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View Full Version : Adjusting from bar table to 9ft. table?



Billy_Bob
03-29-2005, 09:30 AM
All we have around here is bar tables (small town). So that is what I have learned to play on.

A larger city in my area has a pool hall with 9ft. tables and I went to play in a tournament there. (They just started having these tournaments.) I really embarassed myself as I missed many shots. (I can count on one hand how many times I have played on a 9ft table.)

Anyway it was like I was a beginner pool player all over again. I was trying to make shots and leave position, but couldn't make the shots. (Especially long cut shots.)

I feel I need to start all over again with these tables. First learn to pocket balls, then work on leaving for next shot. It is as if I don't know where to aim to make any balls. BTW other bar table players I saw there were having the same trouble.

Any suggestions for adjusting to these tables, or do I need to just get a lot of time under my belt playing on them?

Deeman2
03-29-2005, 09:35 AM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote Billy_Bob:</font><hr> All we have around here is bar tables (small town). So that is what I have learned to play on.

A larger city in my area has a pool hall with 9ft. tables and I went to play in a tournament there. (They just started having these tournaments.) I really embarassed myself as I missed many shots. (I can count on one hand how many times I have played on a 9ft table.)

Anyway it was like I was a beginner pool player all over again. I was trying to make shots and leave position, but couldn't make the shots. (Especially long cut shots.)

I feel I need to start all over again with these tables. First learn to pocket balls, then work on leaving for next shot. It is as if I don't know where to aim to make any balls. BTW other bar table players I saw there were having the same trouble.

Any suggestions for adjusting to these tables, or do I need to just get a lot of time under my belt playing on them?
<hr /></blockquote>

<font color="blue">Billy_Bob,

You just need a lot of time on the tables. A lot of us find niners easier than bar boxes but you will learn to adjust in time. The shots will be more difficult for a time but you should find position play easier. Just keep playing on the big tables and the adjustments will become more natural.

Good Luck...

Deeman </font color>

Barbarella
03-29-2005, 10:34 AM
I too ran into this as we compete on bar box tables. I found nine foot tables at the local college and went to work. Cut drills were in order as this seemed to give me the most trouble. Set up cuts along a rail for a good reference point using the rail. Learn them, and then move the ball out into the sea of green. Use a progressive drill, making each cut more difficult. It is all a matter of hard wiring the shot in your head given the longer playing surface.

On the flip side, it is usually harder for some big table players to go to a bar box because they have to adjust to the congestion of the balls on the smaller playing surface. Shots are easier, but cue ball position is much more exactly and unforgiving.

cheesemouse
03-29-2005, 11:23 AM
If your coming from a barbox to the nines. The first thing you should do is find the pocket speed for the nine footer. Shoot some balls with slight angels down the rails to the corners, missing slightly into the rail and see how excepting the corners are cut and how steep of an angle you can get away with. There will be a nice soft speed that allows you to make improperly hit balls.
Most barbox players are naturally jacked up, this is not good on the big tables. Most barbox players are very lazy about shots to the corners because of the forgiveness of most barboxes; they just are careless because you can be careless on the 'slopboxes'. Most barbox players shot way to hard and when they get on a big table they think they have to shot harder...wrong...
But like somebody said...just hit lots of balls and you will get used to the big tables, it is tough to adjust up but easy to adjust down...That's why you should have the biggest table you can fit in your home room, even if all you league play, tournament play are on barboxes......that's my opinion and no one can change it.... /ccboard/images/graemlins/grin.gif

BigRigTom
03-29-2005, 11:43 AM
Billy_Bob I learned on bar tables and the 1st time I played on a 9 ft I felt like I was going from a row boat to an air craft carrier. The "sea of green" was really imtimidating.
Shooting a lot of balls does help with getting used to the extra space...especially the long cut shots.
The ONE THING that helped me most though was when one of our really good players (an APA 9) pointed out the difference in the way the pockets are cut..specifically the angle of the rail cut into the pocket.
Some tables may have tighter pockets than others but most 9 ft tables will be tighter than bar tables...regardless how tight the pocket...look at the way the end of the rail is angle cut into the pocket.
This will help you decide the best way to aim your shot at that pocket and you'll probably want to shoot more to the outside of the pocket as opposed to shooting to the inside of the bar table pockets.
This was the single most valuable piece of advice I have had on the adjustment process.
Hope it helps you.

ceebee
03-29-2005, 12:03 PM
I play on 9 foot Gold Crowns or Diamond Pro, except when I play Golf on a Snooker table.

However, all of the local tournaments are on Bar Boxes. The change is a definite one, but if you happen to play on a good, flat Bar Box with good cloth (you should be so lucky) you might enjoy the ease of play. Good cue ball control is imperative &amp; re-learning the banking difference will be your first goals.

