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PQQLK9
01-20-2005, 07:18 PM
http://www.napa.ufl.edu/99news/POOL.htm


"QUIET EYE" IS THE KEY TO MAKING THE SHOT, SAYS UF SPORTS RESEARCHER

June 15, 1999
Writer: Kristin Harmel, kristinh@ufl.edu
Source: Robert Singer, (352) 392-0584
PHOTO AVAILABLE

GAINESVILLE --- When it comes to games such as pool and darts, people with the quietest eyes will play the best, a University of Florida researcher has concluded.

Robert Singer, chairman of UF's department of exercise and sport sciences, and former graduate student Shane Frehlich said a player's key to success lies in the "quiet eye phenomenon," that is, how frequently and for how long a player is able to fixate on a specific location.

The strategy also is useful in golf putting, archery and basketball free throws -- anything that involves focusing on a target and lining up a shot, Singer said.

In their tests, Singer and Frehlich found pool players who had the longest quiet eye duration -- those who focused the longest on meaningful objects such as a cue ball and the target ball -- before shooting were the most successful with their shots, Singer said.

Singer also found that the more experienced and highly skilled players made fewer fixations on the cue ball and target ball than novice players, but each fixation lasted longer.

"The really good pool shooters have learned to focus longer on what they needed to do," Singer said. "They've learned more economical and efficient visual search strategies."

Singer and Frehlich performed their tests with 24 pool players, half of whom were highly skilled and half of whom were casual players. Each was fitted with an infrared eye-tracking system that monitored eye-movement patterns while a player was in the shot-preparation phase -- when the players were positioned over the cue ball until the just-observable movement toward striking the cue ball, when the backswing began.

"People who are attempting to master a target task need to fixate on a relevant cue or cues for a long enough duration," Singer said. "Those who have the ability to control their eye movements by focusing on a certain location are the ones who have the most success."

Bruce Baker, the league and program assistant of the Billiard Congress of America and a head referee for that organization since 1995, said Singer's research may have a big effect on the sport.

"It's just real exciting," Baker said. "Anything we get in these kinds of studies is going to be real significant. We've really never had anybody who's done this before."

The use of a five-step strategy that Singer developed also should improve success rates among pool players, Singer said. The steps, which Singer said can be used with most sports, are: readying, imaging, focusing, executing and evaluating. The readying, or preparatory, state puts the player in the optimal mental/emotional condition. Imaging involves creating an internal picture of the intended act and accomplishment. Focusing attention calls for blocking out internal and external distractions and focusing on the most relevant cue. Executing is the performance of the task with a quiet mind -- "letting it go," and evaluating calls for a player to assess how everything went in order to make improvements in the future, if necessary.

"The five-step strategy for stationary targets emphasizes the focus on a meaningful external cue," Singer said. "The better a player can focus, the fewer the distractions, the better he or she will perform."

Rod
01-20-2005, 08:35 PM
I read about a study a couple of years ago very similar. It showed where advanced players of most sports definatly had quiet eyes before they pulled the trigger. Avg players eyes go all over the place and without a pattern many times. I knew that well before the article from teaching. I happen to be a firm believer of whom ever coined the phrase/term quiet eyes.

Rod

Keith Talent
01-20-2005, 08:50 PM
That's good stuff, Nick.

I have definitely observed this in myself, that if I'm over a difficult shot late in a rack and my confidence is a little off for whatever reason at that moment, that I can feel my eyes jumping back and forth nervously, and it can be a struggle to focus properly before I pull the trigger. Can happen even when my hands are feeling steady, other vital signs dandy.

Have been trying to get this under control, along with 97 other annoying imperfections. /ccboard/images/graemlins/crazy.gif

Barbara
01-20-2005, 09:15 PM
Nick,

Great Post!!

What I found the most important in RandyG's Pool School was the "Eye Pattern Drill". Man!! That explained a lot! Plus, you can use that knowledge watching players when you want to match up with them.

