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View Full Version : Replacing ferrules



poolturtle
02-01-2005, 12:21 PM
I broke the tip off a cue, but I need to replace the ferrule also. I don't want to break the cue trying to force it off. What's the best way to remove one? You'd think after 6 years of playing I'd know by now. /ccboard/images/graemlins/tongue.gif Thanks for any help.

Cueless Joey
02-01-2005, 12:27 PM
Take it to a repair person.
You can't do it yourself w/out proper tooling and equipment.

Fred Agnir
02-01-2005, 12:28 PM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote poolturtle:</font><hr> I broke the tip off a cue, but I need to replace the ferrule also. I don't want to break the cue trying to force it off. What's the best way to remove one? You'd think after 6 years of playing I'd know by now. /ccboard/images/graemlins/tongue.gif Thanks for any help. <hr /></blockquote>Bring it to a cue repair person.

Fred

poolturtle
02-01-2005, 12:42 PM
just out of curiosity, what are the "proper tools or equipment?

Cueless Joey
02-01-2005, 01:17 PM
A lathe is needed.
If you like your ferrules threaded, a thread grinder is best. Compression dies also are used. I like grinding mine b/c it is so much cleaner and does not tear wood.
File and sandpaper are also used.

Fred Agnir
02-01-2005, 01:19 PM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote poolturtle:</font><hr> just out of curiosity, what are the "proper tools or equipment? <hr /></blockquote>A lathe, for starters.

Fred

poolturtle
02-01-2005, 02:03 PM
Thanks. I think I'll find a cue repair person. I don't have a lathe, and I have a feeling if I did, I would find a way to turn a good cue into a very expensive toothpick. /ccboard/images/graemlins/shocked.gif

ras314
02-01-2005, 07:26 PM
I have the same question, and expect to get a small lathe soon. I made the mistake of offering to "retip" all the local bars messed up cues. Turns out there must be 50 or more of the things, some with cracked ferrules. After checking the cost of Valley cues it seems buying new ones might be a better approach, probably why they have so many on hand.

I would like to know if non threaded cheap ferrules are useable on bar cues? Also any source of info on what is necessary to do this.

One day I'll learn to keep my mouth shut.

Troy
02-01-2005, 08:21 PM
Smart choice...
I cut the old ferrule off using a lathe and replace with either a threaded or non-threaded ferrule (depending on the customer's choice and what was there before). Obviously, the new ferrule is then sized to the shaft on the lathe and a new tip installed.
Either style ferrule will be just fine, if installed properly.

Troy
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote poolturtle:</font><hr> Thanks. I think I'll find a cue repair person. I don't have a lathe, and I have a feeling if I did, I would find a way to turn a good cue into a very expensive toothpick. /ccboard/images/graemlins/shocked.gif <hr /></blockquote>

poolturtle
02-02-2005, 09:34 AM
roughly how much will this cost, and any suggestions as to instructional material to learn how in case I ever do get a lathe?

SpiderMan
02-02-2005, 09:40 AM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote poolturtle:</font><hr> roughly how much will this cost, and any suggestions as to instructional material to learn how in case I ever do get a lathe? <hr /></blockquote>

Cost varies by region and competition. Around here, $30 for a ferrule and single-layer tip is reasonable. I don't personally like to mess with them for that price, you never know what you'll find underneath the ferrule.

If you have no prior machinist experience, start out with the book "How To Run a Lathe". You'll need to do a search for that title. Go to the library and look at back issues of "Home Shop Machinist". Hang out with people who are hobbyists. Participate in the newsgroup "rec.crafts.metalworking". All this assumes you are buying a conventional metalworking lathe (recommended). If you buy a limited-purpose "cue lathe", it should come with instructions and perhaps a video.

SpiderMan

Troy
02-02-2005, 08:07 PM
I charge $20 for a ferrule replacement which includes a "basic" tip (Le Pro or Elk Master). For just the tip replacement, it's $10, so I guess I'm under-charging for the ferrule.

I learned from a local cue maker who was tired of doing repairs and turned them over to me.

Troy
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote poolturtle:</font><hr> roughly how much will this cost, and any suggestions as to instructional material to learn how in case I ever do get a lathe? <hr /></blockquote>

Cueless Joey
02-02-2005, 10:13 PM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote ras314:</font><hr> I have the same question, and expect to get a small lathe soon. I made the mistake of offering to "retip" all the local bars messed up cues. Turns out there must be 50 or more of the things, some with cracked ferrules. After checking the cost of Valley cues it seems buying new ones might be a better approach, probably why they have so many on hand.

I would like to know if non threaded cheap ferrules are useable on bar cues? Also any source of info on what is necessary to do this.

One day I'll learn to keep my mouth shut. <hr /></blockquote>
Most house cues I've come across have uncapped and press-fitted fiber ferrules.
A small lathe will do as long as it has big enough spindle hole ( preferable 1 3/8) but you will need a steady rest or rear chuck to hold the handle area down because it wobbles a ton.

ras314
02-03-2005, 10:57 AM
I am getting the Cue Companion from Unique Products,Inc. rather than trying to find a metal lathe with a big enough spindle hole. I've noticed a few of these house cues have very good shaft wood which ought to be well seasoned by now so I'll just keep a few for my time. Should make good sneaky petes. The ferrules appear to be glued on with a "glue hole" rather than a caped type and smooth rather than threaded.

Cueless Joey
02-03-2005, 12:07 PM
Good going.

Troy
02-03-2005, 08:00 PM
Every house cue I've seen have are "slip &amp; glue" without a cap rather than the threaded variety with a cap.

Troy
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote ras314:</font><hr> I am getting the Cue Companion from Unique Products,Inc. rather than trying to find a metal lathe with a big enough spindle hole. I've noticed a few of these house cues have very good shaft wood which ought to be well seasoned by now so I'll just keep a few for my time. Should make good sneaky petes. The ferrules appear to be glued on with a "glue hole" rather than a caped type and smooth rather than threaded. <hr /></blockquote>