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View Full Version : 14.1 Best teacher of all games?



dutchboy
02-24-2005, 03:13 PM
I've heard over and over again that straight pool is the best game to practice to inform all the others. Hopkins, Archer, Sigel and Mosconi have said the skills learned playing 14.1 will enhance your ability to play nine-ball or eight ball or one-pocket. Weight in on this for me. What skills are honed in straight pool that better you at all the others? I get to see Sansoucci play now and then and he occasionally knocks off some racks of straight in a world that seems to be playing nothing but nine-ball. He's amazing to watch. Anyway...what do you all think?

Barbara
02-24-2005, 03:41 PM
Yes, 14.1 is the best game to work on to improve your skills in all the other games.

When he was alive (RIP), Jimmy Caras used to always tell me to stop practicing 9-ball and play 14.1. And when I practiced at 14.1, I played better and less "sporty" at 9-ball.

Barbara

nail
02-24-2005, 06:29 PM
Dutchboy:

I tend to agree that 14.1 requires the most discipline and knowledge out of the more popular games of pocket billiards such as 8-ball and 9-ball. Because 9-ball is the most popular on TV, I will use it for a comparison to straight pool:

Safety play: In 9-ball, you have to keep your opponent from hitting, or pocketing, one particular ball. In Straight Pool you have to stop your opponent from pocketing any ball.

Position play: Although you often have to play long distance position in 9-ball, you generally have a much larger landing zone for the cue ball (up to a foot or more) and still have an angle for your next shot. In Straight Pool, you strive for the least amount of cue ball movement, often requiring you to have pinpoint position within a fraction of an inch. A delicate touch with the cue is as important as letting your stroke out.

Knowledge: Please donít take offense to this, but compared to Straight Pool, 9-ball is a "no-brainer" game. 9-ball players generally only think 2 or 3 balls ahead, unless thereís a cluster to deal with. In Straight Pool you have different variations and styles of pattern play, often involving 5 balls or more. You have a break ball to deal with. You have a key ball to position yourself for the break ball to deal with. If you donít have a break ball or key ball already in position, you often have to manufacture them by bumping balls into position. You have more traffic on the table (15 versus 9 balls). You have more combination shots. You have clusters coming out the wazzoo. The list goes on and on.

Having said this I want you to know that I respect all billiard games, especially when they're played well. I just think that straight pool requires the most over-all skill, and because of this, it should help you with all the other games IMO. If you'd like to read a great book on 14.1, get the Straight Pool Bible by "Babe" Cranfield and Larry Moy. It's an easy read and will show you how to get the most out of your game.

JimS
02-24-2005, 08:25 PM
Nice post. I'm glad I spent my time reading it. /ccboard/images/graemlins/cool.gif

MrLucky
02-24-2005, 09:49 PM
Excellent analogies ! <font color="purple">Straight pool when played properly is the absolute complete Pool Challenge! </font color> /ccboard/images/graemlins/grin.gif

daviddjmp
02-25-2005, 01:33 AM
nail-

Well said, Sir-

Wally_in_Cincy
02-25-2005, 07:56 AM
I agree with what nail wrote. But there is one drawback to 14.1. Generally you don't bank very many balls in a match. If you are playing the game right you won't bank any balls. In 8-ball, 9-ball, and obviously 1P, you need to know how to bank.

Having said that, if you are an bar table 8-ball player, the best thing you can do for your game is play 14.1 because of how it teaches you how to break clusters.

IMO

Wally &lt;~~ broke some clusters this week.

roscoe
02-26-2005, 01:29 PM
I believe if 9 ball is played properly you should not have to bank a ball either.

One pocket...sure....bank pool...obviously..but not 9 ball.
Roscoe

MrLucky
02-26-2005, 08:03 PM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote Wally_in_Cincy:</font><hr> I agree with what nail wrote. But there is one drawback to 14.1. Generally you don't bank very many balls in a match. If you are playing the game right you won't bank any balls. In 8-ball, 9-ball, and obviously 1P, you need to know how to bank.

Having said that, if you are an bar table 8-ball player, the best thing you can do for your game is play 14.1 because of how it teaches you how to break clusters.

IMO

Wally &lt;~~ broke some clusters this week. <hr /></blockquote> <font color="red"> Agreed! actually I never looked at it that way as far as the banking! Banking up to recently was a big weak area in my game when it came to bar pool and APA 8 ball I would rather cut balls then bank them a very good player in Atlanta named Dooley picked up on it and worked with me on my banks and it has made a world of difference for me ! I began and learned the game on straight. </font color> /ccboard/images/graemlins/smile.gif

ChuckR
02-27-2005, 09:27 AM
I was all set to spend the next 30 minutes addressing the points that you covered so nicely. Thanks for the extra time today, I think I'll go use it on the table working on my straight game. ChuckR

Chris Cass
02-27-2005, 04:40 PM
Hi Nail,

Not to mention that in straight pool it allows you more time to get into the zone. Your more apt to getting there playing 14.1 than any other game played. That helps tremendously in all the other games when time is short and getting the table speed down.

Regards,

C.C.~~imho /ccboard/images/graemlins/grin.gif