Barbara

randyg
01-20-2005, 09:31 PM
Thanks Barbara, love ya.....SPF-randyg

Rod
01-20-2005, 10:05 PM
Oh yes eyes tell a story. It reminds me of a ladies team I coached for two months before going to Vegas. Eyes are important but manorisums, sp? and body movements say it all. A good hustler or anyone good with reading people knows what to look for. Our last session had little to do with playing pool. It was me giving a speech, what to look for and how to conduct themselves. Playing pool isn't about just making balls. BTW they finished second, I'd never guessed they had so much desire. I was told on the hill game a soft roll before the 8 didn't roll straight. Easy to believe on a bar box in Vegas.

Rod

Cueless Joey
01-20-2005, 10:18 PM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote Barbara:</font><hr> Nick,

Great Post!!

What I found the most important in RandyG's Pool School was the "Eye Pattern Drill". Man!! That explained a lot! Plus, you can use that knowledge watching players when you want to match up with them.

Barbara <hr /></blockquote>
That's evil. /ccboard/images/graemlins/tongue.gif /ccboard/images/graemlins/grin.gif

yegon
01-21-2005, 03:24 AM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote Barbara:</font><hr> Nick,

Great Post!!

What I found the most important in RandyG's Pool School was the "Eye Pattern Drill". Man!! That explained a lot! Plus, you can use that knowledge watching players when you want to match up with them.

Barbara <hr /></blockquote>

how does the drill go? I was trying to set some sort of an eye pattern for me to use yesterday and it was awfull. Everything I tried felt awkward. What pattern do you use? When do you switch from cue ball to the object ball? I tried to do it before the final backswing, during and after the backswing but neither one felt natural. The switching during practice strokes also felt strange. I don't know maybe it was because I was paying attention to it. I would love to settle on one pattern and burn it into my routine but I do not know what to do exactly.

pooltchr
01-21-2005, 05:54 AM
Nick,
Get with me next time you can and we can go over this. Part of the course covers eye patterns. As for the 5 steps, it seems very similar to the ball address, visualization, set, pause, finish, and freeze routine we use.
I have a student Sunday afternoon, but if we finish up early enough, I might try to get by the Green Room for a while.
Steve

DickLeonard
01-21-2005, 06:34 AM
I went to a dentist 50 years ago, who used hypnosis instead of novocaine. You would sit in the chair and on the wall was a picture of a European City with a blackspot on the wall of a house. Now concentrate on that spot, concentrate on that spot,concentrate on that spot. Then the usual this is not going to hurt etc.

After that I used the black spot theory to try to control my eye pattern and calm myself.####

SpiderMan
01-21-2005, 09:41 AM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote DickLeonard:</font><hr> I went to a dentist 50 years ago, who used hypnosis instead of novocaine. You would sit in the chair and on the wall was a picture of a European City with a blackspot on the wall of a house. Now concentrate on that spot, concentrate on that spot,concentrate on that spot. Then the usual this is not going to hurt etc.
<hr /></blockquote>

Did it hurt? Not just surface cavities, did you ever get drilled to the nerve?

SpiderMan

DickLeonard
01-21-2005, 02:29 PM
Spiderman,it didn't hurt but then they were only surface drillings. It did teach me how to do self hypnosis. I do think it hurt the people I played with though. I was in another world then, I would gamble with regular customers 100 no count. Some went to 16 some 25 to win. ####

Stretch
01-21-2005, 04:35 PM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote DickLeonard:</font><hr> I went to a dentist 50 years ago, who used hypnosis instead of novocaine. You would sit in the chair and on the wall was a picture of a European City with a blackspot on the wall of a house. Now concentrate on that spot, concentrate on that spot,concentrate on that spot. Then the usual this is not going to hurt etc.

After that I used the black spot theory to try to control my eye pattern and calm myself.#### <hr /></blockquote>

Hey love the story ####! LOL I hate dentists, but i gotta admit that they've come along way since "look at that black dot on the Europian City" haha....although i once went into a trance when i looked at a black spot on a Europian Woman /ccboard/images/graemlins/smile.gif