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Leviathan
04-18-2005, 04:35 AM
I don't control the length of straight draw well on shots of average length. Question: On shots of average length, do good players control the distance they draw the cb (1) mainly by hitting the cb harder or softer, (2) mainly by hitting the cb higher or lower, or (3) by adjusting both power of stroke and height of hit? Thanks for any thoughts!

AS

randyg
04-18-2005, 05:00 AM
At CUE-TECH Pool School our students understand that there are only three (3) things that they can control. ANGLE-SPEED-SPIN.

Therefore if the shot is straight in the ANGLE is secured. The other two variables are SPEED-SPIN. Our students have been taught "stroke speed" is used in 60% of their shot making. This leaves only one variable to work on, SPIN. By adjusting tip positions only(which they can see), they then draw the cue-ball to any length they chose(within reason).....Just our thoughts. Hope it helps.....SPF-randyg

Leviathan
04-18-2005, 05:05 AM
Thanks, Randy. That's very helpful--just what I wanted to know. Your reasoning makes sense. Hope to attend your school some time!

AS

Deeman2
04-18-2005, 05:43 AM
Scott Lee helped me control my length of draw. I know he used the same methods that Randy does. Get off that big wallet and get one of these fine instructors to spend an afternoon with you. It is worth every cent.

Deeman

Sid_Vicious
04-18-2005, 05:44 AM
randyg...You are saying it is the tip position mostly and the stroke speed is mainly the same for the most part? I also have this weakness, especially on lengthy distances and on power, back-into-the-siderail-and-out draws for opposite end shape. Thanks, I will try putting in some practice time with it if this was what you meant...sid

ceebee
04-18-2005, 06:24 AM
That was a very good explanation about using tip position to control the cue ball action, after impact, which is precisely the point. Without cue ball control, there is no hope.

PQQLK9
04-18-2005, 06:36 AM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote Leviathan:</font><hr> I don't control the length of straight draw well on shots of average length. Question: On shots of average length, do good players control the distance they draw the cb (1) mainly by hitting the cb harder or softer, (2) mainly by hitting the cb higher or lower, or (3) by adjusting both power of stroke and height of hit? Thanks for any thoughts!

AS <hr /></blockquote>

That is something that I learned really well from Scott Lee.

Basically by using bridge length to control follow through and draw. Shorter the bridge, shorter the draw.

On a good day I can draw from 2" to 8' and most points in between /ccboard/images/graemlins/smile.gif

pooltchr
04-18-2005, 06:50 AM
Nick,
grab me next time you are at the Green Room....we'll se if we can change that "on a good day" to "EVERY day"!
Steve

dr_dave
04-18-2005, 09:16 AM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote Leviathan:</font><hr> I don't control the length of straight draw well on shots of average length. Question: On shots of average length, do good players control the distance they draw the cb (1) mainly by hitting the cb harder or softer, (2) mainly by hitting the cb higher or lower, or (3) by adjusting both power of stroke and height of hit? Thanks for any thoughts!<hr /></blockquote>
Option (2) is usually recommended, but speed must also be adjusted based on the shot distance. For more info, see my message (http://www.billiardsdigest.com/ccboard/showthreaded.php?Cat=&amp;Board=ccb&amp;Number=185769&amp;page =0&amp;view=collapsed&amp;sb=5&amp;o=&amp;fpart=&amp;vc=&amp;PHPSESSID=) in a previous thread discussing draw technique.

Regards,
Dr. Dave

Leviathan
04-18-2005, 10:14 AM
Thanks, Dr. Dave: another good presentation. I find your posts and website very helpful.--AS

Leviathan
04-18-2005, 10:17 AM
That thing that looks like a wallet is just excess fatty tissue.

--AS

Billy_Bob
04-18-2005, 10:21 AM
I had the same problem then spent two months working on draw shots.

The first thing I did was to remove as many variables as possible. This means to practice with a consistent tip with a consistent amount of chalk applied and the cue ball an exact distance from the object ball (1 diamond back).

