PDA

View Full Version : Removing Dings from Shafts?



sneakypapi
05-01-2005, 01:02 AM
Im sure there are many posts about this topic in the archives, but I wanted to get some fresh input and ideas. I wanted to get some proven ways for raised a ding from a shaft. Also, I wanted to see if there was a difference between standard wood shafts and the laminated shafts like the Predator and Meucci Black Dot shafts. I know there is the Cue Doctor ding remover as well, but I never tried it. I would assume that product just flattens the wood to a level surface but does not raise the ding like steaming would. Any step by step directions to raise the ding would be great.

LJC_Cues
05-01-2005, 01:32 AM
Do not use a steam gun on a predator or any other laminated shaft the heat from the gun may cause the glue that holds the shaft together to come loose. predator even says in thier warranty to not use a steam gun I think it also says it will void the warranty.

Now on a regular shaft that you have a ding in.
first you have to get some 400 grit sandpaper and lightly sand the ding to open the pores on the wood. Then take either a steam gun, kettle whatever you are using and place it over the ding. Depending on how deep the ding is you may have to run it over it a couple times. Once the ding is out take some 1000-2000 grit paper and go over where you sanded earlier. Do not sand too much with the 400 if you do you will end up with a flat space in your shaft NOT GOOD!! once you use the 1000-2000 grit paper take some leather and rub it over where the ding was. (this will close the pores) You can actually do the leather on the whole shaft if you want it will make it feel more slick. If your shaft is dirty make sure you clean the whole shaft other wise it will look a little weird having a blue shaft with a white spot in it!

If this sounds like to much trouble take it to a professional!!

JimS
05-01-2005, 05:29 AM
The Cue Doctor ding remover works great for me, in every instance, and without wetting or sanding or steaming or?????

I'm not sure how it works and frankly I don't care. It works and it's inexpensive. It works without any damage to the shaft and I've used it maybe 50 times on my collecter South West shaft. NO problems. I bought a second one so I'd have one at home and always have one in my cue case. Great item.

All you have to do is rub it briskly over the dented area and it smooths it all out. It's magic! /ccboard/images/graemlins/laugh.gif

Sid_Vicious
05-01-2005, 06:24 AM
I still use a syringe with water and patience in case it takes a few applications...sid

Cane
05-01-2005, 07:02 AM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote LJC_Cues:</font><hr> Now on a regular shaft that you have a ding in. first you have to get some 400 grit sandpaper and lightly sand the ding to open the pores on the wood. Then take either a steam gun, kettle whatever you are using and place it over the ding. Depending on how deep the ding is you may have to run it over it a couple times. Once the ding is out take some 1000-2000 grit paper and go over where you sanded earlier. If this sounds like to much trouble take it to a professional!! <hr /></blockquote>

LJC, I'm going to try your method. I guess, being a bamboo flyrod maker, I'm a little anal. I take a tiny strip of 1000 grit and superglue it to a tootpick and sand only in the ding to open the grain, then roll up and wet tiny pieces of paper towel, put them ONLY in the ding, then let 'em soak for a minute then heat the paper only up with a soldering iron. It raises the ding out OK, but sure is a pain in the a$$. Your way sounds so much easier and being a cuemaker, I figure you know what you're talking about!

Thanks,
Bob

LJC_Cues
05-01-2005, 11:22 AM
Thats good glad your going to try it! another way you can remove a ding when your in a bar. Rub your hand vigorously over the ding to generate heat once you get it pretty hot take an ice cube and rub it over the ding. Then repeat step one if the ding is still there. Depending on the ding you may have to do this a couple times also. What this does is it open and closes the pores of the cue and the ding raises out. Pretty neat trick this guy taught me when I first started playing. It is a good way to get a ding out when it is bothering when your in the pool hall.

Stretch
05-01-2005, 11:38 AM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote Sid_Vicious:</font><hr> I still use a syringe with water and patience in case it takes a few applications...sid <hr /></blockquote>

Boatox for your cue? /ccboard/images/graemlins/grin.gif St

sneakypapi
05-01-2005, 11:49 AM
Kane said "LJC, I'm going to try your method. I guess, being a bamboo flyrod maker, I'm a little anal. I take a tiny strip of 1000 grit and superglue it to a tootpick and sand only in the ding to open the grain, then roll up and wet tiny pieces of paper towel, put them ONLY in the ding, then let 'em soak for a minute then heat the paper only up with a soldering iron. It raises the ding out OK, but sure is a pain in the a$$. Your way sounds so much easier and being a cuemaker, I figure you know what you're talking about!"

My question is when you use the soldering iron, do you touch the papertowel surface (for how long?, I assume not long enough to burn the towel) Do you think this would be ok for a laminated shaft, since only a very tiny area will be getting wet. I wonder what is the best way for laminated shafts to remove dings would be?

