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View Full Version : Question for all those who own pool tables



anarchist
03-02-2005, 04:55 PM
Hello all, wondering if I could get some advice from those who are lucky enough to own a pool table. I've been contemplating buying one for my garage. It's large enough for a full 9', but that would be it as far as any left over room.

My main question is, would I have to also consider converting the garage into an extra room to maintain the temperature? This would be pretty expensive, and I'm hoping that a table would be okay out there. Any suggestions would be appreciated.

ChuckR
03-02-2005, 06:47 PM
I have played on tables with temps ranging from about 50 degrees up to about 85 degrees. I would think the temps would have to be kept in a range comfortable to the players but the thing that would drive me nuts would be high humidity where it is very difficult to work the cue ball such as draw shots. Another thing that will happen is that the rubber in the rails can deteriorate quickly with temp. extreems. I don't think I would want the table without any ability to control the environment. ChuckR

ras314
03-02-2005, 07:02 PM
Good luck on finding info on what temp and humidity to manitain. On mine I keep the humidity from 35 to 50% RH and the temp from 45 to 80 deg year around, with fairly inexpensive equipment. Depends on your climate and how good your insulation is. I would not blow 4 large for a good table without remodeling a garage.

FastJoey
03-02-2005, 09:18 PM
i recently remodeled an enclosed porch 25 year old add on to our home..it was always a plant/garden area ..i put in a new Olhausen Augusta 9 foot table...you can insulate the walls doors ect.with a product called reflectix.it is aluminum foil on both sides with 2 layers of air bubbles in between..it reflects heat back into the room...then you can put plastic down and find a new rug remnant and pad for the floor..panel over the reflectix(just to give u an idea).. reflectix is found at Menards in the building materials dept...as far as heat goes If the garage is attached you can run heat and return lines to the garage from your existing furnace duct work...i did not need to add a wall furnace to my addition as i ran new duct work out there...i live in the Chicago area where it gets pretty cold....if you do need another furnace for your garage you can get a NO vent garage/wall mounted furnace..these are about $150.00 at Menards...i would put new heat ducts into the garage and try that for a season before deciding on a furnace...all of the above is fairly easy to do by yourself..my temp.in my house is set at 72 degrees in my pool room it is about 62..i enjoy the cooler temp..and everybody that has played here so far likes it also...you stay warm moving around anyway.also my pool room has 6- six foot glass patio doors ..one is the entrance from my house..on the glass doors we put cheap leather pull curtains..as you do not want sunlight reflecting off the balls...use your imagination and that garage will be a great pool room for you..good luck and you must let us know what you decide and tell us about your project....

FastJoey
03-03-2005, 12:53 AM
the newer tables have better finishes that protect them..check Olhausen's warranty on their site.....if you have a humidity problem just use a portable dehumidifier.......you would not want an unheated garage to where temps.could get to freezing or below..because that would cause moisture on the table.....

LARRY_BOY
03-03-2005, 03:52 AM
Wouldn't even think of leaving the table in a uncontroled temperature room......

DickLeonard
03-03-2005, 08:28 AM
To much moisture/heat dif/ leads to swelling and contracting of the woods and then the table goes out of level. The table usually goes into the spot on both sides of the table.Then you have to get an antique expert to show you how to accomplish that. ####

MrLucky
03-03-2005, 10:11 AM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote anarchist:</font><hr> Hello all, wondering if I could get some advice from those who are lucky enough to own a pool table. I've been contemplating buying one for my garage. It's large enough for a full 9', but that would be it as far as any left over room.

My main question is, would I have to also consider converting the garage into an extra room to maintain the temperature? This would be pretty expensive, and I'm hoping that a table would be okay out there. Any suggestions would be appreciated. <hr /></blockquote> <font color="red">First of all, Where do you live? if you are in Phoenix for instance the humidity and cold isn't as much of a factor! If you live in Anchorag, you may have other issues to LOL! contend with besides the table! </font color> /ccboard/images/graemlins/grin.gif

FastJoey
03-03-2005, 05:29 PM
i totally agree...the poster should tell us what state he is in ..that would be the most important thing to deal with then........

Cane
03-03-2005, 06:00 PM
I had a pool table in a garage once, and ended up spending more insulating the walls &amp; ceiling and having air handling ducts put in it than I spent on the table... and it wasn't a cheap table!

Here, in Eastern Oklahoma, temp and humidity can be major factors. We consider it a "dry" day when the humidity is under 50%. Ever seen a cue ball leave a Rooster Tail as it rolls across the cloth? /ccboard/images/graemlins/smirk.gif I live in what they call the Arkansas River Valley. The humidity here gets a little out of hand and the temps here will range from the teens &amp; lower in the winter to over 100 in July and August, with the nice summer muggy air creeping up over 90 Relative Humidity... You can drown if you take a deep breath outside...

If you live in a more temperate climate, temperature and humidity control may not be as much of an issue as it is for many of us.

Later,
Bob

anarchist
03-03-2005, 08:11 PM
Thanks everyone for the replies so far. Much appreciated.

I live in north Florida, close to Jacksonville. The weather here is usually nice, and humidity can be a problem, but I guess I've grown use to it. Rarely does the winter's get extremely cold, and I believe the lowest it went this past year was 24, and about 28 two or three times.

Our garage is insulated (with the exception of the door). I've thought about having the ventilation redone to control the heat and cold. Never really thought about the humidity though.

The main problem I face is that I cannot remove the garage door and reseal into a wall per our home owner's agreement. I am not planning to create a whole entire room, just something I can place a table in.

Is my only choice to have the garage redone into an additional room?

FastJoey
03-03-2005, 09:02 PM
just an idea for the garage door use that Reflectix i mentioned ...staple it over the door so it is sealed ..then put some drapes or cloth over it to cover it..then nothing will be permanent per your home owners agreement........ keep asking questions and getting ideas................

Chris Cass
03-04-2005, 02:40 AM
Hi anarchist,

You could also buy the small portable humidifiers or dehumidifiers to help out. As long as it's reletivally comfortable for you and the table I think you can get away with some of the problems without making a ton of work.

Regards,

C.C.~~never had a garage big enough to hold a table.

bsmutz
03-04-2005, 01:00 PM
I have my table in the garage, insulated except for the door. I put a pad and carpet down and put the table on top. If I had it to do over again, I would probably cut out the locations where the legs sit to eliminate the additional settling. I live in Washington, just across the river from Portland, OR. During the winter, I leave a space heater on set at 64 degrees. It cost about $40 at Lowe's. It keeps the temp up above 50 even in the coldest weather. When I want to play, I have another space heater that I turn on and I turn the other one up to 74. It gets warm enough to play within an hour if it is below 50 outside and is ready to go immediately if it is above 50 outside. It really doesn't take too much to heat up. Having the floor covered probably helps quite a bit, plus it's a lot easier on the body if you are going to play for long periods of time.