PDA

View Full Version : Higher standards/Role Models from Pro players!



preacherman
05-27-2002, 11:28 AM
In the game of pool I'll start with Earl Strickland. I recently saw him in a match against Jim Rempe in Las Vegas. Earl ended up losing. I though it was a great match. During part of the match I sat right behind Earl Strickland. He seems like a miserable, depressed, negative man. I even heard him knocking himself during the game WHEN HE MISSED A SHOT. He is a great player but NOT a model player. I think he needs medical help, spiritual help and PRAYER. I enjoyed watching him in person and up close, but also thought it sad that he seems so miserable and talks so negative (even about himself). I've been taught pool is a mental game and positive thoughts and attitudes are key - YES or No! I say Yes, but yet Earl breaks all these "positive" pool guidelines. What makes him the exception to the rule???? Also, I do think Pool needs to hold high standards of their pro players.

In other sports John McEnroe in my opinion did damage to Tennis and his temper and swearing. He should have banded instead we made him a hero.

In Basketball, Dennis Rodman was a terrible example, with his attitude, unsportsman like conduct, swearing, etc.

In Boxing, Mike Tyson should not be allowed to ever fight.
He is a law breaker, and he says and does some of the most bazzare thing. He doesn't need to be in boxing ring. He needs BIG HELP!

I do hope that we will in Professional sports/pool learn to hold a standard of respect and guidlines, and NOT promote those who are below standard.

Maybe they didn't choose to be role models, but I say that comes with the territory. If you can't accept that then don't go pro!

In closing, we all have flaws, or loss our cool at times, but the above are constantly in such a state. To me that should disqualify them from Professional Sports.

Jim (preacherman)

Rip
05-27-2002, 12:02 PM
Earl is going through some changes in his personal life that many of us have had to deal with. I'm certainly not equipped to judge or make moral character value judgements on Earl or any other person. Are you? Rip~~not preaching, just asking and not needing a response to my rhetorical question.


<blockquote><font class="small">Quote: preacherman:</font><hr> In the game of pool I'll start with Earl Strickland. I recently saw him in a match against Jim Rempe in Las Vegas. Earl ended up losing. I though it was a great match. During part of the match I sat right behind Earl Strickland. He seems like a miserable, depressed, negative man. I even heard him knocking himself during the game WHEN HE MISSED A SHOT. He is a great player but NOT a model player. I think he needs medical help, spiritual help and PRAYER. I enjoyed watching him in person and up close, but also thought it sad that he seems so miserable and talks so negative (even about himself). Jim (preacherman)
<hr></blockquote>

05-27-2002, 02:05 PM
i think yall are just jealous at where he is in his game . if u dont like him, just deal with him.i dont have the attitude he does but ive won 2 tournaments in a row , and people are caractorizing me right now , to me i guess its other peoples part of life , because in their mind they dont want to be the best that they can be , well in my life i try my best at all times therefore everybody can say all they want about me . in all resects to this discussion yes earl has an attitude , and is bellergient at times , but have yall ever thought in his mind he wants to but didnt accomplish what ever made him mad . any way people will be people at all ranges nice or disrespectful. to others thats life who knows . glad to respond to this discussion.

Tom_In_Cincy
05-27-2002, 02:40 PM
Preachman,

Who knows better than Earl, why he does what he does. Your opinions are based on your experiences.

I would think that if you were a 5 time winner of the US Open and on the brink of entering the Pool Hall of Fame, you might feel different than Earl. So, just because he isn't perfect like you, he is to be chided for not meeting your standards?

Preacherman,

Higher Standards/ Role Models are for the parents and NON-sporting figures of the world.

Leave the sports figures out of this discussion.. no one expects these Pros to be anybetter than an average person that earns a lot of money.


For everyone of your 'extremes' for BAD Examples, there are hundered/thousands of sports figures that give back and are admired privately..... just the way they want it.

preacherman
05-27-2002, 05:26 PM
Didn't mean to upset you. I always enjoy reading your feedback. But like it or not, wrong or right, people do look up to sports figures. I do think Earl is a great player as to his talent, that you can not take away from him. But all positions; sports, business, etc., bear a certain level of responsibility with them. And one should consider that when taking on that "area". As for perfect, NO one is perfect. I know I'm not. But I do my best to set an example for those around me. Shouldn't we all try?

