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TommyT
03-25-2005, 10:02 AM
I got a stroke trainer for Christmas. It's now been 3 months and I'm ready to give my review. I've been doing 500 strokes per day for 90 days and that equals 45,000 perfect strokes. Let me start off by saying I'm a pretty accomplished player and felt my stroke was the least of my problems, but thought the stroke trainer couldn't hurt. It took 2 months before I could sense something was different. Slow rolling shots were more accurate and hard draws came back straighter. It's been just the last couple weeks that I've noticed a bigger change. This device definitely helps you hit the cueball where you intend to.
I think that for someone who's stroke might be a little shaky, the results would come sooner. I haven't bothered working on my off hand, because I wanted to see if this thing really worked. It does and I expect my left handed shots to improve with a commitment of working with the device. I struggled with the decision to share this with anyone because it is definitly an edge.

TommyT /ccboard/images/graemlins/cool.gif

bluey2king
03-25-2005, 10:09 AM
Thanks for Sharing your thoughts. About this product or any I like to see what others like and dis-like.
Thanks

Wally_in_Cincy
03-25-2005, 10:10 AM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote TommyT:</font><hr> ...I've been doing 500 strokes per day ...

<hr /></blockquote>

about how long does that take?

thanks for the review

mworkman
03-25-2005, 10:36 AM
I've always wanted to buy one of these, but the price was kinda steep. 500 strokes a day should help your game for sure. I wonder if someone did 500 strokes a day just using the line along the rail if that would have a similar effect. Or do you think the devise is crucial? Also, does it mess with your preshot routine because you are just stroking and not shooting any balls?

TommyT
03-25-2005, 11:19 AM
It takes about 10 minutes. I try to do it in the morning a few hours before I play. When I tried to play immediately after the 500 strokes,it interfered with my motion. Trying to stroke down the rail maybe helpful, but the trainer is easier and guarantees a perfect stroke.

TommyT

catscradle
03-25-2005, 11:39 AM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote TommyT:</font><hr> ... I wanted to see if this thing really worked. It does and I expect my left handed shots to improve with a commitment of working with the device. I struggled with the decision to share this with anyone because it is definitly an edge.

TommyT /ccboard/images/graemlins/cool.gif <hr /></blockquote>

I've had one a year longer than you (2 Christmas ago). I concur that it helps, sounds like your stroke was better than mine to start. Due to a job change I'm away from my pool table weekdays, since then I've found the stroke trainer even more helpful. I only do 100-150 strokes per hand at a time and not everyday. I think of it like weight training, you've got to let your muscles and connective tissue rest and recover between sessions. Maybe I'm wrong on that count since it isn't really strenuous.
One thing though in recent months I've noticed my elbows bothering me and have to wonder if it isn't related to the excessive repetitive motion, an overuse injury maybe. I'm 59 so it may be more a reflection of the aging process than the stroke trainer, or a combination of the 2.

Do you do your strokes in slow-motion the way the creator of the stroketrainer suggest? Personally I find that too tedious and do them quicker than that.

BTW, I had no left hand shot at all before the stroke trainer use. Now I can not only shoot left-handed, but successfully apply small amounts of draw, follow, or english.

randyg
03-25-2005, 12:36 PM
CATSCRADLE: You should be ready for school. See you soon.....SPF-randyg

catscradle
03-25-2005, 12:54 PM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote randyg:</font><hr> CATSCRADLE: You should be ready for school. See you soon.....SPF-randyg <hr /></blockquote>

You bet, I'm really looking forward to it.

christopheradams
03-25-2005, 02:23 PM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote TommyT:</font><hr> I got a stroke trainer for Christmas. It's now been 3 months and I'm ready to give my review. I've been doing 500 strokes per day for 90 days and that equals 45,000 perfect strokes. Let me start off by saying I'm a pretty accomplished player and felt my stroke was the least of my problems, but thought the stroke trainer couldn't hurt. It took 2 months before I could sense something was different. Slow rolling shots were more accurate and hard draws came back straighter. It's been just the last couple weeks that I've noticed a bigger change. This device definitely helps you hit the cueball where you intend to.
I think that for someone who's stroke might be a little shaky, the results would come sooner. I haven't bothered working on my off hand, because I wanted to see if this thing really worked. It does and I expect my left handed shots to improve with a commitment of working with the device. I struggled with the decision to share this with anyone because it is definitly an edge.

