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ChuckR
03-06-2005, 08:54 AM
I have been experimenting with a new technique and was wondering if anyone else has tried this. When you execute a shot, you allow the cue to slide freely in your grip rather than holding on and following thru. You still get follow thru, but it seems to be much straighter than when you maintain your grip and push thru with your hand. I think I'll keep playing with it and see where it leads to. ChuckR

MrLucky
03-06-2005, 08:56 AM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote ChuckR:</font><hr> I have been experimenting with a new technique and was wondering if anyone else has tried this. When you execute a shot, you allow the cue to slide freely in your grip rather than holding on and following thru. You still get follow thru, but it seems to be much straighter than when you maintain your grip and push thru with your hand. I think I'll keep playing with it and see where it leads to. ChuckR <hr /></blockquote> /ccboard/images/graemlins/confused.gif

PQQLK9
03-06-2005, 09:01 AM
I think that you are describing the classic "Slip Stroke". It takes a little getting used to but it works. Preacher Don Fenney covers that technique throughly in one of his videos.

Cane
03-06-2005, 09:38 AM
The slip stroke is a great tool for teaching you not to overgrip the cue. I don't use it in competitive play, but I do use it in practice, and it does help burn in the "loose grip" so I don't tighten up on on the cue in play.

Later,
Bob

DickLeonard
03-06-2005, 10:20 AM
PoolK9 I think he is describing Irving Cranes releasing the cue near impact and catching the cue with ring and baby finger as opposed to Mosconis slip stroke. ####

DickLeonard
03-06-2005, 10:25 AM
Chuck my grip #2 allows the cue to be released and sent in a straight line.####

MrLucky
03-06-2005, 10:26 AM
Thanks for explaining this! I have heard of this technique just never tried it ! it seems or at least sounds like it could also cause problems to me!

JohnnyP
03-06-2005, 02:10 PM
That's releasing the cue, which is not the same as slipstroking.

In a slipstroke, the grip hand moves a couple inches towards the butt during the final backstroke.

Not sure of the purpose, but it would seem to alter the timing of the hit.

I have a problem hitting the ball late, as the stick is decelerating. I doubt that's the reason Mosconi used it.

DickLeonard
03-06-2005, 04:47 PM
Deeman said this was the best explaination he had ever heard. When your cue is next to the cueball before your practice strokes this places in your mind where the cueball is, then when your hand gets back to that spot your mind tells you where the hit spot is and you veer off. By slipping back 2 or 3 inches on the delivery when the hit impulse comes your cue has hit the cueball and it is safely
on the way. ####

ChuckR
03-06-2005, 04:49 PM
You guys are correct in that I am not talking about a slip stroke. I have never been able to master that one. I am talking about letting the cue slide thru your grip hand at and after contact. You can use a conventional grip or the #2 system that Dick Leonard has described in his post on new delivery systems. I was not aware that Crane let the cue slide during delivery. Thanks for the input. ChuckR

SpiderMan
03-07-2005, 08:53 AM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote DickLeonard:</font><hr> Deeman said this was the best explaination he had ever heard. When your cue is next to the cueball before your practice strokes this places in your mind where the cueball is, then when your hand gets back to that spot your mind tells you where the hit spot is and you veer off. By slipping back 2 or 3 inches on the delivery when the hit impulse comes your cue has hit the cueball and it is safely
on the way. #### <hr /></blockquote>

I assume that you mean that the cue has slipped forward during the "final" delivery, ie the grip hand has slipped further back? That seems like it could help if the shooter has a tendency to decelerate his stroke (I find I do that sometimes), but wouldn't it also tend to reduce the precise control? It seems like it would be tough to get the grip to slip the same amount every time so that it becomes very consistent. Wouldn't this affect my ability to, for example, draw back exactly 3 inches on a short, soft shot?

SpiderMan

DickLeonard
03-07-2005, 09:20 AM
Spiderman on short drawback shots it is a practiced release shot that takes time to get the hang of. You throw the cue and imediately catch it and then pull the cue backwards out of the way of the cueball. I guess you would call it an in and out stroke.####