Cane
05-01-2005, 11:57 AM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote sneakypapi:</font><hr> My question is when you use the soldering iron, do you touch the papertowel surface (for how long?, I assume not long enough to burn the towel) Do you think this would be ok for a laminated shaft, since only a very tiny area will be getting wet. I wonder what is the best way for laminated shafts to remove dings would be? <hr /></blockquote>

No, I don't touch the paper towel, I just hold the soldering iron very close to it. It will boil the water out of the paper towel without touching it and I've depended on that heated water to "swell" the ding back out. As for whether it would work on a laminated shaft, I really have no idea. I don't have any experience with laminated shafts... Maybe ljc can help you with this one. Sorry, just not my area of expertise... now if you had a ding in your split bamboo fly rod, I'm your man! *S*

Later,
Bob

SPetty
05-01-2005, 03:25 PM
I've never done anything differently to get a ding out of my Predator than I would a non-laminated shaft. I wet the end of a q-tip and set it carefully in/on the ding. Check it occasionally and rewet as necessary until the ding is lifted. Then, where I differ from others, is that I don't like the idea of then sanding down any "lump" that may have been raised by the water. I simply burnish 'til hot to smooth out the area. It may still be slightly raised, but that eventually goes away.

bustah360
05-01-2005, 06:33 PM
JimS....Where can I find the Cue Doctor ding remover?

I use the Cue Doctor cleaner and it works pretty qreat. I still have to find the Cue Doctor wax or refinisher so that I can smooth it out with using a rag afterwards.

SPetty
05-01-2005, 08:05 PM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote bustah360:</font><hr>JimS....Where can I find the Cue Doctor ding remover?<hr /></blockquote>I know you were asking JimS, but can anyone else answer?

You can get one for $10.95 at Hawleys...

Please excuse me if I was out of line answering this.

Bassn7
05-01-2005, 08:44 PM
Wet rag, microwave for 1 minute, USE OVEN MIT!! HOT!!!Wipe on cue shaft up and down while it goes from hot to cool. Dry with other towel immediately. Done. Like new.

JimS
05-02-2005, 03:25 AM
or www.cuedoctor.com (http://www.cuedoctor.com)

It really does a great job and without all the hassle and with NO SANDING.

Give the profit to the inventer.

ChuckR
05-02-2005, 05:48 AM
The easiest way I have found to get the ding out of my cue is to remove the bell! Sorry, but I couldn't resist. ChuckR

sneakypapi
05-02-2005, 12:46 PM
Poster: SPetty
Subject: Re: Removing Dings from Shafts?
__________________________________________________ _______
I've never done anything differently to get a ding out of my Predator than I would a non-laminated shaft. I wet the end of a q-tip and set it carefully in/on the ding. Check it occasionally and rewet as necessary until the ding is lifted. Then, where I differ from others, is that I don't like the idea of then sanding down any "lump" that may have been raised by the water. I simply burnish 'til hot to smooth out the area. It may still be slightly raised, but that eventually goes away. __________________________________________________ ________

When you place the Q tip on the ding how do you hold it(by hand for a few minutes or other method) and in place and for how long? Also, do you use hot tap water?

Barbara
05-02-2005, 12:55 PM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote SPetty:</font><hr> I've never done anything differently to get a ding out of my Predator than I would a non-laminated shaft. I wet the end of a q-tip and set it carefully in/on the ding. Check it occasionally and rewet as necessary until the ding is lifted. Then, where I differ from others, is that I don't like the idea of then sanding down any "lump" that may have been raised by the water. I simply burnish 'til hot to smooth out the area. It may still be slightly raised, but that eventually goes away. <hr /></blockquote>

Ditto, but I'll use the Q-Wiz on the newly raised spot.

This is how I was taught to care for dings when I picked up my cue and My Cueman has never had to do any of this for me. /ccboard/images/graemlins/smile.gif!

Barbara

Barbara
05-02-2005, 12:58 PM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote sneakypapi:</font><hr>When you place the Q tip on the ding how do you hold it(by hand for a few minutes or other method) and in place and for how long? Also, do you use hot tap water?
<hr /></blockquote>

You do not need to use hot water and I generally hold the Q-Tip on the shaft by hand for a couple minutes. before using the Q-Wiz sander/burnisher.

You may have to repeat this depending on how bad the ding is.

Barbara

Bob_Jewett
05-02-2005, 02:17 PM
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote JimS:</font><hr> ... Give the profit to the inventer. <hr /></blockquote>
Inventor? The use of a glass rod to remove dents has been with us for a long time. See item 9 in http://www.sfbilliards.com/faq.html

Also mentioned there for the same purpose is the neck of a long-necked bottle, a shot glass, and various other implements found at the scene of the crime.

Troy
05-02-2005, 02:43 PM
Depends on the severity of the ding. No need to leave it on too long, not any longer than necessary. Using a glass rod or smooth glass bottle works just as well as those "cue specific" products that cost a lot more.
After the grain raises, I burnish with a piece of un-dyed leather.
Tap water works fine, as does saliva.

Troy
<blockquote><font class="small">Quote sneakypapi:</font><hr>When you place the Q tip on the ding how do you hold it(by hand for a few minutes or other method) and in place and for how long? Also, do you use hot tap water?
<hr /></blockquote>