TommyT /ccboard/images/graemlins/cool.gif <hr /></blockquote>

Can you give us a link to a Website or some more information to the exact stroke trainer you are using. Thanks for the review. This may be helpful when traveling or when I can't get to the table.

Wally_in_Cincy
03-25-2005, 02:27 PM
http://www.stroketrainer.com/

christopheradams
03-25-2005, 02:33 PM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote Wally_in_Cincy:</font><hr> http://www.stroketrainer.com/ <hr /></blockquote>

Looks better than this one:
http://www.seyberts.com/instructional/products/images/buddyhall.jpg
Seems like a coke bottle would work as good as this one. TommyT can you just confirm this (http://www.stroketrainer.com) is the stroke trainer you got for Xmas. Thanks for the web site link Wally in Cincy.

Barbara
03-25-2005, 03:30 PM
I gotta get me one of these!!

Tell me I missed out at the Expo.

Barbara

theinel
03-25-2005, 04:09 PM
I've been looking at the pictures of this thing for a while and cant see anything special about it. It looks like a guide board to keep your arm online with two posts to slide your cue through. Is that all there is or is there something else I am missing? Thanks.

TommyT
03-25-2005, 08:26 PM
The website that Wally posted is the one I have. And,yes, it is that simple. A guide for your arm and an opening to push the tip of your cue thru. When I ordered my Trainer from Doug Carter he was frustrated because as he put it, the pool community is hesitant to share something that might help others. He told me he may stop marketing this device because of the cost to produce. Like i said, it has taken 3 months, but now as I'm stroking a shot I can feel the motion of the trainer. It's taken 45,000 repetitions. It takes 10 to 15 minutes to do the 500 reps.I can only do 125 at a time, then wait a minute or two and do more. Kinda like lifting weights.

TommyT

TommyT
03-25-2005, 08:30 PM
I like to vary the speed. I think it's important to mimic the actual stroke it takes to hit the cueball. Just going back and forth mindlessly won't help. You have to concentrate on the stroke.

mworkman
03-26-2005, 09:06 AM
Another thought... It says you need to keep a piece of paper from falling as you are stroking. Wouldn't that mean that you are applying some pressure against it as you are stroking? If you are, when you remove the devise wouldn't your arm come in some and thus not be perfectly straight anymore?

catscradle
03-26-2005, 10:03 AM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote mworkman:</font><hr> Another thought... It says you need to keep a piece of paper from falling as you are stroking. Wouldn't that mean that you are applying some pressure against it as you are stroking? If you are, when you remove the devise wouldn't your arm come in some and thus not be perfectly straight anymore? <hr /></blockquote>

That thought occurred to me also. I barely hold it to the "fin" and expect it to slip out occassionally, but without it I don't know what feedback would indicate whether or not your hand is diverting from a straight stroke.

ceebee
03-26-2005, 11:41 AM
Theinel, next time you go to a tournament, where you can try out the StrokeTrainer, you should do so. You might be amazed at the difficulty in just getting your cue through the guide posts.

NOTE: You don't have to purchase any training aid, as long as you do train correctly &amp; with discipline &lt;&lt; keyword. If you do not train, don't expect to grow very quickly or maybe not at all.

Most of the pros are naturals, but there are some VERY GOOD self made players out there. A dollar to your donut says "they DID NOT haphazardly learn to play well".

