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View Full Version : Suggestion to get my game up another level



RottingMindz
03-08-2005, 07:51 PM
I have been playing pool for about 5 months, and I am happily addicted. Recently I bought a new cue and decided that I want to be more serious. I want to start practicing and doing drills, and getting my game to another level, not just "playing" pool as in having fun with friends.
Right now, I do have a decent stroke (the cue through bottle thing is rather effortless), my aim is rather well also, be it tough cut shots, large angles, etc. However, there is a pretty bad consistency problem, oftentimes I make seemingly stupid mistakes and miss ridiculously. Some days I can run the table with ease, and some other days I have hard times making 2-ball runs, as if I forgot how to aim.
Position play is where I have the most problems, I do pay a lot of attention to positions, and I can do simple positioning involving follow, draw, and stop, however I'm not good with sidespins AT ALL. While I know the effects of side English on the CB, I do not know how to compensate my aim, or the effect of throw, deflection, etc.
If anyone has any suggestion on how I can improve and what kind of drills I can do, it would be a great help for me, thank you!
BTW, how is my progress judging from how long I have played?

JimS
03-08-2005, 08:08 PM
See a teacher before you go any further. It's the only thing that makes sense. Do it now and save yourself the pain of a slow learning curve trying to learn to play on your own. It's worth every cent you'll invest. Do it!

recoveryjones
03-09-2005, 12:51 AM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote JimS:</font><hr> See a teacher before you go any further. It's the only thing that makes sense. Do it now and save yourself the pain of a slow learning curve trying to learn to play on your own. It's worth every cent you'll invest. Do it! <hr /></blockquote>

Good advice Jim. Here's my suggestions:

1.Get proffesional instruction as soon as possible.

(without proper fundamentals and a straight stroke you won't be hitting the cueball where you think you are and it will lead to inconsistent play.

2.Practice the fundamentals till they become second nature, including a consistent pre-shot routine.

3.Read pool books, perhaps some videos and accustat matches for educational purposes.A lot of stuff thats in books and on videos was top secret stuff a few years ago. If you look hard enough you will find that there aren't too many secrets left.

4.Practice, practice, practice, including drills that include ALL faucets of the game.

5.Play and watch the best players possible to put pressure on your stroke.Don't go after the very top guys or you'll get really good at racking balls and you need to shoot.Allways keep moving up with quality competition levels as you improve.Beating "Freddie the fish" will swell your ego,however, won't improve your game. Also enter some handicap tourneys and later on some small money games asking for a reasonable spot, if you so wish.

6. Return for tune up lessons and practice , practice practice.

7. practice practice practice, especially the parts of your game you're the weakest at.Strive to make the weakest part of your game your strength.


Going from a C+ to an A is definitly achievable in a few years with some dedication(proper fundamentals) and certainly possible as long as you weren't born with two left arms.

If you want to go from an A to a pro, drop everything else you are doing and give your whole life to pool....LOL

Wishing you fine success, RJ

ps. Make sure your cue isn't warped and have someone who knows what they are doing either shape your tip for you or have them make sure you are shaping it properly. A well shaped quality tip is vitaly important and musn't be ignored.

pss. Don't ignore step one.

pooltchr
03-09-2005, 05:20 AM
go to www.bca-pool.com/play/ (http://www.bca-pool.com/play/) and select INSTRUCTION. You will find two lists of instructors listed by the state where they live. Check both the Active and Reserve lists. Both lists have well qualified instructors who can make sure you are working on the right things.
Good luck in your journey!
Steve

Brian in VA
03-09-2005, 07:18 AM
As the others have said, there is nothing that beats a quality instructor. The lesson I took last fall from Scott Lee, my first pool lesson ever, has jumped my game dramatically. And I'm one of those people who only practices one hour a week (at lunch) and plays one night a week of league. I can't wait until I get my own table and can dedicate myself to improving.

The money you spend on lessons, will provide a huge payback. Just make sure you take the proper mental state into the lesson. Your mind set should be, I know little to nothing about this game and this person knows everything comparatively. I'm going to commit to trying everything they tell me and ingrain it into my routines.

