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Billy_Bob
02-11-2005, 10:27 AM
I've taken a few classes which were "learning how to learn". One was learning how to use the library. Another was learning how to learn from a book.

These classes were the most worthwhile classes I have ever attended and have helped me throughout my life.

So what is the best way to learn from instructional pool videos?

I suppose watching them like a movie would not do much for your game.

What I am currently doing is watching a lesson in the video, hitting pause, taking notes about the lesson, rewinding and watching the lesson again if I don't understand, then using my notes to add what was discussed in the lesson to my practice sheet.

And if the lesson is a shot which can't be described in words, I make a diagram of the shot and place it on my wall. Then in my practice sheet, I say to practice "such and so" shot diagramed on the wall.

Anyone else have suggestions about learning from videos?

loofnicnad
02-11-2005, 10:41 AM
Billy_Bob,

I am making an assumtion that you have a table in your home. Is your TV within sight of the table. You could gain a more immediate impression of what you are seeing on the video by setting it up and "follow along" with the video. Pausing and rewinding to check your result against the result on the tape. Resetting the shot until you and the video have the same results.

Billy_Bob
02-11-2005, 11:00 AM
Yes I have my own table with a VCR/DVD and TV in the room.

The thing is I have my practice broken down into different areas for different days. Say draw, follow shots one day, position the next, etc.

I will be practicing things from 12 different DVD's, so it could take forever to hunt down the shots on the various DVD's.

How about practicing the shots from the video when I first watch it, then making notes/diagrams, etc?

I also practice shots from the "99 critical shots" book, but it is quick to turn to the page I reference on my practice sheet and find the shot.

Maybe instructional pool videos would be more helpful for practice if they had an index to shots by name and number, and you could go right to the shot you want to practice?

Or a "supplemental CD" which cuts out all the talk and just has shots by number, you select the number/shot and you immediately see the shot???

Billy_Bob
02-11-2005, 11:21 AM
Actually, come to think about it, instructional pool videos are not designed with practice in mind.

Maybe someone should produce a "practice video" which takes you through each thing to practice, and comes with a practice booklet which has each shot diagramed (booklet would go in same order as video).

There are too many things to practice in one day, so broken down into day of week. FYI - Here is my practice schedule...

Monday - Bridge, Stance, Grip, Stroke, Speed control, Draw, Follow, Stun, Jump Shots

Tuesday - Position, Tangent, Scratch, Throw, Timed Shots

Wednesday - Kick, Safety Shots

Thursday - Aiming, Carom, Cluster, Combination Shots

Friday - Cut, Nip, Misc. shots
(Misc. shots are left-handed, one-handed, mechanical bridge.)

Saturday - Straight, Massť shots

Sunday - Frozen balls, Bank Shots, Break Shots

Bob_Jewett
02-11-2005, 11:36 AM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote Billy_Bob:</font><hr> Actually, come to think about it, instructional pool videos are not designed with practice in mind.
... <hr /></blockquote>

I'd say that Byrne's Volume V tape is an instructional tape and it's pretty much all drills. Here is an old post from rec.sport.billiard.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

Contents of Byrne's "Power Pool Workout" (not entirely in order)

As drills:
checking basic follow through with center and side
the "over the spots" drill
kicking cross side with precise spin
straight in shot with tape on the table, then w/o tape
cut shot along the short rail as progressive practice (PP)
cut shot off the spot as PP
two cuts and a bank shot as PP
cross side bank as PP
multi-speed lags (1-2-3-4 rails)
jawed object ball, get to center, then to end of table, each two ways
follow to end rail, then to targets as PP
stop shot as PP
stop with an angle
"stun run through" as PP, also safety demo
draw drill as PP, draw distance as the variable
Mosconi's "ring around the side" as PP with increasing balls
The ten-shot position drill from Byrne's "SBoP&amp;B"
DelaVeau's "15-ball soft shot" drill (in a 3x5 grid to start)

Also in the tape:
misc suggestions
intro to PP
Bank w/english demo
Bank w/follow demo
max draw/follow demo -- stripe w/chalk spot ala Shepard and Onoda
Elephant training balls demo
line up pool (old but interesting game) demo
demo of the "hooked" game

loofnicnad
02-11-2005, 12:46 PM
I see your dilemma a little better now.
I would include in your notes the location on the DVD for each exercise that you want to practice. Hopefully they all have some sort of scene selection feature off of the DVD menu screen. It's not much but it should help you relocate what you want a little faster.

daviddjmp
02-11-2005, 02:12 PM
I watch my Accu-Stats 14.1 videos over and over again. Watching the best players (Varner, Sigel, Rempe, Soquet, Zuglan) control that cueball and improvise when they miss position really helps. The techniques they use have started slowly to sink in, I am beginning to recognize some of the things I have learned when I am playing and apply them. It is a long but very enjoyable process.

dmgwalsh
02-13-2005, 06:03 AM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote daviddjmp:</font><hr> I watch my Accu-Stats 14.1 videos over and over again. Watching the best players (Varner, Sigel, Rempe, Soquet, Zuglan) control that cueball and improvise when they miss position really helps. The techniques they use have started slowly to sink in, I am beginning to recognize some of the things I have learned when I am playing and apply them. It is a long but very enjoyable process. <hr /></blockquote>

David- I too opt for the osmosis method at times. In straight, a lot of it is making the right decisions and understanding exactly where you need to put the cue ball, especially at the end of the rack. Hopefully, you already know how to execute the shots.

Sometimes, if I see something interesting, I'll pause the tape, set up the shot and try it until I get it down. This is usually when someone has got out of line and they are doing an interesting recovery shot that I think I might need to use.

Dennis