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View Full Version : Dowel underneath ferulle tenon?



drawshot
01-19-2005, 05:44 PM
I got a new tip installed yesterday and my Cue tech noticed that I have a small dowel insert in the tenon of my cue underneath the ferulle. I think Predator do the same with a composite material. But what is the dowel for?

Cueless Joey
01-19-2005, 05:52 PM
You must have Cuetech Thunderbolt shaft.
Predator has no composite material inside the tenon. Just foam.

drawshot
01-20-2005, 01:43 AM
It's actually a Downey Custom cue. Cuetec does not interest me.

JimS
01-20-2005, 06:13 AM
If you know it's a Downey why not ask Downey what the dowel is for and then come back and tell us...I'm curious.

Troy
01-20-2005, 09:15 AM
I have installed a dowel as a repair for a broken tenon. It may actually be stronger than the original tenon.

Troy
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote drawshot:</font><hr> I got a new tip installed yesterday and my Cue tech noticed that I have a small dowel insert in the tenon of my cue underneath the ferulle. I think Predator do the same with a composite material. But what is the dowel for? <hr /></blockquote>

ceebee
01-20-2005, 09:41 AM
I believe an inserted dowel, especially if it is a harder wood than the parent maple shaft, would certainly be harder. Today's adhesives work miracles too.

I have noticed a few times on TV &amp; in person, where the professional player's cues have shorter than normal ferrules. The shorter the tenon, the harder to flex or break.

Any material that cannot flex, even the tiniest bit, is labled as brittle and subject to failure. A material's modulus of elasticity may be the .00005 number out there, but there is a number or it breaks.

Troy
01-20-2005, 11:41 AM
I use hard rock maple to make a replacement tenon.

Troy
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote ceebee:</font><hr> I believe an inserted dowel, especially if it is a harder wood than the parent maple shaft, would certainly be harder. Today's adhesives work miracles too.

I have noticed a few times on TV &amp; in person, where the professional player's cues have shorter than normal ferrules. The shorter the tenon, the harder to flex or break.

Any material that cannot flex, even the tiniest bit, is labled as brittle and subject to failure. A material's modulus of elasticity may be the .00005 number out there, but there is a number or it breaks. <hr /></blockquote>

Cueless Joey
01-20-2005, 12:07 PM
If it's greenish in color, it must be G10 epoxy.