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SnakebyteXX
04-03-2005, 05:13 AM
Lynette Evans

Saturday, April 2, 2005

Time was, setting the clocks meant winding the grandfather clock in the hall and maybe a pocket watch. Later, electric kitchen clocks only needed resetting after a power outage. That's about all the timepieces one had to contend with when daylight-saving time was instituted in Europe in 1916, followed by the United States in 1918. Oh, that it were so today.

Few households still have a working grandfather clock, and the kitchen wall clock has been replaced by clocks on the oven, the microwave, the coffee maker, the kitchen entertainment center and perhaps the refrigerator. Multiply that entertainment center clock by the number of VCRs and DVD players in the house; add in the timers on the motion-detector lighting, spa heaters, plant grow lights and programmable thermostats; don't forget the alarm clock -- making sure you get the a.m.-p.m. straight on digital clocks so the meat loaf won't start to bake at 3 a.m. and your alarm keeps its silence until 7 p.m. --

and you'll have had to get up early this morning just to adjust for daylight- saving time by the time you go to bed tonight.

Thankfully, latter-day computers and cell phones usually are cued into daylight-saving time and reset themselves, but that old phone answering machine probably isn't, so if you don't reset the time today, next week it'll seem as if Dad is leaving messages awfully early in the morning.

Once the household clocks are reset -- forward one hour in spring -- it'll be time to reset everyone's watches, including those only worn to work or for sports. Then it's on to the automobiles, where you'll probably need a ballpoint pen to fit into that tiny hole that resets the hours and minutes. (Don't try this while driving; not only will you go sailing past the allotted hour, but you may also sail right past your exit or into another vehicle whose driver isn't paying attention, either, because he's trying to fit a ballpoint pen into his car's clock.)

Daylight-saving time begins the first Sunday in April and ends the last Sunday in October. After losing at least an hour today spent resetting your clocks, you'll lose another hour of sleep tonight. You won't make it up in the fall, either, because that extra hour will be spent setting the clocks back. No wonder we're a sleep-deprived nation. We have too many clocks and not enough time.


link (http://sfgate.com/cgi-bin/article.cgi?file=/c/a/2005/04/02/HOG7TC08P51.DTL)

Troy
04-03-2005, 08:59 AM
Not only do I have the normal assortment of clocks and watches mentioned, I also have an 1890 Grandfather clock and a 1865 Calender Mantle clock. Setting them forward is a snap; it's the fall back part that takes over an hour.

Troy
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote SnakebyteXX:</font><hr> Lynette Evans

Saturday, April 2, 2005

Time was, setting the clocks meant winding the grandfather clock in the hall and maybe a pocket watch. Later, electric kitchen clocks only needed resetting after a power outage. That's about all the timepieces one had to contend with when daylight-saving time was instituted in Europe in 1916, followed by the United States in 1918. Oh, that it were so today.

Few households still have a working grandfather clock, and the kitchen wall clock has been replaced by clocks on the oven, the microwave, the coffee maker, the kitchen entertainment center and perhaps the refrigerator. Multiply that entertainment center clock by the number of VCRs and DVD players in the house; add in the timers on the motion-detector lighting, spa heaters, plant grow lights and programmable thermostats; don't forget the alarm clock -- making sure you get the a.m.-p.m. straight on digital clocks so the meat loaf won't start to bake at 3 a.m. and your alarm keeps its silence until 7 p.m. --

and you'll have had to get up early this morning just to adjust for daylight- saving time by the time you go to bed tonight.

Thankfully, latter-day computers and cell phones usually are cued into daylight-saving time and reset themselves, but that old phone answering machine probably isn't, so if you don't reset the time today, next week it'll seem as if Dad is leaving messages awfully early in the morning.

Once the household clocks are reset -- forward one hour in spring -- it'll be time to reset everyone's watches, including those only worn to work or for sports. Then it's on to the automobiles, where you'll probably need a ballpoint pen to fit into that tiny hole that resets the hours and minutes. (Don't try this while driving; not only will you go sailing past the allotted hour, but you may also sail right past your exit or into another vehicle whose driver isn't paying attention, either, because he's trying to fit a ballpoint pen into his car's clock.)

Daylight-saving time begins the first Sunday in April and ends the last Sunday in October. After losing at least an hour today spent resetting your clocks, you'll lose another hour of sleep tonight. You won't make it up in the fall, either, because that extra hour will be spent setting the clocks back. No wonder we're a sleep-deprived nation. We have too many clocks and not enough time.


link (http://sfgate.com/cgi-bin/article.cgi?file=/c/a/2005/04/02/HOG7TC08P51.DTL) <hr /></blockquote>