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Pictoras
03-14-2005, 04:06 PM
Hi. This is a bit of a big problem for me and i hope i can get some advice.The ferrule on my b/j cue just cracked (it's a Lucasi ...it figures) and i HAVE to replace it myself since there is no store or cue repair guy in my country (i'm from Romania) and i think it would cost me too much to ship the shaft to somewhere to get it fixed.SO, what should i do, is it really that hard to change a ferrule (that is if i can order one) and wich type of ferrule should i use phenolic, melamine, Ivorine X, aegis..and so on.I really need your help.Thank You.

Oh and i allmost forgot, what type of tennon does a Lucasi shaft has?, if anyone knows that.

pooltchr
03-14-2005, 06:08 PM
Replacing the ferrule isn't that hard, but trimming it down to the size of the end of the cue is going to be tough unless you have a lathe. The ferrule is hollow in the center, and slips right on the tenon and glued there. You can cut the old one off, or heat it up and get the glue to let go and just slide the ferrule off. I don't think Lucasu uses a threaded ferrule, so that part is pretty easy. The tenon is just a small oak dowel, and you shouldn't have to replace it if you are careful removing the old ferrule. Clean off any old glue, and test the new ferrule to make sure it is a good fit...snug but not too tight. Coat the tenon with glue and slide the new ferrule into place. The ferrule is probably going to be larger around than the end of the cue, so you will have to trim it down to the same size. That's where you really need a lathe, but I suppose it could be sanded by hand and then polished. (My hands aren't that steady) Once it's in place, just put a new tip on it, shape the tip and you are ready to go.
Or...........send it off to get it fixed!
Steve

Popcorn
03-14-2005, 06:18 PM
Just out of curiosity, is there much pool played there? Maybe there is an opportunity to fix cues and make a few dollars. I sent a small lathe to a guy I met in Germany and he started doing very good. I could not believe you couldn't even get a tip replaced over there at the time. They were sending cues to the U.S. for repairs. You could get some video's that will teach you from Chris Hightower..

Barry
03-14-2005, 06:23 PM
You can buy the ferrule and then find a machinist or wood craftsman to replace it for you. there isn't that much to it for someone like that.

Barry

Pictoras
03-15-2005, 02:57 PM
The level of pool here isn't at a proffesional level but we play a lot of pool.Here is a paradox if you can belive it, we have the biggest pool hall in the SE Europe 45 GCIV!!! but no competitions are held there !!!!!, i've heard that Finland has the biggest hall with 25 tables and not all of GVIV...so imagine our frustration...people here are only using pool as a way to make mone but they don't give nothing back /ccboard/images/graemlins/frown.gif.
There is no one here that can to repair work on my cues or the other guys that own them, so i pretty much want to learn how to do something , i change my tips that's not a big thin but a ferrule change on a shaft cleaned right it is.The other thing is that i don't have much money to spend , reason is the minimum wage here is around 200$...so you understand.If i can learn some thinga that can help me to do all sorts of repairs, the extra money would be nice:).

Popcorn
03-15-2005, 03:23 PM
You could very quickly have a business with a little equipment and some pratice just doing simple repair such as tips, ferrules, rewraps, retapering, cleaning shafts and so on. All easy to learn repairs. Myself and I am sure everyone else here would be happy to give you whatever help you may need. For starters an inexpensive mini lathe and a wood lathe will let you do most all of basic repairs. You may make more money then you think once you get known a little.

Pictoras
03-15-2005, 06:33 PM
That's a good thing to hear, well..i'm waiting for advice /ccboard/images/graemlins/smile.gif.

Regarding the lathe, should i go look for one here in a wood shop, or i don't know, a mechanical shop.I don't know where should i begin.And does a wood lathe needs some modifications to do repairs on?

pooltchr
03-16-2005, 04:49 AM
Here is a good place to get an idea of what you need:
www.uniqueinc.com (http://www.uniqueinc.com)

As mentioned before, Chris Hightower also has a small cue lathe that is capable of doing everything you need.
Steve

Pictoras
03-16-2005, 02:24 PM
I really don't know who Chris Hightower is. /ccboard/images/graemlins/smile.gif /ccboard/images/graemlins/blush.gif

Wally_in_Cincy
03-16-2005, 02:30 PM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote Pictoras:</font><hr> I really don't know who Chris Hightower is. /ccboard/images/graemlins/smile.gif /ccboard/images/graemlins/blush.gif <hr /></blockquote>

http://www.cuesmith.com/

Pictoras
03-17-2005, 03:54 AM
That Micro Cue Smith III is 895$ base price...pretty steap for me, i was wondering maybe i can get a second hand one from somewhere, do you know where i might look for one?
I have around 300$ soo that is all i can spare for now /ccboard/images/graemlins/smile.gif.

SpiderMan
03-17-2005, 08:23 AM
Look into some of the 7"-swing mini-lathes available from Harbor Freight, Homiers, and others in the $300 range. You'll not only have something suitable for tip and ferrule work, but it is also a light-duty general-purpose machining tool for other hobbies.

Here's an example, but similar lathes are offered by several vendors. Although the price currently shows to be $369, they frequently are offered at $299 and I have seen them as low as $259. Before you buy, do an internet search for discussions on 7" Chinese lathes to gather consensus on whose product currently has the least-annoying flaws.

http://www.harborfreight.com/cpi/ctaf/Displayitem.taf?itemnumber=33684

SpiderMan

buddha162
03-17-2005, 09:13 AM
Hi Spidy,

Is that what you use to do tip/ferrule work?

I'm interested in getting a lathe just for tip/ferrule use, but have no idea where to start. I'm pretty sure I would need a host of additional tools to make it work.

-Roger

stickman
03-17-2005, 09:59 AM
This is the same lathe I have. Some additional things you'll need: A steady rest, http://www.harborfreight.com/cpi/ctaf/Displayitem.taf?itemnumber=4092 The bearings are covered with adhesive backed compressible printing blanket material, check with a local print shop. 1/2"lathe drill chuck, http://www.harborfreight.com/cpi/ctaf/Displayitem.taf?itemnumber=42340 shaft collets, a set of lathe pins for various shaft threads, a tool bit set, a digital caliper, a dial indicator, clamp light, several grades of sandpaper, 2 part epoxy, QuickTite. and other misc. items. This will get you started. /ccboard/images/graemlins/grin.gif

SpiderMan
03-17-2005, 10:03 AM
No, I don't use it because I already had a different lathe. I do, however, know a local guy who uses one. Also I seem to recall Fred Agnir, who posts here, saying he bought one.

SpiderMan

buddha162
03-27-2005, 11:24 AM
Thank you Sticman, much appreciated.

-Roger