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sneakypapi
04-16-2005, 10:16 AM
I wanted get some opinions regarding the ideal straightness of a shaft. I noticed when I roll some of my shafts (shaft only, not screwed with the butt together) the tip will stay flat against the table, but when I look further up the shaft half way towards the joint area the taper never seems to roll 100% even. I also wanted to point out if the taper is supposed to roll flat against the table or not? I am not sure if this is a product of the taper and no shaft will even roll perfect at the half way point between the tip and the joint or not. I want to get some feedback from players with custom cues and production cues. Of course most shafts are made out of wood a natural material that is modified to make a shaft, but I would think there is a level of error every cue maker and manufacturer use as acceptable straightness.

1Time
04-16-2005, 10:25 AM
I prefer testing a shaft while attached to the butt. It does me little good to have a straight shaft if the whole cue is not straight. One way is to give it a roll on the table. Another is to hold the cue vertical and give it a spin.

Qtec
04-16-2005, 10:30 AM
Use your eye.


Q...look down the shaft and turn........

Deeman2
04-16-2005, 10:34 AM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote sneakypapi:</font><hr> I wanted get some opinions regarding the ideal straightness of a shaft. I noticed when I roll some of my shafts (shaft only, not screwed with the butt together) the tip will stay flat against the table, but when I look further up the shaft half way towards the joint area the taper never seems to roll 100% even. <font color="blue"> The space created by the pro taper should remain constant when the shaft rolls. However, this is not the best way to test the straightness of a shaft. Sighting down the shaft is more effective. When you turn the shaft while sighting down it, any warp will be easily seen. To really know how straight a shaft is, it should be supported in twin rolls or "V" blocks with a dial indicator placed against the shft. By doing this at several points along it's length and rotating the shaft, the indicator will show the T.I.R. (Total Indicated Runout). .000" would be perfect but don't expect this. My shafts run from a few thousands(.001) to as much as .020" (twenty thousands) </font color> I also wanted to point out if the taper is supposed to roll flat against the table or not? <font color="blue"> The taper (not a true taper) will not lie flat. The space should, however, remain constant while rolling if the shaft is true. </font color> I am not sure if this is a product of the taper and no shaft will even roll perfect at the half way point between the tip and the joint or not. <font color="blue"> It is actually a product of the "not a real taper" as a pro taper is actually a "straight" blended into the taper. A true taper from joint to tip would lie flat on the table with no space while rolling. </font color> I want to get some feedback from players with custom cues and production cues. Of course most shafts are made out of wood a natural material that is modified to make a shaft, but I would think there is a level of error every cue maker and manufacturer use as acceptable straightness. <font color="blue"> Yes, there is. </font color> <hr /></blockquote>

Hope this helps....Fred's favorite words...

Deeman

SplinterHands
04-16-2005, 03:35 PM
Rolling a shaft any of the ways mentioned is not correct. The best way to test its straightness is to lay the whole cue overhanging the table. Have the butt on the table with the joint on the rail. The whole shaft will be off the table. Now roll it to see it's straightness. Laying the cue on the table and rolling it is not a good way to test straightness. Neither is sighting down the cue.

tateuts
04-16-2005, 08:40 PM
Here's what I do. First test is to just sight down it like a gun barrel and turn it slowly. This gives you a good view from the joint to the tip. You can definitely see any wow in the shaft right here.

Take it apart and place the butt section on a flat counter at eye level. Slowly turn each piece and look for any changes in the gap, joint, or butt, or lifting and falling if the joint or butt. Any change is the result of warping and the usual spot is the handle.

Do the same with the shaft.

If both the shaft and butt are straight individually, but the cue doesn't sight straight, the culprit is usually that the joint needs to be re-faced (squared), not a major operation, or ocassionally a pin will be bent.

If a shaft is fairly straight and the joint is true, the cue is plenty straight to play.

Many old collectible cues are slightly warped. This does not make them junk and in many cases only marginally hurts their value. Cues that are badly warped, particularly in the forearm and the shaft(s), definitely are of less value than a straight example.

Chris

Deeman2
04-18-2005, 09:47 AM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote SplinterHands:</font><hr> Rolling a shaft any of the ways mentioned is not correct. The best way to test its straightness is to lay the whole cue overhanging the table. Have the butt on the table with the joint on the rail. The whole shaft will be off the table. Now roll it to see it's straightness. Laying the cue on the table and rolling it is not a good way to test straightness. Neither is sighting down the cue. <hr /></blockquote>

<font color="blue">I mentioned several ways to check a shaft. I, also, don't think the first two are the best method. However, if you believe any visual method is best, please don't check any of my shafts for straightness. Your method still relies on a visual reference plus the trueness of the edge you are rolling it on and not a mechanical measurement. No wonder you have splinters in your hands. Just joking...

Please clarify, what is more accurate than the center rolls and a dial indicator. Inquiring minds want to know. </font color>

Deeman