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View Full Version : Suggestions for improving pool books/videos



Billy_Bob
03-31-2005, 10:50 AM
Since we have so many billiards book writers and video producers on this forum, I though it would be a good idea to offer helpful suggestions for improving these books and videos.

One problem I have is taking what I have learned from a book or video to the pool table - to practice it. If you have things you want to practice from several different books/videos and don't have your own pool table, this can be cumbersome. Even when practicing something from one book, you can spend a lot of time turning pages finding various shots. Then the book will not stay open to that page.

What I have done is copied various shots (from all sources, books, videos, internet, my own) all into the same sized standard diagrams. Some of these I have pasted on the wall in my pool room. The shots to practice I have in a three ring binder and in the order I need to practice them. The link below is a sample of one of my diagrams.

Now I can just flip a page and go from one practice shot to the next. The page stays open as it is in a three ring binder. I can also take the three ring binder over to my pool table to set up complicated cluster shots. Now I spend my time practicing rather than hunting through books/videos for various shots.

I did this with Adobe Photoshop and started with a B&W pool table diagram from San Francisco Billiard Academy (Thanks Bob), then added color to the graphic. The balls are larger and not to scale so they can be seen easier. I made the pool table as large as would fit landscape on an 8 1/2 x 11 sheet of paper.

Most people do not have access to Photoshop, etc. I would suggest that books and videos offer an optional set of shot diagrams, such as these, which could be placed in a three ring binder for practice.

One of my diagrams...
http://www.geocities.com/billybobnospam/cut1.jpg

Blank B&W table diagrams....
http://www.sfbilliards.com/pool_table.pdf

ceebee
03-31-2005, 11:35 AM
I have many Instructional videos & shelves of Billiard books. I am sorry to say that I have only been creating this library for 6 or 7 years. The amount of knowledge, which I have embraced has helped become a finer player. It's too damned bad I am 63 & can't see well anymore.

When I give a lesson, I always show the subject matter video or book to my student & explain the concept behind the shot or the pattern. The student gets to take the video or book home to use in studying.

I also make a video of the practice session, including the audio, so the student will have more input for study. I also make drawings on AutoCad to give the student a "shot map".

One mistake made by many is this. Attempting to learn 50 shots in a day is overwhelming & very difficult at best. Learning 6 shots (angle of cut, cue ball carom path for 1 rail, 2 rail & 3 rail position) in a week is an attainable goal & the memory of these shots is probably permanent.

I always appraise a student by watching them play & talkng with them about their shooting abilities. I ask what they perceive as a weakness & what they are seeking to learn.

I then develop a list of lessons (sample>> Stroke, Pattern Shots, Carom Shots, Diamond System, Break Shots & Safety Play) & I follow that list. Bouncing around creates confusion.

Keeping the lessons in a 3-ring binder, makes retrieving the lessons for more study very convenient.

Just about any book can be altered to lay flat by removing the binding. That of course does not ruin the book, but the book pages will have to be contained (hole punched or filed) in some manner, to keep track of the loose sheets.

Discipline in your practice is absolutely imperative. If you do not practice diligently, you may be cheating yourself.

I look back at my years in school & I have to say to myself. If I had learned everything that was submitted to me, my life would have been greater by far.

Learning is easy, unlearning is tough.

dr_dave
03-31-2005, 01:45 PM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote Billy_Bob:</font><hr>I would suggest that books and videos offer an optional set of shot diagrams, such as these, which could be placed in a three ring binder for practice.<hr /></blockquote>
FYI to all, I have several blank diagrams available on my website (http://www.engr.colostate.edu/~dga/pool/) that players and instructors can use to diagram shots for practice, instruction, or documentation. There is a full color version (http://www.engr.colostate.edu/~dga/pool/instructional_diagrams.pdf), and two different B&amp;W versions (with shading (http://www.engr.colostate.edu/~dga/pool/instructional_diagrams_BW.pdf), ink-conserving lines-only version (http://www.engr.colostate.edu/~dga/pool/instructional_diagrams_BW_no_fill.pdf)). They are all drawn to scale based on the BCA specifications, and they contain grid lines to help line things up. The pages print to fill a 8.5"x11" page suitable for a 3-ring binder, and there are two tables per page with room for annotations. You can print the pages directly from the website; or, if you prefer, you can save the files directly to your own computer (by right-clicking and selecting "Save Target As").

Happy diagramming,
Dr. Dave

christopheradams
03-31-2005, 02:53 PM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote dr_dave:</font><hr> <blockquote><font class="small">Quote Billy_Bob:</font><hr>I would suggest that books and videos offer an optional set of shot diagrams, such as these, which could be placed in a three ring binder for practice.<hr /></blockquote>
FYI to all, I have several blank diagrams available on my website (http://www.engr.colostate.edu/~dga/pool/) that players and instructors can use to diagram shots for practice, instruction, or documentation. There is a full color version (http://www.engr.colostate.edu/~dga/pool/instructional_diagrams.pdf), and two different B&amp;W versions (with shading (http://www.engr.colostate.edu/~dga/pool/instructional_diagrams_BW.pdf), ink-conserving lines-only version (http://www.engr.colostate.edu/~dga/pool/instructional_diagrams_BW_no_fill.pdf)). They are all drawn to scale based on the BCA specifications, and they contain grid lines to help line things up. The pages print to fill a 8.5"x11" page suitable for a 3-ring binder, and there are two tables per page with room for annotations. You can print the pages directly from the website; or, if you prefer, you can save the files directly to your own computer (by right-clicking and selecting "Save Target As").