By consistent tip, I mean always same radius (nickel shape or dime shape) and always same surface condition. Also apply chalk before *every* single draw shot, especially around the sides of the tip. Examine the tip under the light after applying chalk to be sure there are no dark spots.

Also practice on same table with same set of balls if possible.

So the above removes a lot of variables, then all that is left is how you hit the cue ball and your stroke.

Then with the cue ball 1 diamond back from the object ball (I line up a row of balls across the table), practice getting the cue ball to draw back 1/2 diamond, then 1 diamond, then 1 1/2 diamonds, then 2 diamonds, etc. How you manage to do this is up to you. Experiment with what others have suggested.

With about two months of practice doing this, I got to be pretty good at accurately drawing back the cue ball.

Now I will shoot a few warm-up draw shots on unfamiliar tables to see how well or how poorly the cue ball/ cloth draws. That is another variable - condition of cue ball and speed of cloth. But once you can accurately draw back the cue ball on a specific table, then it is fairly easy to adapt to other tables.

dr_dave
04-18-2005, 10:23 AM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote Leviathan:</font><hr> Thanks, Dr. Dave: another good presentation. I find your posts and website very helpful.--AS <hr /></blockquote>
You're welcome, and thank you.

Leviathan
04-18-2005, 10:47 AM
Thanks for the ideas, Billybob. The drills you describe sound good.--AS

ras314
04-18-2005, 10:53 AM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote Billy_Bob:</font><hr>
So the above removes a lot of variables, then all that is left is how you hit the cue ball and your stroke.
<hr /></blockquote>
I am continually suprised at the effect on draw the stroke has. It has gotten to the point that about the only time I use a decent stroke with consisent follow thru is when I'm trying to control the amount of draw. /ccboard/images/graemlins/blush.gif

BTW, a good stroke is just as important when controling the cb angle when the shot is not straight on.

Cane
04-18-2005, 10:58 AM
I teach exactly the same speed control method that Randy does and if a student has good fundamentals otherwise, especially grip and stroke, then this method will have him drawing a cue ball with accuracy in a very short period of time. Once he masters stroke speed and a stop shot at various distances with stroke speed, then it becomes relatively simple to draw or follow with reasonably controlled accuracy at all distances. Only time it gives me trouble is during matches when I let the adrenaline get out of control. That's not the method's fault, that's Bob's fault!

Later,
Bob

tateuts
04-18-2005, 11:10 AM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote Leviathan:</font><hr> I don't control the length of straight draw well on shots of average length. Question: On shots of average length, do good players control the distance they draw the cb (1) mainly by hitting the cb harder or softer, (2) mainly by hitting the cb higher or lower, or (3) by adjusting both power of stroke and height of hit? Thanks for any thoughts!

AS <hr /></blockquote>


I play most of my draw shots two tips low and vary my speed. However, I think a player should be proficient at 1/2 tip low, one tip low and two tips low at all stroke speeds.

The problem with judging draw is that the amount of draw required changes drastically with how far you are from the object ball. For example, a medium speed draw shot two tips low when you are only about a foot from the object ball may travel the full table length. If you are three feet from the object ball, the same stroke may only travel three feet back.

I use controlled draw a lot - usually backing up the cue ball no more than 6" - 12". These I use just one tip low if the object ball is reasonably close. Playing shape for straight draw is the most overlooked position play in 9 ball when a player needs to get from one end of the table to another. I've often see players travel three rails, weaving through a congested table, when a simple straight draw shot would have been the best choice. Just play shape close to the object ball when you want to use draw.

Chris

Stretch
04-18-2005, 11:27 AM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote tateuts:</font><hr> <blockquote><font class="small">Quote Leviathan:</font><hr> I don't control the length of straight draw well on shots of average length. Question: On shots of average length, do good players control the distance they draw the cb (1) mainly by hitting the cb harder or softer, (2) mainly by hitting the cb higher or lower, or (3) by adjusting both power of stroke and height of hit? Thanks for any thoughts!

