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hhilario
03-09-2005, 06:33 AM
How would a cue playability change if it's balance point is moved either forward or backward by a few inches (3 or more)?

BLACKHEART
03-09-2005, 10:03 AM
If the answer sounds simple, it's because it is. It would feel more forward weighted or more rearward weighted. The way a Q plays is more determined by the tip, ferrule material & taper of the shaft. By the way I can't imagin a way that you could change the balance point, more than an inch unless you added a big ol' hunk of lead or cut off 6-7 inches of the butt...JER

Popcorn
03-09-2005, 10:44 AM
quote
"If the answer sounds simple, it's because it is. It would feel more forward weighted or more rearward weighted. The way a Q plays is more determined by the tip, ferrule material & taper of the shaft. By the way I can't imagin a way that you could change the balance point, more than an inch unless you added a big ol' hunk of lead or cut off 6-7 inches of the butt...JER "


That's always interesting, you can add or remove quite a bit of weight from the butt and it doesn't move the balance point that much. It does however make the cue feel like it has changed a lot. Maybe because now your stroking hand is not supporting so much weight, the feel to your body now seems as though the balance has shifted forward even though it really hasn't very much. I do find that balance points do effect the way a cue plays. A back balanced cue, at least to me, seem to want to go out of line and is harder to stroke straight and control. A more front balanced cue seems to be easier to play with in general, again to me as a player. I have also found I like playing with a little lighter cue front balanced about 19 oz. It seemed to have power and is easy to control more so then a cue of the same weight that is back balanced. It's not in my head, I have experimented quite a bit over the years and tried to pin down exactly what I like in a cue, not only based on what I think feels good but how the cue ball responds with the greatest easy and consistency. unfortunately if you aren't able to do the work on the cue yourself, this is almost impossible to for the average person to experiment with. They can't keep ordering cues randomly trying to discover what they like.

hhilario
03-09-2005, 01:23 PM
[ QUOTE ]
I do find that balance points do effect the way a cue plays to me. A back balanced cue, at least to me, seem to want to go out of line and is harder to stroke straight and control. A more front balanced cue seems to be easier to play with in general.<hr /></blockquote>
Thanks, that's what I'm interested on: how is your game affected by it? I had one of those ramin cues that had a 3-pieced butt with weight rings and a couple of times I would remove the front ones and put too many on the back(3 or so), just to try how the cue would play (I mean me) but my curiosity didn't go that far to try putting the rings on the frontmost joint and try the difference. Has anyone done something like this?

Popcorn
03-09-2005, 01:35 PM
You can do some experimenting, I've done this, with solder. Get a roll of solder and cut off some pieces of different weights. 1/4 ounce 1/2 ounce 1 ounce and so on. You can wrap it around it around the cue in different places and put a rubber band or some tape over it to keep it in place and tight. It works good. I was doing this with a cue once and I got it so perfect I played with the cue in tournaments for quite some time with the tape all over it. I think people thought I had broken the cue or something. Try it, it works. Once you find what you like make note of it.

Cane
03-09-2005, 07:16 PM
JER, I see what you mean. I got out my Jerico and a McDermott that I have... both are 60" cues. The Jerico feels MUCH more forward weighted than the McDermott, so I just measured to see how much difference there is in them. Both cues weight within a couple of grams of 19 ounces, the Jerico has a balance point of exactly 20 inches. The Mcdermott's balance point is 19 inches. It's only an inch, but man, you can feel a WORLD of difference stroking the two cues. Of course, like you said, playability is mostly determined by shaft taper, tip, ferrule material, while I would argue that pin design (size and material), Joint design and construction and choice of wood for the butt of the cue also have bearing on it (I'm an ebony freak, plain and simple).

I'm getting carried away here. My point was that I can feel a drastic difference in the way the two cues feel in my stroke hand when I play. I would have figured that there was a LOT more difference in the balance point than one inch, but I was wrong!

Later,
Bob

hhilario
03-11-2005, 11:49 AM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote Popcorn:</font><hr> You can wrap the solder around the cue in different places and put a rubber band or some tape over it to keep it in place and tight. <hr /></blockquote>

Sounds quite interesting, I'll give it a try in the next week. Do you recall which was the cue situation prior and after the solder (weight, balance from bottom, etc.)?