Happy diagramming,
Dr. Dave <hr /></blockquote>

Thanks for the diagrams Dr. Dave. Very useful. Printed out and will be diagramming more shots. I have a huge folder full with diagrams.
I started diagramming with the Wei table but find it takes too long and its easier just to use blank diagrams.

I also used a photo copier to shrink down a blank diagram with the reduce function. I then make a bunch of copies of the reduced version and cut the out and tape them to a full sheet of paper and then photo copy that to get one full sheet of paper with like 10 or so mini diagram pages on it. I can then have like 10 shots diagrammed on each page.

I diagrammed all of Bert kinisters drills in his first video, all burns drills in pool workout that I found useful, all Buddy halls drills in 9ball instructional video(found all his drills useful!)(working on the star system diagrams), all of the 99 critical shots in pool I found useful, Some of burns drills in his books, All the pro book by bob henning drills and got a lot of other stuff diagramed as well. Really using Buddy Halls stuff, He is a genius and recommend his video series!

theinel
03-31-2005, 03:18 PM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote Billy_Bob:</font><hr>Most people do not have access to Photoshop<hr /></blockquote>
Photoshop is a great program but is quite expensive. The GIMP is a good alternative open source program that is completely free. It is available at The GMIP Wesbite (http://www.gimp.org/downloads/).

The three ring binder (or spiral format) mention by Billy_Bob is a very good one that I think more instructional publishers should consider.

Popcorn
03-31-2005, 03:44 PM
Tom Rossman had a book that was about 4 1/2 x 8 inches that would lay flat on the rail of the table. Miz also put out a book that worked the same way.

ras314
03-31-2005, 06:46 PM
Sounds like you may be a canidate for The Billiards Workbook by Dr D. Lots and lots of pages of drills in a giant 3 ring notebook. Or maybe 4 ring, I think she had to get the thing made special. Also you pay dearly for poundage. /ccboard/images/graemlins/smile.gif

Bob_Jewett
03-31-2005, 07:20 PM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote ras314:</font><hr> Sounds like you may be a canidate for The Billiards Workbook by Dr D. Lots and lots of pages of drills in a giant 3 ring notebook. Or maybe 4 ring, I think she had to get the thing made special. Also you pay dearly for poundage. /ccboard/images/graemlins/smile.gif <hr /></blockquote>
There is some good info in it, but it's not worth the price. The drills are immensely repetitive. Have you seen the Workbook? It could have had the same info and all those drills in 100 pages. Add a CD if you can't figure out how to make individual table diagrams.

ras314
03-31-2005, 07:45 PM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote Bob_Jewett:</font><hr>
The drills are immensely repetitive. Have you seen the Workbook? It could have had the same info and all those drills in 100 pages. Add a CD if you can't figure out how to make individual table diagrams. <hr /></blockquote>

I saw the workbook at the open. My first reaction was it ought to contain anything ever thought of about pool. Then after flipping through the thing it seemed like endless straightforward variations of routine shots, some of which could be difficult. Finally I decided that if anyone could go through all that and keep the appropriate scores they would probably become quite proficient at doing drills. And probably better shotmakers than they were the years ago they started the process.

I would rather stay a mediocre player and have a little fun. And buy books or whatever that are interesting to learn from.

SpiderMan
04-01-2005, 08:30 AM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote theinel:</font><hr> <blockquote><font class="small">Quote Billy_Bob:</font><hr>Most people do not have access to Photoshop<hr /></blockquote>
Photoshop is a great program but is quite expensive. The GIMP is a good alternative open source program that is completely free. It is available at The GMIP Wesbite (http://www.gimp.org/downloads/).

The three ring binder (or spiral format) mention by Billy_Bob is a very good one that I think more instructional publishers should consider. <hr /></blockquote>

Sort of getting off-topic here, but another cheap (or free) editing program is Ulead Photoimpact. I use it for most of my photo restoration projects, and find it's easier for many tasks than Photoshop. Photoimpact used to be included for free on all the CDs that came with Canon digital cameras. Don't know if that is still the case.

SpiderMan

Billy_Bob
04-01-2005, 09:40 AM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote ras314:</font><hr> Sounds like you may be a canidate for The Billiards Workbook by Dr D. Lots and lots of pages of drills in a giant 3 ring notebook. <hr /></blockquote>

Actually I have about 60 diagrams I practice which all fit into a small 3 ring binder. It is things like Dr. Daves 90/30 degree rules along with hitting these shots with different speeds, selected shots from 99 critical shots, shots from Dr. Dave's DVD, shots from Jimmy Reid's videos, and shots from other books and the internet.

These are mostly "fundamental" shots... i.e. Principles and "ball behavior" which can be applied to many different shots/situations, where cue ball will go after shot, avoiding scratching, interesting "quirky" things you can make the balls do, etc.

Practicing these things has really helped me. The other night I played a tournament without scratching once. (Thanks Dr. Dave and your 30/90 degree rules!) And I am getting much better at getting the cue ball to go where I want. Also recognizing a ball in a cluster which can be made or hit a certain way to make the interaction of balls throw a ball into a pocket, etc. (99 critical shots)