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View Full Version : Short to medium slow shots.



Stretch
04-29-2005, 09:59 PM
There's lots of reasons to have a good slow shot. Bumping balls to the rails, rolling safe in close quarters, pocket speed shots with minimum cue ball movement just to name a few. I found that cueing high on the cueball makes it a lot tuffer to guage the speed. It's REALLY sensative and the tendancy is always to over roll it or double hit with a slooooow stroke. So i started hitting them low. Bingo! Much much better. That little skid you put on it with a low hit is the key to getting the ball rolling slow, but not TOO slow. If you don't already do this, try it out. Like i say there's lots of call for very quiet hits. This technique delivers. Just thought i'd throw that out to see if anyone else does that. St.

Nostalgia
04-30-2005, 06:01 AM
Sounds like you're talking about what I learned as a "stun" shot.

The idea of hitting low is to put backspin on the cue ball. Duh /ccboard/images/graemlins/wink.gif The reason a stun shot works is you must hit the ball with just enough backspin that the friction from the felt causes the cue ball to stop spinning backwards the instant it hits the object ball. This is what gives you the "kill" on the cue ball.

I like to practice it with a striped ball. I draw the ball down table and watch for the moment the stripe freezes. I don't have one of them there new fangled measles balls /ccboard/images/graemlins/smile.gif

-Joe

tateuts
04-30-2005, 06:50 AM
There are some shots I hit like that. The only thing about hitting slow rolled soft shots low is you really have to hit them on the center line. The slightest amount of english will swerve them off course.

By the time they hit the object ball they are in a full roll anyway (as you know) so the only difference is those first few inches.

If you want to try something a little different, a few years ago I took a lesson with Scott Lee. He showed me a very good slow roll technique. All you do is use center ball and take the cue back about one inch, then push forward through the cueball.

This technique is particularly good for push outs, but it works on any shot where you want a "slow motion" effect on the cueball. It is surprisingly controllable, and you are not "decelerating" into the cueball.

Chris

Stretch
04-30-2005, 07:16 AM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote tateuts:</font><hr> There are some shots I hit like that. The only thing about hitting slow rolled soft shots low is you really have to hit them on the center line. The slightest amount of english will swerve them off course.

By the time they hit the object ball they are in a full roll anyway (as you know) so the only difference is those first few inches.

If you want to try something a little different, a few years ago I took a lesson with Scott Lee. He showed me a very good slow roll technique. All you do is use center ball and take the cue back about one inch, then push forward through the cueball.

This technique is particularly good for push outs, but it works on any shot where you want a "slow motion" effect on the cueball. It is surprisingly controllable, and you are not "decelerating" into the cueball.

Chris <hr /></blockquote>

Yes Chris, you know what i mean. Everyone can fire a ball down but when it comes to the short tippy-tap shots, suddenly there is no method to accurately accomplish this. Well there is, but i've never heard it talked about here. I guess it's just a boring part of the game lol like takeing turns trying to freeze the cue ball and object ball together on the rail. /ccboard/images/graemlins/smile.gif St.

Cane
04-30-2005, 07:29 AM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote tateuts:</font><hr> If you want to try something a little different, a few years ago I took a lesson with Scott Lee. He showed me a very good slow roll technique. All you do is use center ball and take the cue back about one inch, then push forward through the cueball. <hr /></blockquote>

Chris, This sounds somewhat like the "finesse" speed stroke that I use. Not sure. I can tell you in August. Scott and I will be teaching with RandyG in Idaho Falls and I'll know then... unless he blows through Oklahoma before then, in which case he has a place to stay and a table to play on! HINT HINT!!! In any case, since I learned this finesse speed method from RandyG, it's been like a godsend on safety play and tight short shots where cue ball control must be VERY precise.

later,
Bob

Barbara
04-30-2005, 07:29 AM
Hey Stretch!

This was something I learned from Allen Hopkins a long time ago.

Have fun with this shot!

Barbara

Scott Lee
04-30-2005, 10:04 AM
Bob...My technique does not involve moving the grip hand foreward on the cue, and I'll be happy to show it to you!But, it does utilize a VERY short bridge (2"), and a very short backswing (1-2"). I am now also adding in Cue Tech's 'finesse shot' techniques, to broaden my students' stroke options, in those 'soft shot' situations.

Thanks for the invite, and you never know when I might just 'show up' in OK...wandering nomad that I am! LOL
Definitely, though, I'll see you in August!