It amazes me that players will spend their money on cues, cases &amp; beer. Players will actually gamble several nights of the week, but they will not spend their money on videos, books, training aids and/or lessons to learn how to play the game.

christopheradams
03-26-2005, 04:15 PM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote ceebee:</font><hr>
It amazes me that players will spend their money on cues, cases &amp; beer. Players will actually gamble several nights of the week, but they will not spend their money on videos, books, training aids and/or lessons to learn how to play the game. <hr /></blockquote>

I'll spend money on all of the above but for me to take lessons I have to be sure the instructor:
1. Knows equal if not more information about pool than I do
2. Can play decent and at least hang with me at the table
Otherwise I'll just play and watch myself on video. Most of the good players I've seen play and don't teach and most of the teachers out there teach and don't play. I know good instructors are out there, just gotta find them and pay the Bucks$$$$.

catscradle
03-26-2005, 05:13 PM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote christopheradams:</font><hr> <blockquote><font class="small">Quote ceebee:</font><hr>
It amazes me that players will spend their money on cues, cases &amp; beer. Players will actually gamble several nights of the week, but they will not spend their money on videos, books, training aids and/or lessons to learn how to play the game. <hr /></blockquote>

I'll spend money on all of the above but for me to take lessons I have to be sure the instructor:
1. Knows equal if not more information about pool than I do
2. Can play decent and at least hang with me at the table
Otherwise I'll just play and watch myself on video. Most of the good players I've seen play and don't teach and most of the teachers out there teach and don't play. I know good instructors are out there, just gotta find them and pay the Bucks$$$$.
<hr /></blockquote>

In my experience in life, concerning all endeavors not just pool, the best doers are not always the best teachers and the best teachers are not always the best doers. Red Auerabach couldn't keep up with Bob Cousy on the basketball court, yet Red was a great teacher/coach and Cousy was horrible at teaching.
I think a pool instructor should have a proven track record as an instructor, not a player. It is of course ideal if he possesses both.

Regulator
03-27-2005, 01:45 PM
"I think a pool instructor should have a proven track record as an instructor, not a player. It is of course ideal if he possesses both."

I concur. In golf, most of the great instructors would be embarrassed to play on TV, yet the students look pretty good.

pooltchr
03-27-2005, 03:22 PM
There are many instructors that meet your requirements. Two who post here are RandyG and Scott Lee.
If you want an instructor that knows things you probably don't, and can "hang with you on the table", either one will handle the task.
Steve

DennyS
03-27-2005, 03:26 PM
Hi Barbara, In regarding the StrokeTrainer, Simply put it works! My students work with it everyday and some of them have bought their own so they could work with it at home. Attached is a picture of Mike Stewart working on it. It was really nice to have met you at Valley Forge. Take Care, Denny
http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v201/DStewart1/IMAG0062_edited.jpg

PQQLK9
03-27-2005, 04:14 PM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote pooltchr:</font><hr> There are many instructors that meet your requirements. Two who post here are RandyG and Scott Lee.
If you want an instructor that knows things you probably don't, and can "hang with you on the table", either one will handle the task.
Steve <hr /></blockquote>

Actually there are at least three. Steve is modest but I can vouch for him.

ceebee
03-27-2005, 05:08 PM
I can concur wuth CatsCradle too. There are many fine coaches &amp; teachers that cannot perform to the Nth degree, but they can sure help you get to your talent level, much quicker than the "Osmosis Journey" taken by most.

Finding a "Qualified Instructor", with a successful track record, is no longer a difficult task. We have a half-dozen Pool Forums &amp; the Internet to assist us.

A good Instructor is not neccessarily going to cost you a second mortgage on your home. Heavens to betsy, if you are playing $20 9-Ball (or more), save your winnings for your coaching lessons, so that you stay on the right side of your finances.

pooltchr
03-27-2005, 06:28 PM
Nick,
Thank you for the vote of confidence. I do my best, but I still look to instructors like Scott and Randy to help me get better. I guess it's much like the game itself. I don't think I will ever be satisfied to the point that I stop wanting to get better.
Guess that's the reason I'm heading to Dallas this week to spend some time at Cue-Tech.
Steve