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poolmaster
04-23-2005, 11:33 AM
I've been playing pool for a while now and I want to get better. The weakest part of my game is the shot making part of my game. The shapes that I'm getting are all right but the shot making I do need to get better. How do I get better?

1Time
04-23-2005, 12:02 PM
If you want to try this on your own without hands on instruction, I suggest slowing down your shot making, discovering and practicing fundamentals. This worked for me some time ago. I practiced with a mechanical bridge and rolled the cue slow to the object ball when pocketing it. After getting good at this and tired of practicing that way, I went back to shooting without a mechanical bridge but I continued to roll the cue ball slow to the object ball. When doing these 2 drills it's important to learn from the reaction the object ball has off of the cue ball. Practice for 10 or 15 minute sets starting with easy shots and then with each subsequent set gradually shoot more difficult shots. Build up your confidence and consistency with the easier shots BEFORE progressing to harder shots. Try that for an hour each day for a few days. Then, gradually build your stroke on what you've learned. Then, if ever again displeased with your shot making, go back and practice these drills again.

ceebee
04-23-2005, 03:01 PM
Here is the road map to success...

Find a good instructor & take a series of lessons (minimum of 12 weeks) There are dozens of great instructors around the USA. Each one of them has a teaching format. So what if it costs you a $1000. That is paying chump change for what you will learn. You will be able to play better & enjoy the game much more, for the rest of your life. The $1000 might make you a cool $1,000,000 in your lifetime. It all depends on how you apply your own talent, to what you will learn. A good teacher might also tell you to find another sport to learn, on the 1st lesson.

Always practice with discipline (absolute discipline).

Buy yourself a dozen books to learn about the game. Then you will buy another dozen.

Buy yourself a dozen good match videos, watch the pattern of the shots repeat. Use the fast forward & rewind buttons, turn off the audio.

Talk to your instructor about what you have seen & how to apply that knowledge to your personal level of play.

If you try to learn the game, on your own, you may possibly build yourself a lower ceiling, for your skill level, forever.

wolfdancer
04-23-2005, 03:06 PM
pretty good advice....I'm still unlearning, what I "self-taught" myself

1Time
04-23-2005, 04:57 PM
Learning from an instructor is the best way, but it doesn't have to be expensive. I recall getting a lesson years ago from a local hustler people called "Kansas City Lou". That was a major turning point with my game, and all for the price of a cheeseburger and a Coke. Aside from a few other such lessons over the years, I've learned a great deal simply by watching and then imitating the stroke and play of better players.

ceebee
04-23-2005, 05:14 PM
Now that I think about it, a $1000 may be too high for a 12 week course, it all depends on the lessons given & the time spent teaching a student.

NOW hear this.... you must have a directional format. Bouncing around trying to learn this & that is very confusing.

The stroke is "Numero Uno", without a good stroke, you are very limited. Stroke speed will come with time & practice.

Making balls is a very important secondary objective, position play means nothing without pocketing the object ball.

Learning pattern shots, caroms & the diamond system will assist you in learning safety play.

Good Luck... cb

1Time
04-24-2005, 02:23 AM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote ceebee:</font><hr> NOW hear this.... you must have a directional format. Bouncing around trying to learn this &amp; that is very confusing.


<hr /></blockquote> Some are more easily confused than others. A directional format, however that may be defined, is not a must and may or may not be best.

ceebee
04-24-2005, 07:56 AM
Everyone has their opinion &amp; I am fine with that philosophy.

I do know that most complex activities cannot be taught "all at once", so a direction or format for the teacher to help a student might be best JMHO

Each student should always have their skills analyzed before marching off in a direction. Some may already have "killer strokes" &amp; don't need that part of their game upgraded.... This analogy should be applied to all facets of their game, before teaching is begun.

1Time
04-24-2005, 10:29 AM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote ceebee:</font><hr>

I do know that most complex activities cannot be taught "all at once", so a direction or format for the teacher to help a student might be best JMHO
<hr /></blockquote>

Again, no. A direction or format may or may not be best, and the lack thereof need not equate to teaching everything all at once.

wolfdancer
04-25-2005, 03:58 PM
I'd go with Ceebee on this one...

1Time
04-25-2005, 05:42 PM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote wolfdancer:</font><hr> I'd go with Ceebee on this one... <hr /></blockquote>

And so would I on CeeBee's several valid and valuable points.

Bob_Jewett
04-25-2005, 05:52 PM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote poolmaster:</font><hr> I've been playing pool for a while now and I want to get better. The weakest part of my game is the shot making part of my game. The shapes that I'm getting are all right but the shot making I do need to get better. How do I get better? <hr /></blockquote>
Maybe you're not diagnosing your problem correctly.

There are five levels of drills in the free "Basics Clinic" handout on the www.sfbilliards.com (http://www.sfbilliards.com) website. The Level 2 A-B-C drills only involve controlling the cue ball since they are straight in. (D is cut shots.) How well can you do on those position drills? (Scoring the drill is simple and explained in the text before the diagrams. In Shot 2B the object ball comes back with the cue ball to make the shot harder.)