AS <hr /></blockquote>


I play most of my draw shots two tips low and vary my speed. However, I think a player should be proficient at 1/2 tip low, one tip low and two tips low at all stroke speeds.

The problem with judging draw is that the amount of draw required changes drastically with how far you are from the object ball. For example, a medium speed draw shot two tips low when you are only about a foot from the object ball may travel the full table length. If you are three feet from the object ball, the same stroke may only travel three feet back.

I use controlled draw a lot - usually backing up the cue ball no more than 6" - 12". Playing shape for straight draw is the most overlooked position play in 9 ball when a player needs to get from one end of the table to another. I've often see players travel three rails, weaving through a congested table, when a simple straight draw shot would have been the best choice. Just play shape close to the object ball when you want to use draw.

Chris <hr /></blockquote>

Great post Chris. St

Thunderduck
04-18-2005, 12:18 PM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote randyg:</font><hr> At CUE-TECH Pool School our students understand that there are only three (3) things that they can control. ANGLE-SPEED-SPIN.

Therefore if the shot is straight in the ANGLE is secured. The other two variables are SPEED-SPIN. Our students have been taught "stroke speed" is used in 60% of their shot making. This leaves only one variable to work on, SPIN. By adjusting tip positions only(which they can see), they then draw the cue-ball to any length they chose(within reason).....Just our thoughts. Hope it helps.....SPF-randyg <hr /></blockquote>

How is speed control achieved? Do you vary the length of the backswing to control speed? Or must you always use a full stroke and control the speed with the amount of force instead?

tateuts
04-18-2005, 01:52 PM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote randyg:</font><hr> At CUE-TECH Pool School our students understand that there are only three (3) things that they can control. ANGLE-SPEED-SPIN.

Therefore if the shot is straight in the ANGLE is secured. The other two variables are SPEED-SPIN. Our students have been taught "stroke speed" is used in 60% of their shot making. This leaves only one variable to work on, SPIN. By adjusting tip positions only(which they can see), they then draw the cue-ball to any length they chose(within reason).....Just our thoughts. Hope it helps.....SPF-randyg <hr /></blockquote>

Do you teach them to control follow by moving their tip higher? Sorry, but this doesn't make sense to me.

Chris

Bob_Jewett
04-18-2005, 02:20 PM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote Leviathan:</font><hr>... Question: On shots of average length, do good players control the distance they draw the cb (1) mainly by hitting the cb harder or softer, (2) mainly by hitting the cb higher or lower, or (3) by adjusting both power of stroke and height of hit? Thanks for any thought. <hr /></blockquote>
The pocket will be larger if you shoot more softly. If you want a fair amount of draw with a soft shot, you need to hit fairly low on the cue ball. So, you at least have to be able to hit the cue ball low, by which I mean far lower than most beginners and intermediate players are willing to hit the ball.

If you have a consistent draw bridge -- one that hits low but at a safe distance below center, call it two tips if you like -- all you have to adjust is the speed to get a larger draw distance. Adjusting the speed of the stroke seems to me to be a very natural way to make a ball go farther, and far more natural than changing the height of the tip.

Another reason to go for a well-below-center hit for most draw shots is that if you are off a little on the height -- perhaps a millimeter -- that's a smaller percentage error in the amount of spin, since the spin is proportional to the speed of the stick and the distance below center you hit.

But the complete truth is that you need to be able to hit with confidence at all distances below center and with all speeds if you really intend to master position.

To answer your original question, or rather not answer it, I doubt that anyone here has actually studied how top players achieve accuracy on draw distance.

Theory says that for a lot of draw shots, there is a distance below center to hit for which the distance of the draw is not much affected by the exact distance below center. This seems totally bizarre when you first hear it, but the way it works is this: If you hit a little lower than the "best" distance below center, the cue ball has more spin but it's going slower, so it loses more spin on the way to the object ball. On the other hand, if you hit a little higher than intended on the ball, the cue ball has less spin, but it's going faster and loses less spin on the way to the object ball. This means that if your bridge is a little off one way or the other, the cue ball will still draw the same distance.