Good luck!
Brian in VA

dr_dave
03-09-2005, 09:54 AM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote recoveryjones:</font><hr> <blockquote><font class="small">Quote JimS:</font><hr> See a teacher before you go any further. It's the only thing that makes sense. Do it now and save yourself the pain of a slow learning curve trying to learn to play on your own. It's worth every cent you'll invest. Do it! <hr /></blockquote>

Good advice Jim. Here's my suggestions:

1.Get proffesional instruction as soon as possible.

(without proper fundamentals and a straight stroke you won't be hitting the cueball where you think you are and it will lead to inconsistent play.

2.Practice the fundamentals till they become second nature, including a consistent pre-shot routine.

3.Read pool books, perhaps some videos and accustat matches for educational purposes.A lot of stuff thats in books and on videos was top secret stuff a few years ago. If you look hard enough you will find that there aren't too many secrets left.

4.Practice, practice, practice, including drills that include ALL faucets of the game.

5.Play and watch the best players possible to put pressure on your stroke.Don't go after the very top guys or you'll get really good at racking balls and you need to shoot.Allways keep moving up with quality competition levels as you improve.Beating "Freddie the fish" will swell your ego,however, won't improve your game. Also enter some handicap tourneys and later on some small money games asking for a reasonable spot, if you so wish.

6. Return for tune up lessons and practice , practice practice.

7. practice practice practice, especially the parts of your game you're the weakest at.Strive to make the weakest part of your game your strength.


Going from a C+ to an A is definitly achievable in a few years with some dedication(proper fundamentals) and certainly possible as long as you weren't born with two left arms.

If you want to go from an A to a pro, drop everything else you are doing and give your whole life to pool....LOL

Wishing you fine success, RJ

ps. Make sure your cue isn't warped and have someone who knows what they are doing either shape your tip for you or have them make sure you are shaping it properly. A well shaped quality tip is vitaly important and musn't be ignored.

pss. Don't ignore step one.<hr /></blockquote>

Excellent advice! Very comprehensive. In fact, because I think it is so good, I've added a link to it from the threads area (http://www.engr.colostate.edu/~dga/pool/threads.html) on my website (under "training aids and advice").

Here's another piece of advice for RottingMindz: View all of my online instructional videos (http://www.engr.colostate.edu/~dga/pool/normal_videos/index.html) and read some of my online instructional articles (http://www.engr.colostate.edu/~dga/pool/bd_articles/index.html). They might help you better understand some of the important fundamentals of the game.

RottingMindz
03-09-2005, 11:49 AM
thx for the advice guys, and dr. dave, believe it or not, i actually learned all the basics (i.e. stroke, aim, 90 degree rule, draw, stop) from your site when i first started, so double thx to you! and i will go back and check out some other sections.
and do any of you guys mind briefly clarify how compensation for sidespin works?

dr_dave
03-09-2005, 11:52 AM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote RottingMindz:</font><hr> thx for the advice guys, and dr. dave, believe it or not, i actually learned all the basics (i.e. stroke, aim, 90 degree rule, draw, stop) from your site when i first started, so double thx to you! and i will go back and check out some other sections. <hr /></blockquote>
You are very welcome. It feels good to hear that people have found my stuff useful.

Regards,
Dr. Dave

Bob_Jewett
03-09-2005, 12:15 PM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote RottingMindz:</font><hr> ... and do any of you guys mind briefly clarify how compensation for sidespin works? <hr /></blockquote>
There are three major problems with using side spin: squirt, swerve and throw. First you need to understand what each is. As far as compensating, for short, firm shots you can compensate for squirt (which some people confusingly call "deflection") by aiming without english and then leaving your bridge hand in position and pivoting over to use english. The angle change from the pivot may cancel the angle change due to the squirt for a limited range of shots.

Mostly, you have to practice the shots. If you are a beginner, I think it will help to have a low-squirt cue stick, but most low-squirt cue sticks have too little squirt for the "aim-and-pivot" method described above to work. You may also want to find an instructor before you develop bad habits. There are lots of good books out there. For additional resources and definitions, see http://www.sfbilliards.com/faq.html

DickLeonard
03-09-2005, 07:33 PM
Dr Dave your new to the board this I have posted before but I want to share this with you. Your #5 tip here is what I did. My next door neighboor was Joe Canton winner of the 1951 National Championship. Joe was 5ft3 and the tables were switched to 4 1/2x 9 from 5x10 and Joes playing knowledge came into play.