Scott

wolfdancer
04-30-2005, 10:14 AM
Joe, they aren't talking stun shots...rather slow, finesse shots...think of a shot where you don't want either ball to move very far.
And since most posters here are pretty knowledgeable, some even teach the game...I wouldn't be 'splaining what stun shot is..

silverbullet
04-30-2005, 12:30 PM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote Stretch:</font><hr> There's lots of reasons to have a good slow shot. Bumping balls to the rails, rolling safe in close quarters, pocket speed shots with minimum cue ball movement just to name a few. I found that cueing high on the cueball makes it a lot tuffer to guage the speed. It's REALLY sensative and the tendancy is always to over roll it or double hit with a slooooow stroke.
<hr /></blockquote>

I think it is ball speed control, I cannot see why a person cannot hit the ball soft with high, and have the cb stop two inches past OB. Now, if you want to stop it, seems low might be easier.

Randy G said he could do it, so I presume it is possible.

Laura

Bob_Jewett
04-30-2005, 01:25 PM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote Stretch:</font><hr>... It's REALLY sensative and the tendancy is always to over roll it or double hit with a slooooow stroke. ...<hr /></blockquote>
If you often hit the cue ball twice on soft follow shots, you have a major problem in your fundamentals that you need to work on. If you want to work on soft shots, try playing straight rail. Get Daly's billiard book. Or, you can pile a correction on top of a fault.

Fran Crimi
04-30-2005, 05:57 PM
Hi Stretch,

Great post! I use that technique for long shots where I want the cb to follow a few inches past the ob. Some call it the drag-draw shot, or the drag shot or the kill stroke. Kills the speed of the cb nicely. Years ago we used to call it the draw-follow shot. I like that term the best. Makes my students scratch their heads when I say it. /ccboard/images/graemlins/grin.gif

Fran

Stretch
04-30-2005, 06:20 PM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote Barbara:</font><hr> Hey Stretch!

This was something I learned from Allen Hopkins a long time ago.

Have fun with this shot!

Barbara <hr /></blockquote>

I ALWAYS have fun with the shots i know little miss Spider Bridge /ccboard/images/graemlins/wink.gif. When you think of it there is a pretty wide range of shot speed to command. From a 26 mph break, to a .00239 mph tap. One stroke does not fit all.

Great to here all the instructors input on this topic as well. Speed control has never been much of an issue with me in the past, but as always i try to refine areas on a rotating basis /ccboard/images/graemlins/tongue.gif I guess this is Tippy-tap tune up time. Should have seen a few of my safties last night Barbra. EVIL, evil i tell ya! St.

Stretch
04-30-2005, 07:02 PM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote Fran Crimi:</font><hr> Hi Stretch,

Great post! I use that technique for long shots where I want the cb to follow a few inches past the ob. Some call it the drag-draw shot, or the drag shot or the kill stroke. Kills the speed of the cb nicely. Years ago we used to call it the draw-follow shot. I like that term the best. Makes my students scratch their heads when I say it. /ccboard/images/graemlins/grin.gif

Fran <hr /></blockquote>

Fran! Hi hun yes i love that shot too. Whenever i see it come up in a game i go YEAH got just the thing for you! lol But i was trying to describe a shot where you need to only shoot the cue ball a very short distance. Like if you wanted to "push out" to a specific spot, or roll up safe to an ob that's just off the rail.

Draw follow? hey i like that. I'm a big believer in word association. Like the word(s) triggers the proper response. I think it's damn near impossible to actually calculate the variables or mechanics involved in "planning" a shot. And IMO one shouldn't, it leads to mechnical thinking which kills ones touch. As long as i have a clear mentel picture of what needs to be done, my body will produce it. Descriptive words helps in the imagery. Draw follow, Thanks Fran. Very contradictory yet effective. Perfect fit! lol St.

Leviathan
04-30-2005, 08:21 PM
'Lo, Stretch. If you push your cue through a soft hit, you can cause the cue to overtake and double hit a slow-moving and decelerating cb. To avoid double hits on soft shots use a short but relaxed stroke with a natural followthrough; this will allow the cb to roll clear of the cue.

AS

Fran Crimi
04-30-2005, 08:37 PM
Oh, I see what you mean, now. I didn't notice the word 'short' in your post, even though you wrote it several times. (Brain dead)

I think the draw-follow term was coined by Howie Pearl back in the late '70's. Have to give credit where it's due. /ccboard/images/graemlins/grin.gif

Fran

Stretch
04-30-2005, 09:06 PM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote Leviathan:</font><hr> 'Lo, Stretch. If you push your cue through a soft hit, you can cause the cue to overtake and double hit a slow-moving and decelerating cb. To avoid double hits on soft shots use a short but relaxed stroke with a natural followthrough; this will allow the cb to roll clear of the cue.

AS <hr /></blockquote>

Yes, i use the 50/50 rule. Example 1 inch back, one inch follow. 2 inches back two inches follow. St.