This is the same kind of situation as the half-ball follow angle (30-degree rule) in which the result (angle or distance) is insensitive to errors in one of the controlling parts of the shot (cut angle or distance below center).

Unfortunately, the "best" distance below center depends on the length of the shot, the amount of draw wanted, and how sticky the cloth is.

SpiderMan
04-18-2005, 02:34 PM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote Bob_Jewett:</font><hr> <blockquote><font class="small">Quote Leviathan:</font><hr>... Question: On shots of average length, do good players control the distance they draw the cb (1) mainly by hitting the cb harder or softer, (2) mainly by hitting the cb higher or lower, or (3) by adjusting both power of stroke and height of hit? Thanks for any thought. <hr /></blockquote>
The pocket will be larger if you shoot more softly. If you want a fair amount of draw with a soft shot, you need to hit fairly low on the cue ball. So, you at least have to be able to hit the cue ball low, by which I mean far lower than most beginners and intermediate players are willing to hit the ball.

If you have a consistent draw bridge -- one that hits low but at a safe distance below center, call it two tips if you like -- all you have to adjust is the speed to get a larger draw distance. Adjusting the speed of the stroke seems to me to be a very natural way to make a ball go farther, and far more natural than changing the height of the tip.

Another reason to go for a well-below-center hit for most draw shots is that if you are off a little on the height -- perhaps a millimeter -- that's a smaller percentage error in the amount of spin, since the spin is proportional to the speed of the stick and the distance below center you hit.

But the complete truth is that you need to be able to hit with confidence at all distances below center and with all speeds if you really intend to master position.

To answer your original question, or rather not answer it, I doubt that anyone here has actually studied how top players achieve accuracy on draw distance.

Theory says that for a lot of draw shots, there is a distance below center to hit for which the distance of the draw is not much affected by the exact distance below center. This seems totally bizarre when you first hear it, but the way it works is this: If you hit a little lower than the "best" distance below center, the cue ball has more spin but it's going slower, so it loses more spin on the way to the object ball. On the other hand, if you hit a little higher than intended on the ball, the cue ball has less spin, but it's going faster and loses less spin on the way to the object ball. This means that if your bridge is a little off one way or the other, the cue ball will still draw the same distance.

This is the same kind of situation as the half-ball follow angle (30-degree rule) in which the result (angle or distance) is insensitive to errors in one of the controlling parts of the shot (cut angle or distance below center).

Unfortunately, the "best" distance below center depends on the length of the shot, the amount of draw wanted, and how sticky the cloth is. <hr /></blockquote>

I'm strongly in agreement with Bob on this one - you should NOT condition yourself to controlling draw with constant speed, while changing only tip placement.

Not only for the issues Bob points out, but for the more global reason of what happens when the shot is not perfectly straight-in.

Once the slightest angle is introduced to the shot, you need to independently control forward speed and spin at impact in order to exploit your position-play options. This means controlling TWO variables - desired speed of stroke and desired tip placement.

Straight-in is a specialty shot. Almost all shots will involve some angle, and for these you must independently control speed and spin. If you have conditioned yourself to only utilizing one variable (tip placement), you will be on unfamiliar ground trying to optimize results in most situations.

SpiderMan

Leviathan
04-18-2005, 03:13 PM
...And very interesting analysis from Bob, Chris, and Spiderman. Thanks for your input. Pool is an interesting game, you know it?--AS

Rod
04-19-2005, 12:00 AM
I agree very much Bob. The only factor I'll add is bridge length and pace of stroke. Esentally it is speed but it really means far more. The are times I use or teach tip placement say -- one tip, is a stun type of draw, or precise position on a more rolling type of shot.