I appreciate your valuable input and will continue to learn from your input.

Jim :-)

cheesemouse
05-27-2002, 07:38 PM
Preacherman,
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote:</font><hr>I've been taught pool is a mental game and positive thoughts and attitudes are key- YES or NO! I say Yes, but yet Earl breaks all thse "positive" pool guidelines. What makes him the exception to the rule????<hr></blockquote>

I think when Earl was a beginner he probably was on the well worn path of improvement by postitive re-inforcement but when he reached that mysterious championship level he started to plow new ground, he sets his own guidelines. The population of players who can physically play perfect is immense in the pool world but the population of champions is pretty slim. I can only speculate as to what his mindset is when he has to dig deep to call up his best game, but call it up he does. As a pool player I respect his ability to proform in the moment. I should say lots of moments. No one can deny that when the bell rings Earl has got game. When Earl drops his bucket to the bottom of the well up comes 40 miles of bad road and he wins with it. The outside observer can make his own judgement as to whether Earls actions and deeds are good for the sport. Mr. Congeniality he ain't but then the congeniality award is normally a door prize.

<blockquote><font class="small">Quote:</font><hr>Also, I do think Pool needs to hold high standards of their pro players.<hr></blockquote>

I'm not trying to be flip here but the standards are high. If you miss you lose and there is no need for a governing body of pool to hold the players to that standard. Now if you were refering to pro players behavior then that standard remains with the fickle nature of each tournament director because there are no standards, there is no tour( WPBA excluded) and there is no governing body for the men. In my opinion there never will be.

Tom_In_Cincy
05-27-2002, 07:42 PM
You didn't upset me. You shared your opinion. When you share your opinion with any group, you should expect some some counter viewpoints. This is a healthy thing in any type of forum.

I do believe that all people are different and they have the right to be different.

If you think you are setting a good example by discussing Earl's bad manners, that's your opinion.

If you want to look a little deeper into what Earl is doing, he is setting a very huge example, every time he competes. Watch the way he plays, his stroke, his position play, his table awareness. These are PERFECT examples.

And you expect more out of him? Just because he doesn't do it your way.. doesn't mean he is doing it wrong. Or should have medical or spiritual help.

bigalerickson
05-27-2002, 08:41 PM
When Terry Brands, an NCAA championship wrestler, lost a match his senior year, he walked off the mat, into the locker room and broke four tables and generally through a fit for ten minutes. Nobody stopped him, or scolded him for having a bad temper. He is a kind hearted person, but his mental strength was at such a high level, he was unable to comprehend losing. His mind simply could not handle what it meant to lose.
While Earl suffers, in my opinion, from a similar issue. He plays at such a high level, with such mental intensity that his mind actually is unable to accept a mistake, or a loss.
I'm not condoning his relatively poor sportsmanship, as should be noted, Terry Brands went to the locker room to throw his fit, not in the gymnasium. I simply wish he did not display his frusterations for every potential pool enthusiast to see.

Just some thoughts.

Ralph S.
05-27-2002, 09:07 PM
My personal take on the subject is that because one is an athlete or celebrity automatically does not makes them a role model. Professional basketball player Charles Barkely said it best when he did a commercial several years ago. Role models are parents, teachers, policemen, firefighters, etc. We all make wrong decisions behavioural wise in life. Athletes are no exception. Everyone has that little something that triggers them to be upset. Everyone here has done it at one point in time. That is why we are human. We are not perfect, nor is Earl or any one else.
Ralph S.

preacherman
05-27-2002, 11:00 PM
Thank you for your feedback. I Didn't mean to pick out just Earl, as other sports I memntioned have similar battles with their players. I guess I would like to see
the role models in whatever the field. I strive for that,
and humbly believe God keep me from getting off track. My call now is NOT to DOOM Earl put to pray for him.

Chris, please keep in touch as I really like your insite into so many questions.

God bless ya,
Jim (jjMazzu@bellsouth.net)

Cueless Joey
05-28-2002, 12:33 AM
I wonder what would happen to WPBA/J Lee if Jeanete started behaving like Earl. Screaming on top of her voice like a 3 yr. old, pointing a finger an opponent's face, berate Jennifer Chen because she speaks limited English, or asking why the audience is cheering for a foreign player or if she walked out of a finals because she didn't like where the rack was being spotted.

