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View Full Version : 9ball rules suggestion



06-02-2002, 05:08 PM
You already know i think the break in 9ball is to much based on luck, especialy when the rack isnt good.
So here is a rule i think is good for the break.
Breaker doesnt have to make any balls on the break and he may scratch ( not jump of the table ).
After the break he takes the cueball and puts it anywhere on the table and then the opponent decides who plays ( like a ball in hand push out after every break ).
Ofcource the balls still need to be spread out nicely so to make players break hard anough there could be a rule like at least 3 object balls should be on the close half side of the table.

jjinfla
06-02-2002, 05:32 PM
Malcolm, If you think that the break in 9-ball is mostly luck then I suggest you go and watch Mika Immonen break sometime. He has perfected it to an art form. Jake

06-02-2002, 06:11 PM
When the 9 is on the spot its fairly easy to make the 1ball...
But the shot you get next is still up to luck.
And i think its good to force a litle strategy to get the first shot.

MaineEAck
06-03-2002, 10:06 AM
Not true, a lot of the top players play the break shot in a different way depending on where the 2 ball is in the rack... That way they have a shot on the 2ball after they make the 1ball in the side...

06-03-2002, 10:14 AM
Might be, but you cant realy do that without the tightrack.
And since everybody seems to hate the tightrack it would be better to make the break unimportant.

MaineEAck
06-03-2002, 10:25 AM
The break is a part of the game... it has been working fine for so long... why does everybody want to change things?

OntheSnap
06-03-2002, 10:33 AM
I like Grady's rule change. Nothing to do with the break however.

Anytime your opponent misses unles he calls a safe, you can tell him to shoot agian. In other words if he misses and hooks you, its his problem like it should be! This rule belongs in the game!

Jay M
06-03-2002, 10:37 AM
That rule used to be in the game. You're talking about two-shot foul. The way it was played is that you didn't "have" to hit the object ball on your shot, however your opponent had the choice between taking the leave or forcing you to shoot again, just like the push after the break is played now. I liked those rules because there was more strategy to the game, but the games were too involuted for television, which is a must if we are going to continue to grow the sport (or even START to grow the sport)

Jay M

06-03-2002, 10:38 AM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote: OntheSnap:</font><hr> I like Grady's rule change. Nothing to do with the break however.

Anytime your opponent misses unles he calls a safe, you can tell him to shoot agian. In other words if he misses and hooks you, its his problem like it should be! This rule belongs in the game! <hr></blockquote>

First time i hear this, i think its very good.
And callshot should be in any game.

06-03-2002, 10:45 AM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote: Jay M:</font><hr> That rule used to be in the game. You're talking about two-shot foul. The way it was played is that you didn't "have" to hit the object ball on your shot, however your opponent had the choice between taking the leave or forcing you to shoot again, just like the push after the break is played now. I liked those rules because there was more strategy to the game, but the games were too involuted for television, which is a must if we are going to continue to grow the sport (or even START to grow the sport)

Jay M <hr></blockquote>

I dont agree with your last comment...
Why try to make pool more attractive to people who dont care about pool ( wich i think they arent even succeeding at ) and at the same time making pool worse for people who do like pool.
I think they should just try to make good game rules with a lot of strategy play.

Snooker on bbc is very popular and matches take more then 10 hours in the world championship plus the most interesting frames in the matches are the long strategic frames... ( its not me saying this, its the commentaters and im sure most of the people watching agree )

OntheSnap
06-03-2002, 10:45 AM
thats different- those were called pushouts. There is no pushout really-its just "shoot again"

Jay M
06-03-2002, 11:10 AM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote:</font><hr>I dont agree with your last comment...
Why try to make pool more attractive to people who dont care about pool ( wich i think they arent even succeeding at ) and at the same time making pool worse for people who do like pool.
I think they should just try to make good game rules with a lot of strategy play. <hr></blockquote>

Because as long as there are no new players coming into the game, the game is stagnating. The younger generation is used to instant gratification and doesn't tend to have the patience (yes, I know, I'm stereotyping a bit) to play a true strategy game. If that was the case, we'd all still be playing straight pool which incorporates all of the elements of a true skill game.

Jay M

06-03-2002, 11:25 AM
I meant for the people who watch, not for those who play.
And i think even the younger players much prefer watching players realy compete instead of watching one of them run rack after rack.

Same problem with straight pool realy... the strategy might not be to bad but once someone makes a ball they can stay at the table till the end of the match.

Jay M
06-03-2002, 11:41 AM
yes, but the people that watch now are pretty much the same people at every tournament. You have to get fresh blood involved in the sport or it doesn't grow.

As to straight pool, it takes an ENORMOUS amount of skill to run out. In my entire life I have one run over 100 (187), and maybe a couple dozen or so over 50. Most games my high run is in the 30's at best and my average run, not counting safeties, is probably in the teens. Someone posted an interesting statistic on straight pool a while back. Ray Martin's average run during one of his World Championships was something like 10.3 (counting safeties) You think there wasn't a TON of strategy involved?

Right now, the most played strategy game is one-pocket (not counting snooker). I sat and watched Corey Deuel run, yes, I said run, 3 racks playing alternating break in one of Voodoo Daddy's tournaments at CM's Place. It doesn't matter the game that is played, once you reach a certain level of player, the potential for a run is always there.

Jay M

06-03-2002, 12:12 PM
Im sorry i tought the average run in straight pool was higher.
As for a run always being possible, it probably is but the level you need for that can be much higher so it realy wouldnt be possible...
But i think when you need to win at least one good strategy game to get your chance to run it is already much better then having the possibility to just run rack after rack without your opponent having a shot like in 9ball.

MaineEAck
06-03-2002, 12:42 PM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote: Jay M:</font><hr> &lt;blockquote&gt;&lt;font class="small"&gt;Quote:&lt;/font&gt;&lt;hr&gt;I dont agree with your last comment...
Why try to make pool more attractive to people who dont care about pool ( wich i think they arent even succeeding at ) and at the same time making pool worse for people who do like pool.
I think they should just try to make good game rules with a lot of strategy play. &lt;hr&gt;&lt;/blockquote&gt;

Because as long as there are no new players coming into the game, the game is stagnating. The younger generation is used to instant gratification and doesn't tend to have the patience (yes, I know, I'm stereotyping a bit) to play a true strategy game. If that was the case, we'd all still be playing straight pool which incorporates all of the elements of a true skill game.

Jay M <hr></blockquote>


1-Hole is my Favorite game, it is all strategy and can be slow at times, but I think that's the best part of it!! I also love 9-ball b/c it is fast paced, but in a way I have been forced upon this liking as no one and I mean no one in my local room plays 1-Hole. They all say it is too slow, and there are only 2 kids in my local room (Mike Dechaine and I) Mike also like 1-Hole but again none of the older guys like it because it is too slow, so you might want to re-word your statement about the younger generation, we may like things fast, but we also are able to appreciate the finer things of life.