Rod

JimS
04-19-2005, 03:44 AM
As has been said it's clear that speed, tip positon, length of shot and cloth condition must all be considered and/or altered and I don't know what is best. I'm not an expert... to say the least.

I do know that I want to make the shot so I want to hit the shot softly to minimize the chance of missing. Consequently, I usually choose to hit very low and alter the speed of the shot.

Qtec
04-19-2005, 04:13 AM
[ QUOTE ]
I'm strongly in agreement with Bob on this one - you should NOT condition yourself to controlling draw with constant speed, while changing only tip placement.

Not only for the issues Bob points out, but for the more global reason of what happens when the shot is not perfectly straight-in.

Once the slightest angle is introduced to the shot, you need to independently control forward speed and spin at impact in order to exploit your position-play options. This means controlling TWO variables - desired speed of stroke and desired tip placement."

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<font color="blue"> If the object of this exercise was to hit points A,B and C, how would you do it? Would you try and play with the same stroke speed and vary the tip position? Or would you hits 2 tips low and alter the angle by speed of stroke alone? What do you think is easier? </font color>

Straight-in is a specialty shot. <font color="blue"> I dont see how you can call a straight shot a 'specialty shot'. /ccboard/images/graemlins/crazy.gif /ccboard/images/graemlins/grin.gif </font color> Almost all shots will involve some angle, and for these you must independently control speed and spin. <font color="blue">Yes, thats what makes them difficult! Not only do you have to make the ball, you have to worry about how hard or soft you have to hit the QB. </font color> If you have conditioned yourself to only utilizing one variable (tip placement), you will be on unfamiliar ground trying to optimize results in most situations. <font color="blue"> Talking about straight shots; using my method, I get down on the shot and just try and pot the ball. Even if I am a millimeter high or low, I will always be close to my desired position. You, using your own method, have to pot the ball AND regulate the speed. You can hit it too soft and just stop the QB or play it too hard and draw it back 5 ft! I dont see what can be simpler than 'just shoot'.</font color>

SpiderMan <hr /></blockquote>

Cane
04-19-2005, 08:05 AM
The name of this game is consistency, right? I mean, isn't that what it all comes down to? I look at it like this. If I use my stroke speed on most shots, then I can better predict on a more consistent basis, what the cue ball is going to do. Now, it would be absurd to suggest using the same speed on every shot, it just can't be done, but if you learn to use the same speed stroke on most shots, then learn what tip locations will do what with the CB at that speed, then would not your CB control, therefore your game, become more consistent?

This will probably not be the case for everyone, and to be honest, until I went to my first class with RandyG, it wasn't the case with me. As a matter of fact, I couldn't even tell you how hard I was hitting a ball... Soft? Softer than WHAT? Hard? Harder than what? Randy teaches a way to "calibrate" stroke speed for every table, and every one of them will be different. Once I learned how to calibrate my stroke speed to a table quickly, then I automatically started using that 'stroke speed' on most shots and cue ball control skyrocketted.

That's me and my way, but in short, it comes down to Angle Speed and Spin. Angle is just the shot... anyone can learn to pocket balls. For me, once I learned a precise method of controlling Speed, knowing what or how much Spin to use became much easier.

Later,
Bob

SpiderMan
04-19-2005, 08:22 AM
Yes, straight-in is definitely a special case, where the "cut angle" is zero. In this special case, your cueball options are stop or varying amounts of follow/draw. Your position options lie on a line (the line of the shot), and can be achieved with one stroke speed and varying tip placement on the ball.

As soon as the shot becomes off-line (as most shots are), the cueball moves sideways as well as responding to the application of stop/follow/draw. The only way you can reach all position options is by varying both speed and tip placement.

That is why conditioning yourself to playing one speed only is a dangerous rut to fall into.