Rich R.
05-28-2002, 05:04 AM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote: bigalerickson:</font><hr> When Terry Brands, an NCAA championship wrestler, lost a match his senior year, he walked off the mat, into the locker room and broke four tables and generally through a fit for ten minutes. Nobody stopped him, or scolded him for having a bad temper. He is a kind hearted person, but his mental strength was at such a high level, he was unable to comprehend losing. His mind simply could not handle what it meant to lose.
<hr></blockquote>
I'm sorry Al, but I do not consider that mental strength. IMO, that is more of an example of mental weakness.
JMHO. Rich R.

bigalerickson
05-28-2002, 10:32 AM
I don't mean for what I said to be construed as mental strength. I am simply saying that because his mind was so poinantly focused on winning, he along with his mind was unable to handle a loss. A man needs to be able to lose, everyone loses at something at some point in their life.

heater451
05-28-2002, 11:26 AM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote: Ralph S.:</font><hr> My personal take on the subject is that because one is an athlete or celebrity automatically does not makes them a role model. . . .<hr></blockquote>

Ralph, I understand where you're coming from, but I think this is one of those "in the real world" things. . . .

No one has "role model" bestowed upon them like a title. I they are in the public eye, then there are those who will want to pattern themselves after them, which makes them de facto role models.

Now, whether we as a polite society should/could force these "backdoor" role models to behave themselves is another issue in its entirety, although I would think there would be some behavioral rules set for sanctioned tournaments. These would be punishable, as the governing body decides.

(Sidenote: Since pool isn't such a huge specator sport, I don't know if we really have to worry about anyone following a bad example. And, I certainly don't believe that there are many young folks, aching to "be like Earl",as they do that "Mike" from basketball. . . .)

Chris Cass
05-28-2002, 11:53 AM
Hi Jim,

I assume you meant me. This may not be the answer your looking for my friend but here goes. The world we live in today is a stressful one. For freedom people have stood united to fight for freedom. They've stood alone in front of tanks, unprotected with there body to stand for what they believe in. They've set themselves on fire and also blew themselves up killing thousands.

It's hard to say what goes through the minds people but ones things certain, they believe it's right. I believe if there were no police or government officials or laws. We as people would revert to the strong win. The world today isn't far from those days.

The USA's people and I'm one was taught from the beginning of life to fight and to compete to win. We take are sports to the highest competitve levels. Even fans will riot for the sports they believe in. Soccer for one has caused rioting in other countries too.

Earl Strickland's life and job is to play pool. If you think his demands on the equipment is heavy. That doesn't hold a candle to the demands he has on his own self. He practices most likely 6-8 hrs a day. He does this not only for the passion he has for the game but it's his paycheck.

The mannorisms(sp?) in pool can be harsh, no doubt. The main thing is he believes he can do better. Away from the competition Earl is very polite, I talked with him in Vegas. As far as the downing comments directed at himself. I've been known to do that myself. It's to bring out the fighter in him.

As far as pool goes, once you can accept your game, your done. You strive to become better every time you play. In the public eye he looks bad. That's just some individuals. All competitors outside the public eye do and say the same things, when you put all you have into this game.

I don't know one pool player that started young that hasn't broken a stick. I too am guilty, I was only 17 when I broke my first stick. I wasn't even losing. I was mentally disraught over the way I was playing. Sometimes even now I want to smash my cue. Funny thing, the public's perception is the last thing on my mind.LOL The hardest part to deal with is your mind and body. Telling the body to do something and the body not responding the way you want it too. What's worse is the equipment not responding as the mind percieves it to.

As pool's popularity rises and the sport we love get's financially where it should be, people will tone down more. They'll be fines and harsh penalties imposed. That's when things will change. The BCA has such things however they might not enforce them much now. It's a start though.


I'm sure this doesn't help but it's the heart and where it's at that really counts. Ask yourself, does Earl really deserve to be banned from the sport? I think an occasional fine would be in order. After all it's not the sport suffering, it's Earl that's suffering.IMHO

Regards,

C.C.

Rich R.
05-28-2002, 11:57 AM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote: bigalerickson:</font><hr> I don't mean for what I said to be construed as mental strength. I am simply saying that because his mind was so poinantly focused on winning, he along with his mind was unable to handle a loss. A man needs to be able to lose, everyone loses at something at some point in their life. <hr></blockquote>
Thanks for clarifying that Al. Rich R.