The real bitchi* gripe I have about bar boxes is the shallow shelf in the pocket &amp; the friggin' roll off. A normal shelf &amp; no roll off, with a normal cut pocket would bring back some accuracy to the 8-Ball or 9-Ball game on a Bar Box. That would be fun.

Quality is hard to find...

Eric.
03-29-2005, 12:38 PM
Like alot of people pointed out, ther are a few important adjustments. The biggest adjustment is that you HAVE to hit your corner shots clean. You need to be more precise in pocketing balls that are cut along the long rail into the pockets. On bar boxes, you can cut a ball into the longrail, as much as a full diamond before the pocket and still make the ball. On alot of 9fters, if you touch the side rail, you're gonna hanging the OB in the mouth of the pocket.

There are other adjustments i.e. position routes. Sometimes you need to play different position routes for example:

On a 9 ft table use:

START(
%GF5X8%Hf2Y4%Ir1U6%PR1Z2%WH7X4%XQ2Y7%YC9K9%ZG0W6%[E7E4%\D0I2
%]X3S1%^G0D4%eC1b4
)END

Where on a bar box, it might be better to use something different to avoid drawing the CB off the 7 into the opposite corner or if you avoid the scratch, you might come too far up table to have a good angle on the 8 (becasue of the smaller table). On a bar box, I might use this:

START(
%GF5X8%Hf2Y4%Ir1U6%PR1Z2%Uq7G2%Vl4D0%WH7X4%XQ2Y7%Y C9T7%ZG0W6
%[j1D8%\C2S0%]]0U3%^r2H6%eC2`6
)END


Eric

DialUp
03-29-2005, 01:57 PM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote Billy_Bob:</font><hr>Adjusting from bar table to 9ft. table?<hr /></blockquote>


Assuming the table is setup correctly, same cue ball, same railes, etc... there is only one real adjustment to be made. That is speed control...


As far as aiming goes, there is no difference in aiming on any table that is level. You either aim for the center of the pocket (for example) or you miss... Tighten up your aiming technique on the bar box and it should transfer nicely to a real table. You should try to hit the part of the pocket you are aiming at. I see the pocket in fourths. I aim at one of the four pieces and am not happy with the shot if I hit one of the other three... Practice hitting the pocket... don't be happy with hitting the rail 1.5 diamonds up and still pocketing the ball when you were aiming for the center of the pocket... Alot of bar players get good enough to get out although they are barely pocketing balls. I feel these easy tables never make them work on precision aiming and confines them to the small tables...


Most bar table players I have seen have the same problem. They are master shot makers with short shots and giant pockets. However, put them on a 9 foot Gold Crown and their pocketing ability goes south. I was one of them several years ago. I always played the coin ops because I was a much better player (ball pocketing) on those. Then one day I realized it was'nt the table that made me better on the 7', it was my skill that made me worse on the 9'. I quickly changed tables and worked on the broken parts of my game. Now I kick ass on a bar box and can hold my own on the big table.

Duckie
03-29-2005, 02:05 PM
One of the things to practice on the bar table that might help on the 9 footers is on the bar table, always aim for the center of the pocket. With bar tables with wide pockets, one can get kinda sloppy on where the object ball falls into the pocket, kinda like cheating the pocket. So with wide pockets and shorter distance to pocket, the contact point does not need to be hit as precisely as on the 9 footers.

The further the ball is away from the pocket, the more precise you have to hit the contact point on the object ball. So if you practice always for center pocket, this should carry over to the 9 footers. As for ball speed, that's gonna take table time.

Also, on bank shots, the angle coming off the rail does not need to be as wide on 9 footers as on bar table. Since the 9 footer is wider, less angle off the rail is needed as the object ball travels further opening up the angle, so to speak.

FWIW

GeraldG
03-29-2005, 02:11 PM
The adjustment is mostly mental. There are some physical differences, notably that it's easier to move the cueball around a 9-footer because the balls aren't so clustered up, some of the angles are a little different for kicks and banks, there are some differences in the pocket design....but the center of the pocket is in the same place on every table.

To me the 9-footers were like shooting marbles down a football field at first...very intimidating. The shots seemed MUCH longer, even though there's only a two-foot difference in the length of the table. But, it's really not that tough to adjust. Then when you go back to play on a bar table you can shoot lights-out.

Toddo26
03-29-2005, 06:20 PM
I shot bar tables for more than 20 years. Then about 5 months ago I started on the 9 footers. I rather the 9 footers much more. The hardest things to adjust to was the spin induced throw, and swerve. I evidently use alot more throw and swerve than I realized. Also Follow shots are much more difficult on 9 footers. I had alot of trouble going back and forth between the two types of tables at first. My game really dropped off for a while. But I'm starting to get much more comfortable now. The differences in the tables that I have named is mostly due to cueball weight, and cloth thickness and quality. It has little to do with the size of the tables. Just my opinion, Todd