SpiderMan

Cane
04-19-2005, 08:53 AM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote SpiderMan:</font><hr> Yes, straight-in is definitely a special case, where the "cut angle" is zero. In this special case, your cueball options are stop or varying amounts of follow/draw. Your position options lie on a line (the line of the shot), and can be achieved with one stroke speed and varying tip placement on the ball. <font color="blue"> I absolutely agree with you, Marty. I NEVER intend to leave myself straight in except on the last ball. Straight in shots ARE specialty shots, because they drastically reduce the options of what you can do with the cue ball. </font color>

As soon as the shot becomes off-line (as most shots are), the cueball moves sideways as well as responding to the application of stop/follow/draw. The only way you can reach all position options is by varying both speed and tip placement.

That is why conditioning yourself to playing one speed only is a dangerous rut to fall into. <font color="blue"> Well, IMO true and not true. I don't think any instructor would teach to shoot every shot at only one speed. What the SPF instructors teach is a speed that you can shoot MOST shots with. I try to use my "stroke speed" on as many shots as I can, because I can more accurately predict what the CB will do at that speed, however 40% to 50% of the time, that speed just isn't practical. No way I can draw a ball 7 diamonds away at stroke speed, even 3 tips down. So, I adjust to each shot, however, I will use stroke speed any chance I get, for many reasons, not only for CB control, but to control other factors like Cling.</font color>

SpiderMan <hr /></blockquote>

pooltchr
04-19-2005, 09:18 AM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote Cane:</font><hr> Randy teaches a way to "calibrate" stroke speed for every table, and every one of them will be different. <hr /></blockquote>

Hey Bob..."You can't manage that which you can't measure"
Steve

tateuts
04-19-2005, 09:42 AM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote pooltchr:</font><hr> <blockquote><font class="small">Quote Cane:</font><hr> Randy teaches a way to "calibrate" stroke speed for every table, and every one of them will be different. <hr /></blockquote>

Hey Bob..."You can't manage that which you can't measure"
Steve <hr /></blockquote>

That's not true. Humans have this amazing ability to learn and remember the force needed to do things. When you want to walk slow, for example, do you move your feet at the same pace as walking normally but take little tiny steps?

Chris

Cane
04-19-2005, 10:20 AM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote tateuts:</font><hr> That's not true. Humans have this amazing ability to learn and remember the force needed to do things. When you want to walk slow, for example, do you move your feet at the same pace as walking normally but take little tiny steps?

Chris
<hr /></blockquote>

Chris... in a way you just stated exactly what I was trying to say. Walking is nothing more than Muscle Memory. OK, that's what we try to develop with our speed control system... muscle memory. PRECISE muscle memory. Within my speed control drill I train myself to move the cue ball different distances. I call those distances by a number... example, a 5 speed stroke on a 9 foot table makes the unimpeded CB travel 25 feet. I can easily calibrate that to a different table, for example, on an 8' table it travels about 22 feet. Now, I can get on any table, any cloth and within 3 or 4 strokes of the cue calibrate my stroke speed to the table and conditions. From then on, I don't have to think about it. I depend on Muscle Memory, same as walking. When we learned to walk, we didn't know the difference between speeds of walking. We developed our walking speed control through years of "practice" and experience. Over those years, we developed the muscle memory to control those speeds to a very precise level. Same with the stroke speeds. During the learning process, learning to control speed, if we have a starting point for each individual situation, a point we can MEASURE, then we can better manage our speed control. Players that are adept at managing speed control are easy to spot, regardless of the method they use... they're the ones that can move from a 760 Simonis to a cloth that looks like a lawn and within a few shots "know the table speed". They have learned to manage something that, regardless of their method, they've learned to measure.

Later,
Bob

Scott Lee
04-19-2005, 02:38 PM
Bob...One thing to note strongly, is that everything is calibrated from the "base" speed...which is a lag, aka 1-speed! It is SO important to practice a lag. Everything else moves up from there! Until your "muscle memory" knows and accepts the lag as the lowest speed, 'full-range-of-motion' movement; it is difficult to teach yourself our extremely EASY method of calibrating speed control on any table! Nice post! /ccboard/images/graemlins/grin.gif

Scott

JimS
04-20-2005, 03:52 AM
Muscles do not have memories. There is no such thing as "muscle memory". The brain becomes trained to make the muscles work precisely for certain skill based activities. The muscles don't learn how to play the piano or the drums or a guitar or pool. The brain learns the techniques involved and how to control the muscles in order to do the work.

