pretty good' to 'snowstorm' quality. I can remember having to climb up on the roof to turn the antenna in the direction of whatever far away station we were trying to watch so that the picture would come in better. Anyone here remember covering the 'rabbit ears' on top of the set with aluminum foil for that little extra signal boost? Or the first time they saw a color TV? (Walt Disney's "Wonderful World of Color" was one of the first shows to be broadcast in full color.) Remember when NBC had a peacock that spread it's tail feathers to announce that the upcoming showing was 'in living color'? And TV Guide put a 'C' symbol next to those programs that were?

In those days parents thought nothing of letting us kids walk miles around town all by themselves. We regularly walked a couple of miles to the movies or to school and back home - unescourted. Spent the day wondering around town or hanging out at friends houses with little more than a remonstration to 'be home in time for dinner'. Otherwise no one thought twice about where you were or if you were safe.

[ QUOTE ]
One of the really bad things I remember from the 60's and early 70's was hearing that some kid's brother, or dad, was killed in VietNam. It happened with alarming regularity and it was hard to understand at such a young age. <hr /></blockquote>

One of the really bad things I remember from the 60's was having several kids I'd grown up with die in Viet Nam - or come home without their feet or legs because they'd stepped on a land mine. Or, in some ways worse, come home with that 'thousand mile stare' that all too often afflicts men who have seen enough horror to last them several lifetimes. We children of the sixties lost a lot of our innocence during that time - and most if not all of our naievete about the so-called 'glories of war' - that's for sure.

Snake

Ross
01-22-2005, 02:58 PM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote SecaucusFats:</font><hr>
<font color="blue">My grandmother was a Pentecostal, my parents Catholic. I remember Grandma taking my sister and I to a Pentecostal service. My sister and I were scared witless! We thought they were all going crazy. We cried so much that Grandma had to take us home before it was over. /ccboard/images/graemlins/laugh.gif </font color>
SF <hr /></blockquote>

Yeah, SF, I can imagine how that would be overwhelming to a kid the first time you see it.

Can you imagine what it was like growing up in that? My grandparents and I usually went to these services four or five times a week. And during revivals it was 7 nights a week until 10 pm or so, complete with hell-fire and brimstone preaching, alter calls, wailing and speaking in tongues, falling to the floor, faith healing, and so on. I believed that stuff until I was about 13 when I started to realize that a lot of it made no sense. I remember wondering why my friend GW (no, not that GW) was going to hell because his church didn't use the right words during baptism. (Pentecostals believe you have to baptize in the name of JC to be saved, use the holy trinity and you remain unsaved.) Once I started questioning it didn't take long to see all kinds of problems with what the church's teachings. It was still hard to let go of because they had spent so many years brainwashing me.

Don't get me wrong - my grandparents were the salt of the earth and great people. They stepped in and took care of me when my mother couldn't. My grandmother just got caught up in this church as a teenager and believed its teachings all of her life. In fact she founded the church in my little home town. My grandfather resisted for 35 years (he was a bootlegger in his younger years) but finally gave in and joined the church when he was 57! Once that happened all of the fun he and I used to have (like going to the movies) stopped.

I guess that is why I like to go to pool halls -- it's my 180-degree turn from the repressiveness of being raised in a fundamentalist religion "cult."

highsea
01-22-2005, 03:52 PM
My sister emailed this list to me a while back. I'm one of the "survivors" too.

I think I had the best childhood any kid could ask for. Growing up in a small Alaskan town on an island, we had to make our own entertainment (most of which a kid today would go to jail for). I used to steal my dad's shotgun primers and sit on the cement outside the school doors with a hammer, whacking them one at a time.

My dad never let me have a bb gun, but I was deadly with a wristrocket. My first gun was a .30-06 that he cut down the stock to fit me. At 12 years old, I was a little guy, like Ross. That rifle taught me about respecting firearms in a big way! After I had proven myself with the -06, he let me have a .22 for plinking.

In junior high, I ran a trapline for my spending money. Twice a week I would grab my rifle and head into the woods alone for several hours. I got $40 bucks for a mink and $35 for a martin, which was damn good money for a kid in those days. I used old rusty spring traps that you can't even buy these days, because they are not "humane" (I was going to kill the critters anyway???). I baited them with herring from the freezer, and camoflaged the traps under the bait. In the springtime, I would put them in gunny sacks and hang them in the trees so I didn't have to pack them out. They were always still there when I started back up the next fall, right where I left them.

One time I was skinning a mink and my knife slipped and I nailed my thumb. I just sewed it up and kept going. Lol. I still have that scar today. I was never home before dark, and my parents never worried. There were lots of bears in those woods, but my dad had taught me about safety and survival in the woods, and I was never scared. Just alert. I got lost a few times, but always found my way out by following the streams.

If I wanted to take the family boat and go hunting for the weekend, a note on the fridge was good enough. Usually it was me and a friend, and we would go 40 or 50 miles from town by ourselves. Even at that age, I had been fishing with my dad and running the boat for 5 years already.

When I was in high school, I would take my rifle to school and put it in my locker so I didn't have to go home to get it after school. My dad wrote a letter to the tackle shop so I could buy ammunition when I was 13. People in Sitka would always stop to give me a lift as I hitch-hiked out of town with my rifle slung over one shoulder, and my gear in an old army surplus rucksack.

We didn't lock doors, there was no crime, and we didn't get into trouble. If you skipped school, you would get caught, because it was certain that someone would see you and call your parents.

Schools had big classrooms, rarely less than 40 kids. The teachers had big paddles hung from one end of the blackboard. You didn't smart-off in class, or you and the teacher were mano-a-mano in the hallway, and you would get laughed at in P.E. when everyone saw your bright red ass.

In the summertime, we would go swimming in the 48 degree ocean, and we thought it was warm.

We had the modern conveniences too, a black and white TV and two stations to watch. We had respect for our elders, and we ate what was on the plate without bitching about it, or we had a session with the belt.

Those truly were the good-ol days for me. We had freedoms and the responsibilities that went along with them. I wouldn't trade my childhood to anyone.
___________________________________________

nhp
01-22-2005, 04:17 PM
What about the offspring of those who were kids in the 70's or earlier?

highsea
01-22-2005, 04:45 PM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote nhp:</font><hr> What about the offspring of those who were kids in the 70's or earlier? <hr /></blockquote>Nintendo kids.

I took my brother and his family to the Bahamas a couple years back when he bought a boat in Florida. They sat in the salon playing Nintendo. WTF is that all about? You're in Bimini for Christ sake! Go beachcombing! Go snorkeling! Don't just sit inside the boat behind a locked gate and play video games, jeez.