He opened a room in 1958 and I would play every night after work. He would run 140 miss I would run 10 miss and he would run another 100+. This went on for weeks all I was doing was racking balls and getting no shooting time.

Then I got the bright idea of mentally copying his stroke,when he stroked I was stroking,after a few months
of this I started running 100s at him. His stroke was smooth as silk, he was always stroking with a very long bridge length wise but cross table his size didn't matter.

Anyone who has the opportunity to play with great player and fails to avail themselves of this technique to improve
is losing the best method of self improvement.

Mosconi went cross country playing Ralph Greenleaf in a series of exhibitions when they were thru Mosconi greatness was born.####

dr_dave
03-11-2005, 10:23 AM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote DickLeonard:</font><hr>Dr Dave your new to the board this I have posted before but I want to share this with you. Your #5 tip here is what I did.<hr /></blockquote>
FYI, the tips quoted in my last message are from recoveryjones, not me (dr_dave). I was just commenting on them because I agreed with them.

<blockquote><font class="small">Quote DickLeonard:</font><hr>My next door neighboor was Joe Canton winner of the 1951 National Championship. Joe was 5ft3 and the tables were switched to 4 1/2x 9 from 5x10 and Joes playing knowledge came into play.

He opened a room in 1958 and I would play every night after work. He would run 140 miss I would run 10 miss and he would run another 100+. This went on for weeks all I was doing was racking balls and getting no shooting time.

Then I got the bright idea of mentally copying his stroke,when he stroked I was stroking,after a few months
of this I started running 100s at him. His stroke was smooth as silk, he was always stroking with a very long bridge length wise but cross table his size didn't matter.

Anyone who has the opportunity to play with great player and fails to avail themselves of this technique to improve
is losing the best method of self improvement.

Mosconi went cross country playing Ralph Greenleaf in a series of exhibitions when they were thru Mosconi greatness was born.####
<hr /></blockquote>
That's a great testimonial. Thank you for sharing it with us.

Regards,
Dr. Dave

Deeman2
03-11-2005, 12:20 PM
Rottingmindz,

All good suggestions especially from Mr. Leonard. However, if they don't work you might considering the following.

A) Sell you car and buy a nice cue.
B) Get a divorce now and save doing it later.
C) Hit 2,000 balls a day.
D) Put your mattress under a table.
E) Start off with less harmless drugs, then step it up by small levels.
F) Start a serious relationship with Allison.
G) Take up bowling.
H) Post more on the non-pool related side, we are never wrong there.
I) Do a Vulcan Mind Meld with F/L.
J) Get a new nickname (I think Dimebag is now available).
K) Watch "The Baltimore Bullet" until you don't notice the acting.
L) Gain 100 lbs. so at least some mistake you for someone named Fats.
M) Look very hard for possible ansestry from the Philipines.
N) Buy a Spider Ball Aiming Laser, heck buy three of them.
O) Develop a sick facination with chalk.
P) If you smoke quit, if you don't, then start.
Q) Quit your day job.
R) Do a pilgrimage to PettyPoint.
S) Learn to say, "I hit that too good." with a serious frown.
T) Have fun....

Seriously, I think just copying other's stroke and games will help but not substitute for good instruction from a qualified person. How good you will become is a function of your natural hand eye coordination, your willingness to put in a lot of hours at practice and continuly putting yourself against better players when it means something (money, pride, trophy, etc.)

The hardest thing, for many of us, is to trust that your instructor knows more than you. Many want to get better but say, "I know I only have a couple of things wrong with my game so..." Let someone who is trained or more skilled have your complete trust for a while and see what works.

Good Luck and have fun....

Scott Lee
03-12-2005, 11:28 AM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote Deeman2:</font><hr> Many want to get better but say, "I know I only have a couple of things wrong with my game so..." <hr /></blockquote>

Dee...If I only had a quarter for every time I heard that! LOL...it used to be a nickle, but nowadays you have to account for inflation AND deflection! LMAO /ccboard/images/graemlins/grin.gif

Scott