We use the term muscle memory frequently and it is very imprecise and we are, imo, in need of a new and more correct phrase to describe learning pool skills.

randyg
04-20-2005, 04:28 AM
Isn't this fun. Different opinions. Great debates. America I love you....SPF-randyg

Scott Lee
04-20-2005, 12:04 PM
JimS...Okay, you're 'technically' correct! Geez, and I thought I was the only English Nazi! LOL (private joke...
you'd have to ask my kid!). But seriously, the term 'muscle memory' is an apt description of what we're trying to convey. You're correct, after the eyes see it, the brain does everything first...then our limbs move. However, in playing pool, we learn to repeat certain movements, until they are burned into our brains (the purpose of this is to make the movement 'subconcious', or rote). The movements are also "burned" into our muscles. What I mean is, that we learn to "feel" certain components of the stroke, and know when they are there, or when they are missing, when we actually stroke the CB. So...come up with a better descriptive term, and I'll try to employ it! /ccboard/images/graemlins/grin.gif

Scott

bsmutz
04-20-2005, 02:16 PM
How about muscle control memory, or MCM for short?

JimS
04-21-2005, 05:19 AM
I'm glad you agree with me Scott because I'm right /ccboard/images/graemlins/grin.gif

I don't believe that the movements are "burned into our muscles", but I agree we need a better term to describe what happens when a physical activity is repeatedly practiced.

Deep memory trace? Rut? Brain burned?...like burning a cd?

What really happens to the brain cells with repeated practice?

Hell I don't know! Anybody know? Where's Bob Fancher when we need him?

Qtec
04-21-2005, 05:28 AM
[ QUOTE ]
In the world of heavy equipment, part of that learning means memorizing how to use levers, joysticks, and even pedals in a coordinated way to control the attachment at the end of the boom.
Pre-requisite Abilities


But how does this memorizing take place?
At first, you need to concentrate in order to make your fingers, hands, arms (and feet) move in just the right way, based on what you see. What you're learning is precision, i.e. how to make the boom attachment perform the task (move a load, grapple a tree, drill a hole, etc.) carefully.

(Scientists have discovered that there are a large number of internal brain structures which work together with the input and output brain structures to form fleeting images in the mind. Using these images, we learn to interpret input signals, process them, and formulate output responses in a deliberate, conscious, way.)

But after a while, the "seeing-thinking-doing" gradually becomes "seeing-doing" because your muscles seem to "know" and "remember" just what to do. What you're learning now is speed, i.e. how to perform the task carefully and quickly. That's muscle memory.

Scientists call this "kinesthetic memory" or "neuro-muscular facilitation" and they speak of "sensory-motor" learning, since you are combining sensing input, i.e. what you see with your eyes, with motor output, i.e. what you do with your body.

Of course, during the "drill-and-practice", your muscles aren't really memorizing anything (since all memories are stored in your brain). Instead, what you see with your eyes is interpreted by your brain in the form of nerve signals to your muscles to make your body move.

Now by making the same movements in response to the same visual cues over and over again, the associated nerve-muscle connections gradually become more effective, i.e. the transmission of the signals becomes more effective, and this is how the "thinking" in the "seeing-thinking-doing" is gradually replaced by "seeing-doing", i.e. by muscle memory.<hr /></blockquote>



Hope this helps.

Q

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nhp
04-21-2005, 02:52 PM
The best way to control your draw is to have a controlled, solid stroke. This means good rythm, no shakiness, your are hitting exactly where you aim on the cueball, and a straight and smooth stroke. If you have all of these, drawing the ball anywhere you want is a piece of cake. The only way to achieve all of this is practice, practice, practice.